New show on PBS, P. Allen Smith?

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The Canada shows work well for much of the northeast and some for the northwest but the southern shows really are only useful for a small part of the south. The Southwest is not shown at all and that is where you really need a good show to point out how to grow plants in an arid climate. I can't believe that places like Phenoix REQUIRE that you have grass in your front yard. That may have changed but that was how it was at one time.
And I agree that the budgets for the make-over shows are unbelievable. It is possible that I have spent that much my entirely life (55 years) but I have a hard time believing it. Some of my favorite plants are those I rescued from the street where people had dug them up and thrown them away. My best trees are those that came up from seed and that I transplanted when there were no more than a foot tall or just let them grow where they were. My little white pine that I rescued from a neighbor when it was nothing more than a candle now towers over the 5' white pines that I planted at the same time. Our city now makes people cut up their yard waste before picking it up so I have lost my source of rescue plants..... Such a waste and such a loss of entertainment.
DKat
says...

they
missed
yesterday
shown
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Ya know what's interesting....when I go into shops now and look at plants which are full grown. I compare them to my full grown plants. Then I look at the price. I have to say that buying plants small and letting time make them sizeable is the single most cost effective way to make your property worth more.
I saw a plumeria the other day as large as mine (8feet with three lateral branches) and it was 200 dollars. I don't know "who" would pay that, but it only took my 5 dollar, 6" pot size plumeria two years to get that large.
I've seen brugmansia in 10 inch pots for THREE HUNDRED dollars! Of course, that is at a very exclusive garden center in Austin called "GARDENS."
So, now I am propagating cuttings and making money for my habit.
As for grass in Arizona, it's the dumbest I've ever seen. That and big, annoying rose gardens using new roses, not even old fashioned. Yick.
My landscape has way more than 75% native plants and everyone who sees it thinks it's a tropical looking garden. There is nothing tropical in it, unless you consider cannas. However, they are hardy perennials here.
So, I suppose we're lucky to have a local garden show on PBS called Central Texas Gardener.
Victoria

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Yes, I think what people tend to forget is that the larger the plant the larger the root loss and the longer for recovery. I had always read that smaller plants do better but it really never hit home until I experienced first hand with the 1' tree vs the 5' tree. I still have a hard time believing that the little thing managed to outgrow almost every one of the 5footers I put in that year.
Cuttings are magic. My problem has been that I tend to get absentminded and not to baby them as I should that first year and they die off on me. I'm told that you really need to have a special spot put aside just for your cuttings where they don't have to compete with anything and then transplant them. I suppose if you did that for just the first year you would minimize the root damage of transplanting.....
DKat
says...

early.
to
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In my experience both professionally and personally, planting anything in the fall can almost completely eliminate any and all problems of transplant shock. All perennials have some part of their structure growing all winter. Trees develop roots all year, especially in winter, in the south.
In my case, I have a greenhouse. It's big enough to have a little misting area set up for cuttings. I'm fortunate to have a wide array of local garden centers who love native plants and some exotic specimens like brugmansia, so I have a source to sell them to. I normally trade for the most excellently produced compost in America. The Natural Gardener in Austin makes their compost the way Dr. Elaine Ingham prescribes on her website, www.soilfoodweb.com
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I want a greenhouse (greenhouse envy grows rapidly).... MUST HAVE GREEN HOUSE ......
opined:

the
and
transplant
minimize
the
shock.
Trees
area
centers
have a

produced
the way

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Yes, a greenhouse is a delightful thing! Mine is 10'x20' and I wish it was bigger. This year I built shelves which gives me much more space than I had. Living in a southern state makes it easier to heat in winter to keep frost out of there. Last night I put the heater on just in case. We have a light frost this morning.
My greenhouse was relatively inexpensive at about 700 dollars. They have more expensive hard sided houses made of polycarbonate, but I love mine.
V
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The probable reason many people go for the "big" plants is because they want instant gratification. I was at a local garden center this week and watched a woman load her cart with a half dozen big plants in full bloom, passing over the ones that were in bud and just beginning to open. I was about to say something but resisted because it was obvious she could afford her purchases. Many people treat purchased plants in the same manner they treat cut flowers. When the blossoms fade, they are discarded. That's definitely a plus for growers! <G>

