Norway Maple - Northern California

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I recall a few months back that I was involved in a discussion about replacing a tree in my front yard. During the discussion, I pretty much decided to select a Norway Maple.
I'm nearly ready to purchase that tree, but have one more question. Do any of you know, if Norwa Maples do well in Sacramento - Northern California (no snow, but lots of summer heat)?
Thank you!
Myrl Jeffcoat http://www.myrljeffcoat.com
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Many tree problems are associated with the following: They are Case Sensitive.
Troubles in the Rhizosphere http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/shigo/RHIZO.html
Unhealthy Trees from the Nursery / Improper Planting http://home.ccil.org/~treeman/sub1.html and Look up "Tree Planting" http://www.treedictionary.com
Improper Mulching - http://home.ccil.org/~treeman/sub3.html and http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/M/ Look up "Mulch"
Improper Pruning http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/tree_pruning
Improper Fertilization (See A Touch of Chemistry) http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/shigo/CHEM.html
Tree Farming and Related Problems http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/SOUND /
Sincerely, John A. Keslick, Jr. Consulting Arborist http://home.ccil.org/~treeman and www.treedictionary.com Beware of so-called tree experts who do not understand tree biology. Storms, fires, floods, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions keep reminding us that we are not the boss.

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The Norway Maple is on many states' invasive plant list. I'd pick another tree.
--
Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
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Back to the drawing board. . .Do you happen to know of any other trees that would be similar in appearance, but wouldn't be considered "invasive"???
That term "invasive" reminds me too much of the worm and mole problem, I'm also experiencing;-(
Myrl Jeffcoat http://www.myrljeffcoat.com
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Myrl wrote:

Norway maple is no more invasive than any other maple, all maples can be considered invasive, equally. And with Norway maple "invasive" is subjective, depends on point of view. Only a small handful of New England states are promoting the Norway maple as invasive and for purely selfish political and economic reasons. The economy of those few states relies heavily on cottage industry maple syrup and fall foliage tourists, they simply are too greedy to share, they want only particular maples to invade their landscape.
You live in California, where all sorts of plants are heavily controlled for political and economic purposes too, probably moreso than anywhere else on the planet... why should you care about what hue the fall foliage is in New England, on your property plant what you like. And as residential landscape specimens no tree is invasive. And there are many forms of Norway maple, some are considered butt ugly, others majestic... consider your existing landscape and the space you can devote to a rather large tree... when planting any tree choose carefully... don't permit those who are prejudiced against Norwegians and their yellow leafed trees decide your fate.
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Myrl wrote:

Most all trees propagate by volunteers.
With Norway maple invasiveness has entirely to do with those who are unwilling to share any space whatsoever that the trees they're preferrential to occupy, it's strictly about money and politics, not a whit to do with ecology. A weed is any plant growing where one doesn't want it to grow, even if only a few dandilions in a blue grass lawn but has nothing to do with invasiveness (actually the grass is what's invasive). It's not politically correct to call a tree a weed, however it's politically potent to label a tree invasive... the only thing the Norway maple invades is certain self centered individual's pocketbooks. When a very particularly hued fall palate lures many tourists to spend many dollars and a major seasonal income is derived from tapping another particular tree (which can easily be deemed invasive except thst if produces dollars) then the folks who stand to benefit most whether by money or vote or both will say anything to protect their positions. Now someone try to convince me that politicians are truthful and business people aren't greedy.
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this, but I guess I'll have to do it again.
Follow any of these links to see how bad Norway Maples actually are. http://www.google.com/search?q=Norway+Maple+Invasive&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a
Then I would go to a local nursery and discuss your needs with them. They will be able to give you better, more specific recommendations than I can, since I'm on the right coast and you're on the left :o)
--
Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
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In both of his excellent books, the late Henry Mitchell described the Norway maple in terms similar to those used by people who find out that a registered sex offender is moving in next door. Pick a different tree. I can't recommend any.
When you contacted this organization using a telephone, and asked them about other tree ideas, what did they recommend? http://cesacramento.ucdavis.edu /
You didn't contact them?
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It appears that I will be contacting the Sacramento Tree Society. They sponsor programs and give free trees, complete with education about how to plant them. I've watched enough of my neighbors, who have attended these sessions, and know how to dig the hole with the little stoop, etc. But, I haven't really been impressed with the quality of the "free" trees, they deliver.
However, I think now, it would be worthwhile for me to attend one of those sessions - even if I were to select a good quality tree from another source.
I have a little time. . .I still need to have a very old mistletoe infested Modesto Ash removed.
I recall that I hoaned in on a Norway Maple, from a discussion on this board a few months back. One of the posters, had said the Norway dropped less "helicoptors" and seed pods, than the other Maples. I think originally, I was thinking of a Silver Maple!
I'm still trying to figure out what an "invasive" tree does? Does that mean it volunteers, and sends out seedlings far and wide?
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The Norway maple will have a shallow root system, and eventually, nothing will grow under the tree but weeds. People sometimes try and create raised beds under these trees, filling the area with soil. The tree laughs and sends its roots upward, thereby creating the same situation as before. It's not a tree for a residential property unless the property is huge and you don't care what goes on under the tree.
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I've got a very beautiful Norway Maple in my yard. Yes it has plenty of seeds and yes they virttually all sprout and yet after 30 yrs its still the only Norway Maple around in a forest of Oak and Walnut trees. I even had tried to transplant some of those seedlings to other spots. THe local deer population think the seedlings are delicious. Nothing survives more than a season. I had one survive to about 10ft tall before a deer decided to rub his antlers on it. Killed it good (the tree not the deer). Quite frankly, I don't see how anything propagates with the hungry hoard around.

