Newbie gardener

Hi all, My wife and I are going to finally start doing some sort or form of gardening. Aside from flowers and shrubs we decided to try growing some cherry tomatoes in pots. We bought some plants about 8-12" in hight and how are stuck with the now what question? Any tips on what to do with the plans after we transplant them into larger pots. Fertilizer etc... needed? Thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 16 May 2005 15:04:13 -0400, Ottawa wrote:

Give them 2 weeks in the pot then start fertilizing. Follow lable directions. Lots of sunlight. Make sure you water them as soil dries out faster in pots then in the gorund.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Put then in a spot that gets at least 6 hours of sun. Keep them evenly moist. Use about a tablespoon of fertilizer per pot each week once they start growing. You will probably have to stake them or use a tomato cage or they will sprawl.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
This is all just my opinion gathered from my experience. I have been gardening a while and have never had any luck with potted tomatoes. I would suggest finding a place to put them in the ground. I know pots can be done but down here in Texas I think the plants get baked in the afternoon and never do well. They grow great in the ground. If you are new to gardening I don't want you to get discouraged by potted tomatoes. Good luck and have fun. James
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There are some advantages to growing tomatoes (and other veggies) in pots. First of all, you can move them to a spot where they will do well. If you think they are getting too much or too little sun, you can move them. Containers can dry out, but you use far less water then you would if you were watering them in the ground. Also, it is easier to control weeds and apply fertilizer. I have had great luck growing tomatoes, pepper, eggplants, cucumber, and zucchinis in pots on my deck.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's a good reason to go for a pot that looks ridiculously large when it's empty at the store, and makes you say "Jeez...we don't need one THAT big". Yeah...you do. It won't dry out as quickly while everyone's at work.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ottawa wrote:

You should plant the tomatoes with only about 4 inches above the soil level. Remove the leaves from the stem first. Roots will grow from the stem under the soil and will give you a much better plant.
--

Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
USDA Zone 8
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No need to repeat what others have said. But, mulch the surface of the soil with something organic, like lawn grass clippings (from lawn that has NOT been treated with any pesticides or herbicides). Or, buy a bag of shredded cedar or hardwood mulch. Achieves two purposes: Helps maintain even moisture. If tomato plants get dry, and are then watered, and go through repeated episodes like this, the tomato skins may crack. And, since your plants will already be at a disadvantage being in pots, they need all the help they can get. The second purpose for the mulch is so that when the tomatoes fall off, they'll stay cleaner than if they were on bare soil.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.