and
transplant
minimize
I agree with you about the magic of cuttings. I start many cuttings from shrubs that are sold at a fund raiser for our garden club, concentrating on those that do well in our area. I start them one spring and they are sold that fall or the following spring. The only cuttings I've had survival problems with are viburnums that I started in the spring and planted in the fall. If they are held until the following spring or fall, they generally survive in their new homes.
Once the cuttings root, I really baby them, which means I usually have 90% survival rate. Occasionally I have a healthy, rooted cutting die, which really irritates me. I contacted a friend who teaches propagation classes at an area university to ask why they failed. The gist of her reply was "s**t happens! <G>
John
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of
[snip]
I love the Gardener's journal, but for a show on canada, Kathy never seems to make it lower than zone 5 and seems to spend a lot of show in places like niagra on the lake or places that are even warmer. Just once I would have liked to see the show profile gardening in Alberta or Manitoba.
There was a Minnesota based show sponsored by the horticultural society and the U of MN but it doesn't seem to be on any more, probably axed by budget cuts. The Great Lakes Gardener is a joke. I watched a couple of episodes and when the host spent a whole show at a hardware store trying out different chainsaws I gave up watching.
Gardening by the Yard on HGTV is done in Oklahoma and amid all the jokes, the guy seems to highlight plants that are good for hot arid climates.
mm
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wrote:

But there is only four days out of the year that the snow cover is gone and it is hard to shoot a show in four days. ;-)
zhan
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tacky decoration and crafts shows.
We tacky s'uthuners resemble that! ;-)
Jim Lewis - snipped-for-privacy@nettally.com - Tallahassee, FL - Apples and Oranges: A Demonstration -- Welcome to Hooterville! Population: 2000. Elevation: 3000. Established: 1850. TOTAL = 6850 -- Bob Lilienfield
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I'm sorry... I didn't mean to imply that southerners were tacky.... they have tacky northern stuff too... its just that the tacky shows are based out of the south .... 8(..... (so glad southerners have good sense of fun and humor)....
- Tallahassee, FL - Apples and

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out
if you want a PERFECT example of Southern tacky........and a GREAT book-----hunt down Passalong Plants co-written by Steven Bender and Felder Rushing. Hilarious, informative and worth adding to your garden book collection. It's printed thru Chapel Hill Press. They've devoted a whole chapter to Southern tacky yard art.............. maddie
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On 1/21/04 10:08 AM, in article 400eac53 snipped-for-privacy@news.vic.com, "John Catron"

I'll second the recommendation! What a fun, fun book! I hope to add a dragon egg to my yard soon and maybe a CD tree in back where only I and children get to look at it! Cheryl
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- Tallahassee, FL - Apples and

My garden flamingo's that Zhan has brought me agree!! (then add the fairies that perch on or near the BBQ pit fountain, the stakes that look like frogs made of metal and large green glass shooter marbles for eyes stuck into pots of perennials out front and the rainbow wind thing that turns and moves with the rudder, and tacky Southern is one of my many identifiable markings! The only thing I DON'T have is the painted, turned inside out of cut tire for a planter............which actually works quite well as it's raised, insulated by the rubber and doesn't have to be painted white. I'd personally love to have one of them as an instant bed..............
madgardener who has quite a flock of flamingo's growing up on the ridge, back in fairy holler in Eastern Tennessee
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Yeah I was happy to have the gardener's journal back even if in reruns. It's such a great visual show that it is fun to see it again. Cathy Renwald is great at pointing out the little treasures here and there in the perennial border. Last year, I tried Angelica Gigas, although I planted it too late and hope for better luck from a wintered over plant I saved from last year. This year I am trying wild indigo (baptisia) thanks to the show.
mm
says...

awesome
it
(I
at 7

have
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On 1/18/04 9:57 AM, in article 400ab717 snipped-for-privacy@news.vic.com, "madgardener"

She was great wasn't she! I also really liked the older couple from Michigan (I think). They could be such a hoot!

I can not stand the new show. It talks down to the viewer.

It was better than the current format of Iron Chef meets guy with nervous laugh. Or an numeric scale of 10 being perfect segment, Marion was 4 and the new one is a -10!
Cheryl
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opined:

Those were the elderly couple from Watertown, NY. I think they were Brits. I don't imagine they are on any more. They were in their 80s 17 years ago! They always tripped over the dogs. I loved them.
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On 1/18/04 4:24 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com,

Ok - I knew they were on a lake and someplace COLD; I know Watertown, NY.
C
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