Office Plant?

I need a plant for the office that:
1. Doesn't get any sunlight, only artificial light.
2. Gives off a lot of oxygen, that's the main reason I want it , I don't care how it looks.
3. Prefereably tall. could go as hight as 4 or 5 feet even.
thanks
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On 5 Jan 2007 16:03:59 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

I had one of these for a while:
http://weblog.delacour.net/archives/2004/09/china_doll.php
It did pretty much what you specified, except that it didn't stop at 4 or 5 feet. I gave it away and made someone happy. Well, I made me happy also.
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On 5 Jan 2007 16:03:59 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

There are a few low-light requirement plants. Sanseveria (snake plant) will grow 4 feet high. The non-variegated variety will do better. Water it once or twice a month. A heart-shaped philodendron (vine) in a hanging basket will do well also. Also look at (non-variegated) staphilia. Don't expect a lot of oxygen without bright light.
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wrote:

I used to have a Prayer Plant that absolutely *loved* office lighting. http://www.thegardenhelper.com/Maranta.htm It bloomed quite regularly, in fact.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Here are some useful charts of houseplants by sunlight and other requirements: http://garden-gate.prairienet.org/sunroom_aggie.htm Excerpted from this full document from the Texas A&M Master Gardener handbook: http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/plantanswers/publications/houseplant/houseplant.html
Aggie Horticulture also offers this searchable illustrated database: http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/interiorscape/tamuhort.html
There are plants that will survive low light but few will thrive and grow actively. Many of the lush plants you see in commercial spaces are being maintained by plantscaping services that know how to provide optimal care to keep plants looking their best.
Bright sunlight can measure around 10,000 footcandles. A room without natural light may measure only 100 fc. Your best bet is to borrow a page from the pros and pick a couple of low light plants, one for the office and one for a location with better light conditions, and rotate them every three months or so.
Be very careful not to overwater a plant being kept in low light conditions. Always check the soil before you water and remember that wilting can be a sign of overwatering. Plant roots need oxygen to absorb water and can die in the midst of plenty if kept waterlogged for too long.
As for oxygen, don't count on much :)
-- Karen
The Garden Gate http://garden-gate.prairienet.org =================================================================="If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need." ^and cats -- Cicero ==================================================================On the Web since 1994 Forbes Best of Web 2002
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Look to the old Cast Iron plant also call Aspidistra.
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JohnS wrote:

That's a good suggestion thanks. I think I'm going to go with a pothos. Thanks,
dt
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