Oh Deer, Where Are All The Hunters?

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This year, the white-tail deer have been terrorizing the State. They have already caused two fatal traffic accidents as well as numerous non-fatal accidents. One has transmitted rabies, and another one invaded an old woman's house right thru a sliding glass door and did considerable damage before she was somehow able to drive it out. Two years ago, one lived under my deck and refused to leave, even when I fired a shotgun blast in the air. To get him to leave, I dropped a 10-pound barbell plate over the side and it nailed him in the neck. About three yrs. ago, another one charged my window, cracking it. And they completely wiped-out my old lady's 500 or so flower bulbs this fall.
There's never a hunter around when you really need one.
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Way Back Jack wrote:

Don't you think that maybe you aimed the shotgun in the wrong direction?
Dave
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Way Back Jack wrote:

Sounds like you need some wolves!
So, Rabies from a deer? Not many infected in the US! Did the deer bite the person or did they get it through the handling of an infected deer they had shot!
There are precaustion in processing an animal you have shot!:
The rabies virus is not present in the meat itself, but in the surrounding nervous tissue, as well as in the brain, spinal cord and the animal's saliva. Rabies is transmitted only when the virus is introduced into an open wound (bleeding in past 24 hours) or to mucous membranes (eyes, nose, mouth). Avoid touching the animal's mouth, brain or spinal cord. Follow safety precautions below:
Wear goggles and long rubber or plastic protective gloves while field dressing, skinning, butchering and processing meat.
After butchering, wash hands with soap and water, and wash any contaminated clothing and the work area.
Disinfect gloves and butchering utensils in a solution of one part household bleach to 20 parts water for about twenty minutes.
Wear gloves while preparing meat for cooking and wash your hands with soap when finished. Disinfect cooking utensils and food preparation area with disinfectant, as above.
Cook game meat thoroughly. Heat destroys the rabies virus and other disease organisms that might be present.
Freezing will not destroy the rabies virus. Precautions should be taken while thawing meat.
Hanging the deer does not eliminate the risk of rabies.
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Bush is running Homoland Security ... these deer terrorists have got to go.
cill cill cill ...
get your Oswald on Jack ... give warm regards with cold steel... this is what healthy looks like.
sumbuddie luvs ya
:()
in article snipped-for-privacy@news.newshosting.com, Way Back Jack at KissMy@ss wrote on 12/24/06 7:46 AM:

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If deer were rats, there would have been a campaign to eradicate them long ago.
But rats do less damage, rats carry less disease, rats don't tear down fences, rats are a much more localized disease vector than deer by orders of magnitude, and healthy rats don't attack humans like deer do.
So we protect the deer, and kill the rats.
Man has so screwed up deer that they are not even afraid of man any more. Nice custodian of nature, man...
If man were really interested in supporting nature, the natural food chain would be restored, and man, being at the top, would be eating any deer that came onto his property, as nature intended.
If the city reimbursed every homeowner for deer damage, making those who love the cute deer help pay in higher taxes for the damage their enjoyment causes instead of making others pay for their pleasures, you would see a marked shift in attitude.

But they're so cute. A couple deaths is a small price to pay for cute deer

But they're so cute. Rabies is a small price to pay for cute deer
>and another one

But they're so cute. A few terrorized old ladies is a small price to pay for cute deer.

But they're so cute. Your family's injuries will be a small price to pay for cute deer.

But they're so cute. Your loss of $300 worth of bulbs and 25 hours work and the enjoyment of the flowers and labor is a small price to pay for cute deer.

"Hunters" don't hunt vermin and pests, "Hunters" hunt game
Eradicators hunt vermin.
Deer belong in the woods, that bastard Bambi (his father was an elk, mother a deer) belongs in the forest.
In all honesty, the world and mother nature will not suffer one iota if the suburban deer herd is totally eradicated.

