NWF Certification. . .grr. . . .

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On 5 Sep 2006 14:30:08 -0700, "Sparky Organic"

Because I love the work of the NWF and WWF I'm screwing someone on their staff? What is it I don't get? That the NWF doesn't screw people the way you clearly implied?
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On 5 Sep 2006 14:30:08 -0700, "Sparky Organic"

Ah, okay...you're a nutter. RUN along
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On 5 Sep 2006 07:32:57 -0700, "Sparky Organic"

Yeah, and a Master Gardener is given a certificate after they do slave labor for a certain amount of work, physical hours of work. Then, each year to maintain your status, you must do it every year.
When you walk out a Master Gardener you know basic information. I have that certification in three states.
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wrote:

If it's based on slave labor, I must be a master gardener, based on the amount of work I do in my gardens. 33+ years of this, and I've got the calluses to show for it.
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On Tue, 05 Sep 2006 19:18:10 GMT, "JoeSpareBedroom"

Don't side step this one. I know what I'm talking about as I taught part of the MG program at one time. The program requires you to do a certain amount of hours of labor in order to qualify for the title. At one time it was 50 hours on THEIR programs, not your garden.
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wrote:

I'm not sidestepping anything, nor am I commenting on the value of the program. How is the physical work you described different from what some of us do at home? Without knowing anything about what I've grown (or killed) for over 30 years, it's hard to say one path to knowledge is better than another, ya know?
My only negativity here comes from the OP's comments about other peoples' desire to have a little certificate saying their yard is something special. I agree with him, frankly, but at the same time, I wonder why have a piece of paper saying you're a master gardener, unless you intend to use it in volunteer work, or perhaps as part of getting a job in that field? If you're not doing either of those things, why isn't your own evaluation of your knowledge good enough? You may know more about peonies or rheum palmatum than someone else who's only well versed about lawn weeds.
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On Tue, 05 Sep 2006 20:41:21 GMT, "JoeSpareBedroom"

You man the booth at the county fair, do filing in the office, answer phones, do weeding, etc. Hardly a learning experiennce. I wouldn't work in an office.

No, you cannot use it to get a job in the field of horticulture because it means nothing. If you answer the question on the application by saying, "yes, I want to be certified to get a job in the field," you are usually turned down. They do not want professionals in the program.
The Certified Backyard Wildlife Habitat is something else. I have my yard certified so when people bitch about my plants, which appeal to animals and birds are there for birds to eat, they can't sue me for removing them once they go to seed. Sure it looks ragged at this time of year, but I have many wild birds swinging on spent sunflowers, and that's why I have that sign on my garden.
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wrote:

Some towns have rules about "messy" yards, so complaints may actually result in a visit from a zoning droid. Does the certification help minimize the *legal* threat, as opposed to just complaints from neighbors?
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On Wed, 06 Sep 2006 12:45:47 GMT, "JoeSpareBedroom"

Yes, absolutely. It has to be both Texas Parks and Wildlife AND NWF Certified. Most people here out of 31 homes all know I have to let it go wild and scruffy for a period which many plants set seed. Sometime in September we'll go out and neaten up.
They sure do love the entire lawn and street strips in spring when the Bluebonnets are thick with color.
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The Master Gardener program was started in King county in the state of Washington in 1972. There are now programs in all 50 states.
Learn more here: http://king.wsu.edu/gardening/BecomeaMG.html
--

Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
USDA Zone 8
  Click to see the full signature.
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My yard is both WWF and Texas Parks and Wildlife Certified. I have many snakes, about 30 species of birds, inluding a road runner, woodpeckers, cuckoo bird and her broods yearly, a great blue heron atop one of our largest trees, a female grey fox with her pups, etc. No neigbors have anything close to this. It doesn't cost 25 for a sign. It's included in the 15 from my recallation.
To slander this organization is disgusting.
On 5 Sep 2006 05:31:33 -0700, "Sparky Organic"

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Your garden sounds similar to mine. I'm sorry you can't understand my original point, but oh well.
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