Natural Insect Repellants

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I have a backyard vineyard of about 100 vines. Does anyone know of any plants that are natural insect repellants that I could plant between the vines. I do not need a product I can eat but something that is pretty would be an added bonus.
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Marigolds are old stand-bys for that kind of thing, the smellier, the better.
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FragileWarrior wrote:

There seems to be some dissagreement on this:
http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/pests/msg0412321522908.html
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On Fri, 30 Mar 2007 22:06:26 -0400, "Paul E. Lehmann"

What about planting garlic betweent the rose bushes?
Persephone
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On Fri, 30 Mar 2007 19:10:37 -0700, Persephone wrote:

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Have you ever seen anything said on the 'net that DOESN'T have disagreement over it? :)
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On Sat, 31 Mar 2007 12:20:40 +0000 (UTC), FragileWarrior

Yes, of course. However, there is scientific research regarding the species Tagetes spp. and it is and was used for root knot nematodes not flying, crawling or jumping insects.
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Different species of tagetes are used for different deterrent purposes. Tagetes minuta is used by Organic gardeners here, to repel some weeds which spread by underground runners. Other marigolds are used to repel insects.
I've forgotten the term for plants which exude chemicals to deter other plants from colonising their space. Walnuts ,eucalypts and rhododendrons are other examples.
Janet
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On Fri, 30 Mar 2007 22:55:16 +0000 (UTC), FragileWarrior

Not true. Marigolds attract spider mites. There is only one variety of marigold which helps prevent root knot nematodes IN the soil. Where did you get "the smellier, the better" from?
The way farmers do it in organic method farming is to plant catch crops for whatever insect. Here, for example, aphids adore the young Guara lindheimeri, so those get planted in order to then attract lady beetles...etc.
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I have never ever ever ever seen a spider mite on a marigold. Ever. I say this in a seriousness.

everything I have seen and heard and read and watched. I'm working on it tho'. I hope to master it before I die.

So, by that logic, then Marigolds COULD work under the right conditions, right?
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On Sat, 31 Mar 2007 12:24:07 +0000 (UTC), FragileWarrior

Spider mites are microscopic. They cover from top to bottom any marigold I've ever planted. They are used in farming as catch crops to draw the attention of spider mites. I say this in all factualness (not a real word I don't think)

If you don't remember where you heard something why would you pass it on as fact? One thing I'm learning is to not advise based on my own BS, but to advise based on the facts. I believe your heart was in the right place, but I do not think you gave good information regarding this subject.

Not in the way you said they work. They do not repel insects, rather attract them thus farmers use them as catch crops. So, the answer to your last question is no, by no logic do marigolds work under the right conditions to repel insects.
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Actually, I said it tongue in cheek. *sigh* The printed word is SUCH a limiting medium.
May all your authoritive advice always be right on the money and may you never, ever, EVER make a mistake. Carry on!
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On Sat, 31 Mar 2007 18:46:59 +0000 (UTC), FragileWarrior

I always make mistakes all day long all the time every day. However, Tagetes and pyrethrum have absolutely nothing to do with one another.
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Isn't arrogance fun?
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On Sat, 31 Mar 2007 21:48:32 +0000 (UTC), FragileWarrior

I don't find anything fun about arrogance. However, the information was wrong and it can be proven wrong with a simple search about the species Tagetes and Chrysanthumum. They are not the same. If that is arrogant of me to point this out, I'd have to say the arrogance is a reflection of you.
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wrote:

Ah, is pride fun, too?
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Nobody said they were the same. I said, they are in the same plant family (compositae). A simple search will show you that/
Marigolds contain the same insecticidal compounds as chrysanthemum
http://www.patentstorm.us/patents/5443978-description.html
Janet
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On Sun, 1 Apr 2007 00:33:42 +0100, Janet Baraclough

Janet, you said the pesticide was in the leaves and something to the effect of smellier the better or some such thing.
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Actually, no, in Message-ID:

Second response in this thread.
--
Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
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Ann, Janet said the pesticidal properties were in the leaves of the marigold, which she said was pyrethrum. That is not true, and inaccurate. It is not a common marigold which produces the pesticide pyrethrum, but the mum and the pesticide is in the flowers not stems of foliage.
v
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