Nasturtiums grew wildly this year

It is intereting how much small differences can vary results. I planted the same nasturtiums from the same seed packet as last year in the same spot. They weren't as crowded as last year and they grew like wildfire.
Just two plants grew up to 18 feet vines that snaked into every hole. They even went through a crevice between the wood frame and stone, grew under the steps and came out through an alcove. Another set of them also grew well in a new bed. Another variety--salmon colored were overwhelmed by this type and did little. A variegated version grew into nice compact bushes.
Compact Variegated version: http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/royalfrazier/detail?.dir=/c8d7&.dnm Őd9.jpg&.src=ph
Monster Nasturtiums: http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/royalfrazier/detail?.dir=/c8d7&.dnm Ś09.jpg&.src=ph Those slate blocks are 3 feet long by comparison.
Unfortunately I had to take them down today cause I finally had time to do some garden work. The Nasturtiums (which also grew five feet vertically) intertwined with tomatoes and grape vines. I needed to get them all untangled. They all are still growing and flowering a week before Halloween in Zone 6b. Last year my Nasturtiums go overrun with aphids and I just yanked them.
DiGiTAL ViNYL (no email) Zone 6b/7, Westchester Co, NY, <1 mile off L.I.Sound 2nd year gardener http://photos.yahoo.com/ph/royalfrazier /
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DigitalVinyl wrote:

Yes, I had wonderful success with mine this year in my area (zone 7), in both pots and in the beds. I had it completely overtake the catnip under my protective cage (damn ferals!), and it really made my patio pots stand out. I really love them. Here's some pics if you want to see. They're in there somewhere. :)
http://www.buzzys.net/gardens2004
Buzzy
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wrote:

Love the photos of your garden, Digital. You've had some amazing successes. You *do* know that nasturtiums are edible, don't you?
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Yeah, I seem to recall trying some last year. The taste didn't stand out in my mind one way or the other.
DiGiTAL ViNYL (no email) Zone 6b/7, Westchester Co, NY, <1 mile off L.I.Sound 2nd year gardener http://photos.yahoo.com/ph/royalfrazier /
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wrote:

I don't think any edible flowers are prized for their taste, but simply being decorative elements you can add to food without haveing to pick out before eating. Nasturtiums and daylilies are very dramatic additions to green salads.
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actually, it's the leaves that are really good. they have the texture of spinach, and the flavor of radishes. they're best when young.
-kelly
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On Sat, 23 Oct 2004 16:20:25 -0700, "culprit"

I find most of the non-traditional edibles (plantain, dandelion, nasturtium) to be too bitter for me. I understand nasturtium seeds can also be used or pickled at some stage as a caper substitute. I just prefer the flowers as spots of edible decor. :-)
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DigitalVinyl wrote [in part]:

I planted nasturtiums from seed in 1993 on My Hill. They reseed and come back every year.
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David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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I certainly wouldn't mind volunteers, they are a great trap crop for aphids. I'm still developing growing beds. I reworked the ground a bit this year early in the season, so I haven't really given stuff a chance to reseed easily(except weeds). Next year I may have more volunteers. Last years Violas popped up everywhere (especially between bricks) and some dill came up.
DiGiTAL ViNYL (no email) Zone 6b/7, Westchester Co, NY, <1 mile off L.I.Sound 2nd year gardener http://photos.yahoo.com/ph/royalfrazier /
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wow, that is a long vine. I have tried nasturtiums and never got them grow that long. Did you use anything like plant food or just let them go?

http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/royalfrazier/detail?.dir=/c8d7&.dnm Őd9.jpg&.src=ph
http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/royalfrazier/detail?.dir=/c8d7&.dnm Ś09.jpg&.src=ph
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<Heather> wrote:>wow, that is a long vine. I have tried nasturtiums and never got them grow

Last year I mixed a lot of amendments which included fertilizer into this soil (greensand, aged manure, humus, aluminim sulfate, triple phosphates). I conditioned the soil down 18". This year I may have sprinkled some of those 3-5 month fertilizer pellets. I didn't track my garden well this year. I also used a liquid seaweed fertilizer on the garden once a month, twice during heavy fruit bearing months. But the conditions were pretty much the smae or better last year--just more crowded. These things just reached out all over the place.
DiGiTAL ViNYL (no email) Zone 6b/7, Westchester Co, NY, <1 mile off L.I.Sound 2nd year gardener http://photos.yahoo.com/ph/royalfrazier /
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The conventional wisdom on nasturtiums is not that they don't like fertilizer - merely that they will produce lusher, bigger foliage and fewer flowers than they do in poorer soil. That being said, the nasturtiums I planted in rich potting soil are HUGE and flower-laden right now - and since I planted the vining/trailing variety, have now made a carpet 4-6 feet around every pot. I also planted some seeds in a dry-shade area with some difficult root competition issues as an experiment - and they did nothing all summer long. Only one has bloomed - a single bloom. /
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This year was indeed a great year for nasturtiums. From my direct seedings I now have plants all over my property, still blooming strong.
Best of all, I've got literally hundreds of seeds for next year. BTW, the flowers are mildly spicy, the leaves a little more so, but try the seeds - these things are hot! A cross between mustard seed, ginger and hot pepper.
Greg Toronto, Ont. US Zone 5
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snipped-for-privacy@rogers.com (Greg Miller) wrote in

I was given some seeds this year. The packet says, do not fertilize, loves poor quality soil. So I found a section of poor quality soil that needed cover. Sadly the seeds germinated, grew a couple of mature leaves. After a couple of months I planted them in a large planter and they are blooming, albeit really late.
I tried a flower and tasted delicious. I was told to stuff them with cream cheese and chives. I will when I get a few more blooms!
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