my town is run by commies!

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My town's new in-ground irrigation ORDINANCE:
THE PERMIT FEE SHALL BE TWO HUNDRED DOLLARS ($200.00). ADDITIONALLY THE APPLICANT SHALL OBTAIN A PLUMBING PERMIT FROM FREDERICK COUNTY.
They even specify the controller:
SUCH TECHNOLOGICAL DEVICES, SOMETIMES REFERRED TO AS "SMART CONTROLLERS", SHALL INCLUDE: (A) RAIN SENSORS WHICH PREVENT THE USE OF THE SYSTEMS DURING RAIN OR OTHER PRECIPITATION EVENTS. (B) GROUND SENSORS WHICH MEASURE THE MOISTURE IN THE SOIL TO AVOID UNNECESSARY USE OF THE SYSTEM WHEN THE GROUND MOISTURE IS HIGH; AND A. PROGRAMMABLE TIMER SYSTEMS TO PREVENT THE USE OF THE SYSTEM DURING TIMES OF WATER RESTRICTIONS AS ESTABLISHED BY ORDINANCE OR BY THE BURGESS AND COMMISSIONERS PURSUANT TO TITLE 13 OF THIS CODE. B. INSTALLER SHALL PROVIDE EVIDENCE OF TRAINING OR CERTIFICATION FOR THE DESIGN AND INSTALLATION OF IRRIGATION SYSTEMS.
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higgledy wrote:

Not one of the specifications for the controller seem out of line to me, at least if the government has an interest in conserving a resource which might be scarce such as water. The need for a permit seems as reasonable as any such requirements ever does and perhaps even more so with a modification that attaches to the public water supply and which, if installed improperly, can contaminate that supply. The only thing which might be out of line is the $200 fee and that would probably depend on what the general permit fees are for other construction. If all other permits cost $10 then $200 is outrageous but if the average fee is $200 then this particular one is fine.
I can see one circumstance which wasn't mentioned and which may make a major difference: if the irrigation is being done with water from a well on the owner's property or which is gathered from rainfall on that property then permitting is probably excessive.
There is a cost beyond the obvious when one decides to live in a built-up area -- you are at the mercy of your neighbors and if the neighbors decided that tight governmental controls are good then you are virtually powerless to stop them.
--
John McGaw
[Knoxville, TN, USA]
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John McGaw wrote:

This why I get so pissed. The town approved 2 huge develpoments that doubled the town's population in only five years. We went from less than 2200 residents to over 4000 since 2000! Now, we are having water problems, thanks for all the planning. My town WAS a decent place to live.
Oh, the greatest irony is the ordiance effects in-ground irrigation not above ground.
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that section informs the local government of the additonal drain on the water source and supply systems; about property improvements; and should be notice that an inspection of the connection to the community water supply is required. You pay for the paperwork, and for the plumbing inspector to check that you don't contaminate the water supply of your neighbors.

you don't say if it is required or instead it says that if you have one, this is what it must have

that makes no sense, because sometimes sprinkling during rain is the most efficient (light rain, intermittent showers, etc. - around here, to get an inch of water a week on the lawn) . Sounds like this section was put in by someone who thought on face value that it was a good idea - inputs?

this one makes sense - and if you have this one, IMHO you can scrap the rain sensor clause as a gimmick, unless you live in an area where rain only comes in one inch or greater downfalls. When it rains and the water fills the soil, this one should turn off a sprinkler, on the remote chance it was running in the rain, when it has rained enough to have the soil watered- better than a rain sensor around here.

this one also makes sense if your area is water limited (western states, etc.). It limits water loss from the communty water source.

this one is iffy - plans with a permit showing breakers, underground line and pipes, etc., and city inspection of the critical elements is mandatory, IMHO. The potable water supply is at risk, and some 18 yr old with a half day training is not who I want checking for vacuum breakers and other isolation.
But it doesn't take rocket science to put in a sprinkler system. Just knowledge of the buried stuff, a line puller, basic electrical safety, and basic plumbing safe practice.
fwiw
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higgledy wrote:

Any connection to our local water system requires a permit from the County's Department of Building and Safety. Getting a permit notifies the County that the connection is being made so that an inspection can confirm that the connection does not compromise the safety of the system and the water in it. After all, we drink that water.
"Evidence of training" is waived in my County if the person doing the work is the property owner. Otherwise, a licensed plumbing contractor must do the work. This again is for the safety of both the property owner and all others drinking from the water system.
Permits and licensed contractors are required to replace a hotwater heater. In that case, the issue is not only the integrity of the water system; it's also the safety of the gas connection. I'm sure similar regulations apply to anyone making modifications to their home's electrical wiring. We have such regulations here.
Given the fact that, here in California, the state's supply of fresh water is almost fully committed, requirements for water-conserving irrigation systems are very reasonable. These requirements are now being applied not only to home gardens but also to agriculture.
In my County, farmers have fought local cities over riparian rights to the runoff from sewage plants. In my community, parks and schools are irrigated with reclaimed water from our local sewage plant. To conserve water and prevent intrusion of seawater into aquifers, the County even regulates the operation of wells.
Laws like these are required simply because -- without them -- people will not do the right thing.
--

David E. Ross
<http://www.rossde.com/
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Glad I don't live there.
--
The Lone Sidewalk Astronomer of Rosamond

Telescope Buyers FAQ
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If it was run by commies, your neighbors would be paying the permit costs.
higgledy wrote:

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I think the permit should be several thousand dollars. Why should the rest if us defray the cost of some idiot using potable water that has been treated tested monitored and piped just so they can water turfgrass? higgledy wrote:

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I'm trying to e-mail you a case of your favorite beer, as a reward for your comments. Go chill some mugs.

