Need help as have rodent tunnel system under veggie garden

Have tried traps, Smoke from flares, dog droppings, ammonia in rags, moth balls but they keep coming back. It is a lot of work to surround my garden in buried chicken wire.
Help suggestions needed. No obvious mounds, tunnels 6-8 inches deep in clay soil.
Thanks gardener
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Years ago we lived on heavy London clay. The moles were a pest because of the mole hills, but their tunnels did provide a very good drainage system.
--
David Hill
Abacus nurseries
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Moth balls. Good. Continue with whatever poison you find laying around the house. It's a vegetable garden. What's the diff? :-) :-)
But seriously....how about doing a lot more research before risking your health and that of your family?
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Little more information needed. Can you identify the animal making the tunnels? I assume if they're 6-8" deep it's not woodchucks, but is it moles, voles, or what? Are they eating roots, veggies, or plants or just insects? In other words, why do they bother you?
Fitz Grips wrote:

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Didn't you ever see the cartoons in which the animals, in the wink of an eye, pull the entire carrot down into the ground with a WHOOSH? It's a terrible thing. :-)

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When I was about 5 years old and helping my grandmother in her vegetable garden I watched an entire celery plant go slowly down into the ground as a gopher pulled it, not with a WHOOSH, but gone nevertheless.
When we moved back to CA after living in Ohio where we didn't have to deal with gophers, I had forgotten about them. I was quickly reminded of them one morning as I went out to check on the first tomato fruit that was just turning red, when I arrived in time to see the last of the plant ( and alas, the tomato also) disappear into the ground!
Now I do not plant a tomato, or a rose, without the protection of an underground wire cage or "basket" which I make from welded wire with 1 inch square openings. A whole section of the wire can be laid flat on the ground and a raised bed with solid sides built on top of the wire to keep gophers out.
I had so many wire baskets in the front yard flower bed, that when the water man came to check for pipes, his metal detector went crazy!!!
Emilie NorCal
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Fitz Grips wrote:

I'm thinking a cat would be in order, or possibly a type of terrier bred for ratting.
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A cat, I can see. But a dog? That's trading his problem for a curse worse than death.
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On Thu, 14 Oct 2004 14:32:29 -0400, Chelsea Christenson

Excellent idea! I had so many chipmunks in the backyard that they, with thier territorial calls which I call "johnny one-note" were really getting irritating. A neighborhood cat found my backyard was an excellent source of nutrients. He got larger, fatter and sleeker as my backyard quieted down.
FACE
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the paths around my garden where they come in from other community gardens and inside my garden my foot sinks, my water path sinks into a hole and they just push up a little inch high bump every 8-10 feet in solid soil. I can probe and find their tunnel system and dig down nect to the perimeter path for the flares and stuff to keep them out. So I have a 60X60 foot garden and that is a lot of wire but guess I gotta since no big gopher snakes in the area. Could I pay postage for a big one? Smile
JP<
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On 15 Oct 2004 23:12:54 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@castles.com (Fitz Grips) in rec.gardens wrote:

Had voles too. Never saw one but we asked the nursery what would eat the roots off of roses (from the bottom up) and they said voles. Years ago i used to see something advertised for voles and moles called something like "hav-a-trap" that you put over their runs. Never used it or really saw one but it was definitely not of the "animal-friendly" <G> type. Sort of a steel cat lying in wait. Seems it was a spring loaded spike pointed downwards that was tripped by motion underneath it. Also, I have no idea if it would be taken into the vegetables, but since your first message i have wondered about a little common rat poison down the holes. If it is taken up by the plants, you can sit around the table and say "wow....look at all the colors" as your blood thins. (Belladonna is one of the main ingredients of common rat poison along with other nasties)
FACE
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On Sat, 16 Oct 2004 11:37:08 -0400, FACE wrote

I remember that my father had one of these when I was growing up. He set it occasionally for moles. I suppose he was an optimist, as I don't think he ever caught anything.
Ed
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like
one
Was he a fisherman? The outlook sounds similar.
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snipped-for-privacy@castles.com (Fitz Grips) wrote in message

of course they are voles and for 18 months I had terrible problems with them. I tried traps (would catch a few, but not enough). I poured a box and a half of rat poison into the tunnels, and I am quite the organic type but I was getting desperate. Exactly the same tunnels you describe, running along the bed edges, two inches in, 3-5 inches down (they could not get deeper because under the beds it is somewhat boggy). The beds, underneath, were lined with chicken wire, so they stayed above it. Finally, I dug up all beds one spring, and from that moment on I spread large amounts of predator urine. never saw a tunnel since, and it has been two growing seasons. You have to keep spreading it until they are set to a different location for winter, or continuously if you live in a milder climate.
Another thing I do religiously now is to keep the beds free of mulch until Thanksgiving, as mulch attracts them specially in winter. I also make a pile of leaves on the other side of the yard (next year's mulch), which is clearly full of voles (several neighboring cats go nowhere else when they come visit), and finally, I no longer put unfinished compost on the beds unless it is way beyond edible.
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