olives

I have a couple in large pots which have grown well. I'm thinking of putting them in the garden. Does anyone have any knowledge or advice? thanks Jon
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Shazam wrote:

Hi Jon, I don't know exactly what kind of "olive" you write about, and what state you live in, but here in the State of Arizona they are outlawed. If you had an olive tree in before the law passed many,many years ago, you could keep it. But growing new olive trees or importing trees or seeds, is illegal.
Why? Arizona is known for its healthful climate, so they took as many steps as they could to keep it that way. Also forbidden, the fruited mulberry tree, and I'm sure many more such allergenic plants.
Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

so what do you put in your martinis in Arizona? I'm in England, bought the olives from one of the garden goodies suppliers, and lost the instruction sheet People in Italy and Spain don't die of olive poisoning, what are you Arizonians made of?? :-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@lineone.net says... :) so what do you put in your martinis in Arizona? :) I'm in England, bought the olives from one of the garden goodies suppliers, :) and lost the instruction sheet :) People in Italy and Spain don't die of olive poisoning, what are you :) Arizonians made of?? :) :) Arizona has always been thought of as the place to go for people with pulmonary concerns and with the allergy-producing pollen of the olive tree..the two don't mix.
--
Lar

to email....get rid of the BUGS
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have an olive tree over my car and I had a pulmonary thing when I first moved here... I've never had sneezing problems, though. I would be interested in hearing more on this alleged connection.
I actually tried to cure the olives - bluck. They do require annual maintenance (trimming).
- mercenary gardener z10
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
says... :) I have an olive tree over my car and I had a pulmonary thing when I first :) moved here... I've never had sneezing problems, though. I would be :) interested in hearing more on this alleged connection. :) :) :) http://allallergy.net/fapaidfind.cfm?cdeoc 97 http://www.klastv.com/Global/story.asp?S 28035
--
Lar

to email....get rid of the BUGS
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3 Nov 2005 05:07:59 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
:) Hi Jon, I don't know exactly what kind of "olive" you write about, :) and what state you live in, but here in the State of Arizona they are :) outlawed. If you had an olive tree in before the law passed many,many :) years ago, you could keep it. But growing new olive trees or importing :) trees or seeds, is illegal.
I beleive it is only banned in parts of Arizona, rather than the whole state and fruitless varieties are ok everywhere in the state.
Lar. (to e-mail, get rid of the BUGS!!
Dancing dog is back! http://media.ebaumsworld.com/smartdog.wmv
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

putting
Hard to say not knowing where you live. They like mediterranean conditions, warm wet summers and cool dry winters, soil pH neutral to slightly alkaline, good drainage. They will likely die in heavy soggy soil. I have seen them grow quite well in a schoolyard, with the tar playground almost to the trunk, at Newcastle (on Hunter) that has mild damp winters and hot damp summers and grey sand for soil. They were never tended in any way as they were planted as shade trees. The local Greek and Italian community used to gather the fruit annually.
David
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well, I have never seen Mediterranean conditions as described above. The usual description of Mediterranean conditions is cool damp winters with warm/hot/and dry summers - and these would be the conditions of Greece and Italy, where olives probably originated.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Think very carefully before planting olive trees. Any fruit that falls on concrete will get smashed and stain the concrete, worse any fruit that you smash underfoot will end up staining the carpet.
-S
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Perhaps this is a problem with a particular type of olive, or a particular type of concrete. When I lived near San Francisco I knew of several olive trees that were planted as landscaping around Santa Clara office buildings, and even collected olives from one tree to experiment with curing them. I do not recall a problem with staining.
Actually, the uncured olives resembled small rocks, and seemed unlikely to stain anything.
My email address is LLM041103 at earthlink dot net.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I suppose I should have clarified. They aren't permanent stains, just dark purple olive juice spots. I don't know what type of olive tree it was, but it's the same type that seems to be common in many areas around the south bay and san jose area..
The stains are caused by smashed fallen fruit that gets ground into the sidewalk.
-S
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.