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Exactly. I had a huge crimson king Norway maple growing at the rear of my house when I moved in, was too large and too close so sadly I had it removed, that was four years ago, the tree was there some 45 years. There isn't even one other crimson king Norway maple within a thousand yards of that spot... the only other one I've seen nearby is like a half mile down the road in someone's front yard, even larger than the one I had removed. The only other evidence left is that somehow there are two small seedlings seemingly surviving (barely) under my rear deck... the deer can't get to them, neither can I unless I undo the lath skirting around my deck. There are lots of other critters that munch seedlings like they're candy, rabbits do a good job, but especially woodchucks. There's a fat woodchuck living under a brush pile past my barn, I've seen Woody very methodically track down every seedling within the approximately three acre domain he seems to have marked as his... maybe a her, never got close enough to check.... probably a her, Woody has a wide rear! LOL There's a medium sized common Norway maple growing right behind my barn, don't even notice it until fall when suddenly it turns a blinding bright yellow, it's those seedings that Woody devours every spring... I think Woody even chases the deer from those seedlings... only the Albino skunk that lives somewhere around chases everyone off just by passing through, but I don't think skunks eat seedlings, least I've never noticed that gorgeous snow white beast eating anything... very elusive, only spot it very occasionally and very briefly before it scampers off, I'd love to get a picture. Snapped a picture of a great blue heron yesterday perched atop my Norwegian yellow barn.... never seen one up there before, typically they're stalking in the tall reeds near my pond or all of a sudden go flying by, so even though it's not a great shot (wouldn't turn round) but I was glad to get this picture just before it flew off.
http://i14.tinypic.com/54jc4t2.jpg
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BS
BS
It's
Whadadya mean what goes on, aintcha ever enjoyed getting laid under the spreading chestnut tree? LOL
Um, that's true of any tree, small, medium, or large... they provide shade, but plenty of plants like growing in shade, even in the understory of a dense pine forest, and under a large shade tree makes a great spot for a nicely planted water feature (much easier to plant under a large tree than a small tree). The OP never mentioned having limited space, why do you automatically assume he lives on a 40' x 60' city lot.... could just as easily assume he lives on 5 acres, or more... don't judge others by where you live, in someone's spare bedroom... no, you can't plant a Norway maple tree in a pot on your basement window sill. LOL
Since the OP asked about a Norway maple I would assume he knows how large they grow, considered it, and knows he has the space. I've planted many large growing shade trees, I have the space. Having a spare acre it would look stupid if all I planted smack dab in the center was a mugho pine... even an unthinking pinhead has to admit it would make far more aesthetic sense to plant a Norway maple or even a London planetree. And with appropriate pruning it's real easy to have a beautiful thick lawn growing right up to the trunks of large shade trees... you will see that in parks all the time... you've likely just now searched and read some worst case scenarios but obviously have no personal first hand experience. Large shade trees are gorgeous when given adequate room (not eked out spare room), you reek of sour grapes.
Large shade trees can even grow beautifully crowded close together, even along city streets:
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/65316 /
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wrote:

Sorry, Shelly, but I've seen this happen in at least a half dozen instances. Now, if you have an acre or more, and you can stick the tree far from any other plantings you might want, I'm sure it would be fine.
This cannot be debated. I never lie and I'm always right. You, on the other hand, are over it. Way over it.
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LOL - I have never seen you two go at it like this on the "Cooking" newsgroup;-)
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wrote:

If he gives incorrect advice for cooking, the mistake only lasts a little while, or until the leftovers are gone. A tree is a different story.
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You guys are killin' me;-). . .Play nice kids, it's just a tree;-) At least you guys are interested in planting trees. I have had a couple of relationships with guys that seem hell bent on chain sawing them down. I came to the realization, they may have not wanted any trees out there standing taller than their's;-(
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On Thu, 13 Sep 2007 17:57:48 GMT, "JoeSpareBedroom"

Et tu, Joe?
The attitude of *most* of us on the USENET, eh? ;-)
Charlie
--
"A little rudeness and disrespect can elevate a
meaningless interaction into a battle of wills
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<Charlie> wrote in message wrote:

But Charlie - it's true! I'm always right. :-)
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You must be wrong about some things , Joe, because your name is not Sheldon (blame your parents for that, but it's never too late to change).
Sheldette.
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