OT: Bitten by a mole

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The mole would need to be tested for rabies. I am assuming it got away?

ran
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While it is a good idea to talk with your doc, I would highly doubt that the mole was rabid. AFAIK there has not been a documented case of a small animal giving rabies to a human (except a bat, maybe). I believe the reason for this is due to the fact that if a small animal is attacked by a larger rabid animal, such as a coyote, the smaller animal usually buys the farm and doesn't live to terrorize the locals.
Try this link - it's an Adobe .pdf file with some great information: http://www.wvdhhr.org/phs/forms/Rabies_Pamphlet.pdf

ran
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the
reason
and
You're absolutely right. I called my doc this morning, and he said get to the ER. When I got there they pretty much told me what you said.
Small animals can get rabies but almost never do. They don't really come into contact with animals that carry rabies, if they do it's a good chance they become a meal. In lab tests small animals exposed to rabies die within an hour and are incapacitated within 15 minutes. They wouldn't have much time to spread the disease.
I said it would have been nice if my doctor had told me this and saved me the trip and they just chuckled, any doctor hearing the "R" word is not going to take responsibility for telling you not go to the ER.
Apparently they keep records of all rabid animals and in the off chance that a rabid wild mole had been biting people within the same 15 minutes when you got bit you need to go there... :)
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I would sure love to know where to find that study, cause I am a virologist and took a course in veterinary virology and never came across this in relation to rabies. in any case, rodents (defined as animals with the big upper/lower incisors) have not been found to carry rabies. "Bites" are not the only way to transmits rabies. How do bats (sharp pointy teeth) get rabies? Ingrid
In lab tests small animals exposed to rabies die within

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wrote:

virologist and took

to rabies.

incisors) have not

rabies. How

I would ordinarily submit to the expertise of a virologist on such a topic, but this stuff is so elementary you're actually freaking me out that virololgists may be dangerously undereducated!
Bat rabies is extensively studied, & the veterinary college at Kansas State University is even now doing research on rabies vaccinations for bats. While rabies is not as big risk from bats that many people fear (risk to human health is so remote that it is regarded entireloy safe safe to encourage bats with bat-houses around one's house), but it's nevertheless an unfortunate fact that the most common wild animal rabies carriers are (in order of consequence) skunks, foxes, bats, coyotes, & raccoons, among which skunks & raccoons are most significant for cat & dog infections, then to humans, since by far the ;most common source of rabies in hujmans is the domestic cat (winning out over the dog). However, other mammals are not immune to the infection.
Large rodents are well known to carry rabies at least occasionally, mostly woodchucks & occasionally beavers that live in areas where raccoon rabies is prevalent, getting it from raccoon encounters. Rabies is rarely reported in rodents smaller than woodchucks because if attacked by a larger infected animal, small rodents have almost no chance of surviving the initial physical assault, though they certainly are susceptible to infection (but would probably never again leave their shelter until they died, so the chance of encountering humans while alive & infective is unlikely).
For quick reference on rodents with rabies, see this abstract at MedLine, from the Journal of Wildlife Diseases, Jan 1997: <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids 27687&doptstract>
The article documented a 354% increase in rabies infections in rodents between 1971 & 1984, cases of infected rodents reported from 22 states, again predominantly gophers. There are additional articles cited in the full article that indicate sufficient genetic distinction for rodent rabies that it must in some populations be spread between the rodents themselves rather than exclusively from infected raccoon encounters. If you look at the MedLine short version & hit the button for related articles, you'll get abstracts of further research on rodent rabies. This is stuff that any veterinarian virologist most certainly should have studied, so you've had extraordinarily bad luck with quality of professors.
It is not a threat to human health issues however. Of 24,000 rabies tests of people bitten by squirrels, rats, mice, hamsters, gerbils, moles, & shrews, not one case of human infection from rodentia or insectivora species has ever come to light. Such infections are not scientifically impossible, but the risk of human infection from rodent or insectivora bites is so remote that it is generally regarded as no risk to humans. Logomorph rabies (rabbits & hares) is more common, but that is even so uncommon; an infected rabbit won't likely live long enough to bite people.
Not that there aren't plenty of OTHER zoonotic diseases to worry about even with moles. Moles as well as rodents have been documented to carry rikettsial pox & Leptospirosis diseases, & these can be serious for human infection, plus moles like other small mammals can carry ticks that carry diseases to humans. Moles can also carry external & intestinal parasites to dogs & cats, & moles have been found infected with bovine tuberculosis, so probably do help transmit TB among livestock, & bovine TB is zoonotic meaning it can jump to people.
Mole bites are actually rare because they do not have gnawing teeth in front, their small unspecialized teeth are far back in their snouts, & though needle-sharp are too short & too far back to pose much threat, though obviously it can happen.
-paghat the ratgirl
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Goldfish have rabies?
John
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virologist and took

rabies.
incisors) have not

rabies. How

Well I'm out of my league here. This is what I was told by the Triage nurse in the ER at Newton Memorial Hospital in Newton NJ. I was there yesterday (7/12/2004) around 3-4 pm. She left for about 5 minutes to check with a Doctor whose name I did not get, returned and related that to me. I supposed if you really wanted to know you could give them a ring to see if they happen to know of the study.
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You may want to get a tetanus shot just to be on the safe side too. Although by now I don't know if it would help since you were bit a short time ago.
Just an afterthought.

nurse
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Yes that is the key, afaik: rodents do not CARRY rabies w/the exception of the woodchuck (maybe because it's larger and has a fighting chance of getting away and its body doesn't succumb as quickly??)
And yes, how DO bats get rabies? I guess a "vampire" bat would make sense if it bit an infected animal - is that what we're talking about? Or do regular every day "Little Black Bats" that catch and eat mosquitoes get it too?
A funny(well, to me): A few years ago in the Boston area there was a case of a rabid woodchuck running across a backyard at full speed to attack a toddler on a swingset (ok, that's not the funny part) . . . and all I recall is the silly mother being on TV saying something like "I'm sure glad we were able to catch that Woodchuck and have it tested for rabies so little Johnny wouldn't have to get treatments unnecessarily..." and all I could think was "stupid lady, if a WC is running across your yard to attack the kid it's definitely rabid, no ifs, ands or buts about it".
LeeAnne
wrote:

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