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Often enough to be nauseating, I see sprinkler systems running on bright sunny days when it's windy. In terms of using the water most effectively, that's the worst possible time to do it. Anyone with a brain knows that. It's been common knowledge since I first heard it, around 1968.
What can we conclude from this? Simple: Too many owners of sprinkler systems are morons. It's good to make their lives difficult.
Oh, and if you read a few news sources written for grownups, you'll notice that water is not an infinite resource.
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JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

Yeah, our city would not let my club put in drip or underground irrgation, even though on some days 'sprinkling' can mean losing a huge percentage to wind/evaporation. Oh, and usually any restrictions do not apply to government property.
Carl
--
to reply, change ( .not) to ( .net)

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Of course not. The guvmint has to pay someone to watch the water drip, so if no water drips, then someone's family member won't have a job.
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JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

Among natural resources, water would seem to be as close to an infinite resource as any, and closer than most.

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What kind of water did you have in mind?
The polluted water available to Third World refugees who sicken and die from cholera and other water-borne diseases?
Or the pump water that must be carried long distances by Third World women and children?
Or the expensive water furnished to Third World residents by Monsanto, e.g. which has bought up the "rights" via international maneuvering, taking away the locals' rights to access their own water?
Or the desalinated water available to thirsty countries at great expense (because the technology is not subsidized so it can be perfected and prices can come down?
Or did you have in mind the water wasted in luxurious First World Countries by badly programmed lawn sprinklers; by leaky municipal pipe systems; by simple carlessness like letting the water run while brushing teeth; by growing thirsty crops like cotton e.g. in arid areas like California's Central Valley, where agribusiness through political pull gets water prices meant for small farmers?
Persephone
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Persephone wrote:

That's the great thing about water; any of those would work because it's a closed system. (although it would be kind of heartless to take the "the pump water that must be carried long distances by Third World women and children" away and water a lawn with it.)
Best regards, Bob
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Perhaps you should change your online alias to "light on nobody home". Then, start reading and listening to news sources aimed at people over 12.
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JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

While there are many locations that have yet to achive a safe water supply for their citizens, it often is due more to a poor political structure than any difficulty with the technology. Water is fairly easy to move and to purify (at least to make potable) and, if it were otherwise, the price/availability would certainly reflect its value. In terms of the vast majority of people reading this newsgroup, water will likely remain both good and cheap for their lifetime.
Carl
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to reply, change ( .not) to ( .net)

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That takes care of those who read this newsgroup. But, water is still not an infinite resource, unless you subtract many factors which affect its availability. Human activity is the largest factor.
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My town's new in-ground irrigation ORDINANCE:
THE PERMIT FEE SHALL BE TWO HUNDRED DOLLARS ($200.00). ADDITIONALLY THE APPLICANT SHALL OBTAIN A PLUMBING PERMIT FROM FREDERICK COUNTY.
They even specify the controller:
SUCH TECHNOLOGICAL DEVICES, SOMETIMES REFERRED TO AS "SMART CONTROLLERS", SHALL INCLUDE: (A) RAIN SENSORS WHICH PREVENT THE USE OF THE SYSTEMS DURING RAIN OR OTHER PRECIPITATION EVENTS. (B) GROUND SENSORS WHICH MEASURE THE MOISTURE IN THE SOIL TO AVOID UNNECESSARY USE OF THE SYSTEM WHEN THE GROUND MOISTURE IS HIGH; AND A. PROGRAMMABLE TIMER SYSTEMS TO PREVENT THE USE OF THE SYSTEM DURING TIMES OF WATER RESTRICTIONS AS ESTABLISHED BY ORDINANCE OR BY THE BURGESS AND COMMISSIONERS PURSUANT TO TITLE 13 OF THIS CODE. B. INSTALLER SHALL PROVIDE EVIDENCE OF TRAINING OR CERTIFICATION FOR THE DESIGN AND INSTALLATION OF IRRIGATION SYSTEMS.
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Clearly the town is run by capitalists -- they want your money!
My town's new in-ground irrigation ORDINANCE:
THE PERMIT FEE SHALL BE TWO HUNDRED DOLLARS ($200.00). ADDITIONALLY THE APPLICANT SHALL OBTAIN A PLUMBING PERMIT FROM FREDERICK COUNTY.
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