Natural Insect Repellants

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Yea, V, I saw that further down the thread. I've always known pyrethrum to be derived from mums, also. A google search does not turn up any mentions of marigolds producing pyrethrins at all.
--
Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
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After I typed it I figured you didn't finish reading the whole thread. No worries.
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I gave the link, twice :-)
Janet
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On Thu, 5 Apr 2007 17:52:32 +0100, Janet Baraclough

Regardless, Janet. The pesticide pyrethrum comes from the flower not the foliage and smell has absolutely nothing to do with its insecticidal properties in that it kills insects indiscriminately. Kill is kill. I don't kill knowingly. And no, I don't eat meat either.
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Jangchub wrote:

The plants themselves don't "kill", only a concentrated extract does. The plants make themselves unattractive to insects by producing it. I have feverfew in my garden and it has similar properties, it is fun to see bees bend their flight path to stay away from its flowers.
Paulo
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On Fri, 06 Apr 2007 01:41:51 GMT, Paulo da Costa

No, the flowers are crushed up and ground into powder and the entire flower is the pyrethrum which is not only poison to insects, but to most mammals, amphibians, and reptiles including birds (descendants of reptiles).
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AND it is very poisonous to fish!!!! and nearly everything in water. I cannot use anything like this near my ponds. Ingrid

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ List Manager: Puregold Goldfish List at http://weloveteaching.com/puregold / sign up: http://groups.google.com/groups/dir?hl=en&q=puregold&qt_s=Group+lookup www.drsolo.com Solve the problem, dont waste energy finding who's to blame ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ I receive no compensation for running the Puregold list or Puregold website. I do not run nor receive any money from the ads at the old Puregold site. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Zone 5 next to Lake Michigan
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Oh for sure fish are very sensitive to most anything. I am no longer using any pesticides, no killing. I have so much wildlife in my yard that the balance is incredible to me. It's interesting how when you leave it alone and let it do what it wants to do, how well it all works out. But, one caveat, I like a messy garden with some low level order. The order in the chaos, yeah, that's it.
On Fri, 06 Apr 2007 13:52:36 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@wi.rr.xx.com wrote:

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Jangchub wrote:

The oils are contained in the under developed seed casings, which are found in the flower head. The strength of the pyrethrum used will be more than likely under 1%. Which allows it to be used around mammals, amphibians, birds etc.
Lar
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Not in my backyard.
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From http://www.patentstorm.us/patents/5443978-description.html

of the Compositae (daisies, marigolds, etc.) in U.S. gardens probably produce these compounds. Probably is hardly definitive. In all other searches I found references to marigolds being used for repellent properties, but not because they produce pyrethrins. It's a very thin link if there's one at all; it's hardly worth mentioning.
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Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
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If you would care to read it, you will find that the research crops of Compositae such as marigolds etc (leaves and stems), WERE found to be a source of the same compound. Research crops are grown, and harvested, in controlled conditions, not gardens. Garden plants were not examined in the laboratory. Therefore, the research report can only suggest, that the same plants grown in gardens, will PROBABLY contain the same compounds that were found in the research-crops.
Janet.
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I can't remember where or when I first heard about photosynthesis, gravity, or chocolate cake. It hardly matters, since they all exist, and were all verified, long before I was born.
HTH
:-)
Janet
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Marigolds are a member of the family which are the natural source of pyrethrum, which was marketed as an effective insecticide. The pungent smell-quotient in marigold leaves, is the pyrethrum, so ones with the smelliest leaves, have the most insecticide. In the UK, gardeners who grow tomatoes and basil in glasshouses, often grow marigolds in there too, as a sacrifice plant to kill whitefly.
Janet.
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On Sat, 31 Mar 2007 19:22:57 +0100, Janet Baraclough

Wrong. C. coccineum is NO relation to Tagetes. You are also wrong about it being the "leaves, is the pyrethrum." Pyrethrum come from a Chrysanthamum coccineum plant and it is the crushed flowers where the poison is, not the foliage.
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The active chemical occurs in several members of the compositae family, including, chrysanthemum and marigold. See
http://www.patentstorm.us/patents/5443978-description.html
which is much too long to reproduce here, but here's a snippet
"Industrially, pyrethrum extracts are obtained by extraction of dried pyrethrum flowers with hexane followed by dewaxing and decolorization to yield a mixture containing approximately 20% pyrethrins and 80% inert plant materials or solvents. This technical extract is registered with the Environmental Protection Agency and is a standard item of commerce used for formulating numerous end products. Flower production is centered in Kenya and surrounding countries, with some production being attempted in Tasmania and New Guinea. While pyrethrum flowers are not grown commercially in the United States, some of the Compositae (daisies, marigolds, etc.) in U.S. gardens probably produce these compounds. There has been an effort to cultivate C. cinerariaefolium in Oregon and Arizona but this is not yet a viable commercial source. "
Janet.
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On Sun, 1 Apr 2007 00:21:19 +0100, Janet Baraclough

All this says is that no form of Tagetes has been formulated as a viable source, so you, me, nobody anywhere has ever used any form of Tagetes to kill insects. Pyrethrum FLOWERS is where the compound is found, not the leaves. Your post proves it.
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While pyrethrum flowers are not

No, it doesn't say that, you've misread. Try reading it again.
Janet
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Yes, and marigolds are used as companion plants with tomatoes, and they do not contain pyrethrum. The main point is that they deter certain insects that like tomatoe plants. Marigolds are not an insecticide. They are a deterrent.
dancing in my mind, gloria in hemlock hollow (only the iguanas know for sure)
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wrote:

Oy, there is ONE marigold which can control or help to control root knot nematodes. Otherwise, they are useless. You'd be much better off planting garlic or basil with tomatoes.
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