OK to transplant 5gal Peach Tree??

I picked up at the store yesterday a nice-sized ('bout 6 foot tall) Elberta Peach tree for a measly $10. It looks healthy (otherwise, I wouldn't have bought it) if a little overgrown for the 5gal pot it's in.
We're heading into the hottest month of the year here in California. And, I know that transplanting in hot weather is usually a bad idea.
My question is this: Should I wait for it to go dormant before planting in the ground? Or, should I just try to insulate the pot (standard black plastic) from the high heat to help conserve moisture? Or put the tree, pot and all into a hole in the ground and then do the bareroot planting come winter?
(We *have* had some major problems with gophers that I'm still trying to figure out how to manage best.... And the occasional deer coming by for some salad....)
Thanks!
--Bryan
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On Wed, 23 Aug 2006 23:15:03 GMT, BB

Is it in a container, or is it bare root? You mention both. If it's in a container, water it a hundred times in the container till the whole root ball is entirely saturated. A really good thing to use as your very last watering is a gallon or two of liquid seaweed, sold at Lowes and Home Depot.
Dig the hole and make it two to three times the diameter of the container and do not let it have smooth sides. Jag the sides with a pitchfork.
Gently remove the tree from the container. If you have to really tug, turn the container on its side and press on the sides as you roll it around and loosen it all up.
Place the tree in the hole making sure the root ball is no deeper in the ground, than it is in the container. In other words, do not put soil up to the bark any higher than it already is in the container. There should be a natural root flare at the base of the tree. The number one reason trees do not survive is they are planted too deeply.
Take into account for soil settling, so try not to place the tree on soft soil in the hole. Roots grow outward on fruit trees, so the bottom of the hole can be left and not softened. To give some drainage to the area take a fork and make holes in the bottom of the soil.
If your soil is very hard, dry, clumpy or too wet, do not dig the hole you can hurt the soil structure. If it IS dry, give that area a really good watering using a cheap yellow circle you can get at any garden store for two dollars. Those are the best devices for watering trees.
Do NOT amend the soil. Fill the soil around the root ball after you've broken all clumps up and the top layer all around the tree top dress with a good compost and on top of that, shredded tree mulch. Remember, do not put soil, compost or mulch near to or above the line where the root flare should be out of the hole.
Water it deeply again, at least till you get the soil saturated, then check every few days for dry soil. Do NOT be tempted to over water.
None of this can be done with a bare root plant, or a balled and burlap tree any time in high heat.
OR you can bury the pot and keep it watered till the dormant months come.
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"Jangchub" wrote

This is incorrect.
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wrote:

Really? Where do you live?
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"Jangchub" wrote

That's irrelevant. :o)
I haul out of Georgia, New York, Oregon, Ohio, Illinois, Michigan, Florida, Carolinas, to name a few. Basically I haul to everywhere except Arizona.
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wrote:

I don't care where you haul, however trees in containers have a different rate of successful planting in high heat. Balled and burlap trees, along with bare root trees cannot survive the shock of transplanting in high heat of summer.
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Black absorbs more heat from the sun than any other color. Use white.
If you can get the tree out of the tub without losing all the soil around the roots, I'd recommend transplanting now. Water well.
If you wish, spray with Wilt-Pruf or similar product.
vince norris
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"BB" wrote in message

I transport semi truck loads of deciduous & evergreens to job sites. Most retail nurseries will tell their consumers not to plant or even transport during the hot season.
You will notice commercial, government, high end residential landscaping does not stop because of heat.

I would get a product for root stimulation, such as MyCor Tree Saver. Use as directed.
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Godfry wrote:

Yes, and I notice many commercial plantings with lots of dead trees. These people are either ignorant or probably feel they will not be around the next season when the trees die. Transplanting a tree is very stressful to the plant, and combining that with hot weather is not really a good idea.
Sherwin D.

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"sherwindu" wrote

Well Sherwin, I hate to burst your bubble, but there are many professional landscapers that do over 50 million in business per year.
Trees must be taken care of, if some developer is involved, you can bet they're not buying premium to begin with. Probably buying park grade, and has some jack leg installation. I concur there are many of these people around, but my dealings are with professional people.
I know professionals will disagree with your thoughts of planting in hot weather, I guess that's why they're the professionals.
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They may be professionals, but they have the owners breathing down their throats to get something planted so they can sell their condominium, factory, whatever. They may do a careful job planting, but they certainly are not planting them at an optimal time if they do it in the heat of mid-summer. They may get away with it, depending on how the trees are cared for afterwards, and how sensitive the variety is to being out in the blazing sun. Homeowners are not under the same pressures as developers who have to dress up their properties to sell them. Any professional who advocates planting in the hottest time of the year should have their license revoked.
Sherwin D.
Godfry wrote:

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wrote:

Liquid seaweed is a root stimulation tool and it gives fauna in the soil a good tonic.
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Bryan,
The tree doesn't have to be dormant to transplant it, but it would not be advisable to plant it until the hot weather passes. Late summer or early winter would work.
If you plant it with the pot now, find a cool and shady spot. You could also leave it in the pot and put it in a cool shed. Be sure to keep it moist as plants in pots tend to dry out quickly. Unless the plant looks like it is bursting from the pot, keeping it a few more months in the pot should not hurt it. Be sure to free up the roots when planting if they are tangled or compressed. My Elberta here in the Midwest is about 15 years old and is a consistent producer and gives terrific peaches.
Good Luck,
Sherwin D.
BB wrote:

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Wow. Who knew that questions of planting a fruit tree would generate such controversy? :)
Regardless, I thank y'all for your opinions.
Since I'm not a professional commercial landscaper, I will be waiting until the tree goes dormant before planting. The tree does not seem to be bursting out of its pot. I will just keep it from drying out until winter- ish.
--Bryan
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