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hob wrote:

The rat is an example of an animal that adapted to living among humans and thus became considered vermin rather than a cute furry thing. Deer are rapidly becoming the new "rat".

There is an abundance of deer and there are poor hungry people. Isn't there a logical solution to the two problems? No it is not eat the poor.
Dave
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

my property much more than when the poor wandered through my property when I lived in the city . The deer don't steal things, paint graffiti, or leave beer cans and wine bottles.
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On Sun, 24 Dec 2006 13:12:14 -0700, Louis Boyd wrote:

seconded.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

In WI and other states as well, hunters donate extra venison to the poor see http://huntforthehungry.com
--
Remove the TOS star ship captain to reply.

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BR wrote:

That is good, especially if combined with increased limits. Here in WV, a landowner can get permits to kill 3 anterless deer. That means 6 deer for my wife and I, so last year we got the permits and allowed some of the local boys to bow hunt. Not legal to use someones permit, but as long as you go with them to register the kill, no one is going to question it. Between our and neighbors property they killed 14 and we are talking of a combined land of about only 12 acres. Of course, that didn't even put a dent in the deer population.
Dave
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Here in Alabama each hunter can legally kill 150 deer per season, no more than 75 of those being bucks. I've heard of a few people getting 100+, although the average is much lower. Most of the excess to personal needs gets donated to the poor. And even with those generous bag limits, we rarely exceed harvesting 20-25% of the deer population.
Bob
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wrote:

are you serious? 150?

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hob wrote:

Yes. A 75 day season - Nov 16 thru Jan31. Hunter's choice, 2 per day, only 1 of the 2 can be a buck.
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Bob wrote:

Wow! Here you get one buck and one doe (provided you remembered to buy a doe tag). Every once in a while, they have a special season in areas that are totally overrun with deer, but that's only good for one more. Then again, since Pennsylvania is second only to Michigan in the number of licensed hunters, two per season may be enough.
--
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BR wrote:

That's why we have the season & bag limits that we do - we are totally overrun with deer. IIRC, Alabama has the second highest deer population in the US. Killing only bucks was letting the does breed like rabbits. Plus killing the big bucks left the inferior small bucks to breed and now the majority of our deer population is growth deficient. Conservation management finally came to their senses and decided it was time to thin out the does, but I believe they waited too long because we haven't even started to get the population back in balance.
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On Sun, 24 Dec 2006 15:46:09 GMT, KissMy@ss (Way Back Jack) wrote:

