Oak tree fertilization

In my front yard is a very large northern red oak (I believe, could be wrong), about 50 years old. It's showing some signs of stress, lately. I have ruled out most fungal infections, because it definitely isn't dying. However, it has never received any personalized attention; it's been left to do its own thing for a long time, now. I was hoping someone could share any experience they have for a fertilization regimen ... general feeding, fertilization to help it resist disease, what to use to help it prepare for the winter ... etc.
Any ideas are greatly appreciated.
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" snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com" wrote:

Oaks tend NOT to be heavy feeders. If your oak is stressed, the best thing would be to call a professional arborist. Check the arborist's credentials (e.g., license, certification). Considering what a 50-year-old oak is worth, the cost of professional help is easily justified.
NO, I'm not an arborist or involved with any association of arborists.
--

David E. Ross
<URL:http://www.rossde.com/
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On 11 Aug 2005 08:56:41 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com"

I suspect the problem is due to weather. We had a lot of rain early and since then drought. I don't think I'd fertilize until early spring, if needed. I'd bet the water table is lower than usual and that's the problem.
Thunder
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On 11 Aug 2005 08:56:41 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com"

Spread 1/2" to 1" manure compost over your entire lawn/beds twice a year. This will feed the soil, which will feed the tree in turn. Your grass and other plants will benefit as well. Chemical fertilizers are unneccessary.
Also, make sure the tree is not planted too deeply--there should be visible flares at the base of the trunk where the primary roots begin. If you can't see them, dig out the excess soil until you can. Cut any roots that cross over and constrict the flares. Once you have visible flares, mulch around the trunk with 3" of wood chips, pine bark, or similar and keep it mulched (i.e., keep the grass back as far as possible from the tree). Don't heap the mulch against the tree (this may be difficult if you just dug out a moat around a deep tree, but you need to find a way to do it). For more info on mulching, visit www.treesaregood.com.
But you don't say what the signs of stress are, so I reserve judgment on whether there is anything else needed to help your tree.
Keith Babberney ISA Certified Arborist #TX-236
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