My recent column discusses the deer problem. I post it here because the Nashua Telegraph will charge you for it.
Telegraph, The (Nashua, NH)
November 19, 2006 Section: Perspectives Columns
Tactics change, but the epic battle of man vs. deer grinds on
I hope that many hunters can put a nice venison roast on their Thanksgiving Day dinner table. I am not one of them, as people like me should not own a gun, but I lead the deer-hunter cheerleading squad. Heck, I'll put on tight shorts and shake my booty if it will help bring down more of the big-eyed, white-tailed rats. Deer think of my mini-farm as a 24/7 mini-mart dedicated filling their bellies, as if their bellies are ever filled. One newbie gardener once asked me how to tell when cantaloupes are ripe. "The day after the deer eat them they would have been perfect," was my advice. After growing a deer smorgasbord, he switched to a less frustrating hobby - cat training.
I have tried all of the conventional deer-repellents, including bars of soap hung about, predator urine (who collects that stuff?), electric fence, Hinder, noisemakers and water sprinklers, etc., etc. They all work for a while.
I got wise to deer tactics when I slipped up on a bunch of them after stringing bars of soap on my fruit trees. A big doe was chuckling as she said to the others, "Let's let him think that works for a while. He will drop his guard and then we will clean him out. The cantaloupes will be ripe on Tuesday. We will move in early that morning."
I outfoxed them that time when I picked my cantaloupes Monday afternoon. The deer retaliated by munching all of my tomatoes to the ground. Later that year my lovely wife, Little Kahunah (her mother is the Big Kahunah) crinkled her nose as she looked over the nice Italian dinner I had prepared. "Why is the marinara sauce yellowish-orange?" she asked, poking at it with a fork as if it was a plastic imitation.
"Uhhh, it is a new recipe," I explained innocently. "We did not have many tomatoes this year because of the deer."
She took a bit of sauce on the end of her fork and licked it. "Tastes funny. Sweet and kinda melony."
"Uhhhh, yeah. Like it?"
Deer are the bin Ladens of nature, watching patiently from the edge of society and waiting for an opening; then they strike hard and disappear into the wilderness. Usually they do their damage at dusk or daylight, but this year I saw a big doe sampling my pears in the middle of the day. I ran out to shoo her off. She looked my way and stuck her tongue out to give me a raspberry cheer before bounding off. Her white tail flip was like an obscene gesture with the middle finger.
Lately I have been using unconventional deer repellent techniques. Bribery worked for a while. I had a neighbor who fed the deer in her back yard every day. One afternoon I caught her husband rummaging in my garage trying to sneak back some of his tools that I had borrowed. He complained about her deer friends choosing his apple crop for dessert as he clutched Little Kahunah's favorite leaf rake and edged toward the door.
"Oh, feeding them is a good thing, a very good thing" I explained as I tried to wrench the rake from his grasp. His right eyebrow rose skeptically as he pulled away and grabbed at the stack of his shovels that I have painstakingly collected over the years.
I tried to help him understand the logic of it: "When she feeds them they leave me alone."
He grumbled something unintelligible as he eyed the fine set of mechanic's tools that he owns. I thought that I made out the words, "ignorant ass," but I am sure that he never studied the education of donkeys, so I must have been mistaken. I made a note to myself: "Borrow the keys to the mechanic's toolbox from his wife."
Unfortunately, that neighbor moved away last year, leaving me a herd of spoiled four-legged moochers and an empty garage.
I turned to a technological deer repellent when I installed motion detectors in the mini-farm. The detectors connect wirelessly to our home alarm system. Any large critter moving about sets off a siren in the house and I spring from bed and run into the farm screaming. I learned to pull on a robe as I exit the house after cars started lining the road for the nightly show.
This seems to have the desired effect. First the deer stop eating, then they all fall down laughing and clutching their bellies, at least they did before I started putting on a robe. I seize that opening to spray them with my homemade wet-moose smell from an old family recipe. Deer are fastidious critters who hate being confused for moose, so they give my place a wide berth now.
Happy Thanksgiving all, please pass the venison.
John Bachman of Amherst can be reached at snipped-for-privacy@anatek.mv.com.
moved away last year, leaving me a herd of spoiled four-legged moochers and an empty garage.
I turned to a technological deer repellant when I installed motion detectors in the mini-farm. The detectors connect wirelessly to our home alarm system. Any large critter moving about sets off a siren in the house and I spring from bed and run into the farm screaming. I learned to pull on a robe as I exit the house after cars started lining the road for the nightly show.
This seems to have the desired effect. First the deer stop eating, then they all fall down laughing and clutching their bellies, at least they did before I started putting on a robe. I seize that opening to spray them with my homemade wet-moose smell from an old family recipe. Deer are fastidious critters who hate being confused for moose, so they give my place a wide berth now.
Happy Thanksgiving all, please pass the venison.
Copyright, 2006, The Telegraph, Nashua, N.H. All Rights Reserved.
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On Mon, 25 Dec 2006 20:05:31 -0500, John Bachman

Thanks for the article John. I might have missed it in the local papers.
Regards,
Hal Zone 8
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Love it John, my fellow NH resident.
Cheryl
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Deer dig up and eat flower bulbs?
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he didn't say they did --- however, they have pulled many of mine up when they ate the tops.
Mothballs helped a lot
(ok, preemptive strike here - no, not "moth balls" - mothballs)

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