Mushrooms on plum tree

My mum has an old plum tree in her garden, probably 20 years or more old. It has always produced loads of fruit until a so-called tree surgeon hacked it back early this year. It's been pretty grim looking since then. Today she noticed the trunk and branches are covered in mushrooms. ( Pic is below. ) It has been several days since she was near the tree so she's not sure how long they have been there.
I've been googling but the only similar thing I found was mushrooms growing round the base of the trunk, not all over. Will this tree have to be cut down ? Or is there something to treat it with ? Mums also worried it will spread to her other fruit trees.
I would greatly appreciate some help on this !
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deb13b


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On 12/31/2011 02:21 PM, deb13b wrote:

You could mix up a solution of dish soap and water, then spray it on the tree and gently scrub with a soft brush.
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On 12/31/11 12:21 PM, deb13b wrote:

Plum trees should be pruned heavily every year, not as severely as peaches but heavily nonetheless. Also, stone fruits are generally not long-lived.
However, I would strongly urge you to have a different tree expert examine the tree.
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wrote:

It looks like a form of the Ganoderma. AKA: shelf fungi, but don't trust an out of focus internet guess, do verify. Many of the Fungi folks and Myco Associations will be happy to assist. Most likely one in your area that would be familiar with these. Recommend you get a better pic, also put something of a know scale... a coin, a ruler etc., in the pic for reference and shoot the underside also. take a step back with your camera or use another that will allow a micro view--- your too close for your lens.
If correct, It does produce a white rot condition and is one of natures's best decomposters, so most likely it is the beginning of the end of the tree. there are no cultural or chemical controls for preventing or for curing the the pathogen. But it can go on for years.
Life Cycle of Ganoderma Fungi "Different Ganoderma species have different behavioral habits. Some feed harmlessly on dead matter, while others classified as "wound pathogens" invade and kill the sapwood of living trees. Ganoderma fungi reproduce by airborne spores. They can also spread from infected roots to healthy ones during the process of root grafting. Upon infecting main or lateral roots, Ganoderma species develop a mycelium, which builds into a whitish mat under the bark. This mat later turns brown. The mycelium then moves up the crown roots to the trunk to develop the ribbon-like structures called "rhizomorphs." From the rhizomorphs finally come the characteristic semicircular "conks" or fan-shaped brackets at or near the base of the tree. These are the fruiting bodies, which release millions of spores over the next five to six months."
Read more: Treatment For Ganoderma Root Rot | Garden Guides http://www.gardenguides.com/106945-treatment-ganoderma-root-rot.html#ixzz1iK6zyJOM
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On 1/2/2012 12:36 PM, Gunner wrote:

http://www.gardenguides.com/106945-treatment-ganoderma-root-rot.html#ixzz1iK6zyJOM -----------------
Liked your response.... However I myself do not think it is Ganoderma. Dammit I used to know what victimizes the Prunus trees, but for the life of me.... OK nevermind.
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Nelly W;946607 Wrote: > On 1/2/2012 12:36 PM, Gunner wrote:-

> near

> (http://tinyurl.com/75g5vj5 )-

you are smart , be careful !
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deb13b;946147 Wrote: > My mum has an old plum tree in her garden, probably 20 years or more > old. It has always produced loads of fruit until a so-called tree > surgeon hacked it back early this year. It's been pretty grim looking > since then. Today she noticed the trunk and branches are covered in > mushrooms. ( Pic is below. ) It has been several days since she was near > the tree so she's not sure how long they have been there.

> growing round the base of the trunk, not all over. Will this tree have > to be cut down ? Or is there something to treat it with ? Mums also > worried it will spread to her other fruit trees. As previously said, this is a very common rot fungus, it is feeding on dead wood. You'll have to look at the tree to decide whether the rot is localised or widespread, if the former you may be able to cut it out. By the time it gets to fruiting like this it has been feasting on dead wood for a while, so I would doubt that this is caused by the action of the pruning earlier in the same year, the tree must have already been compromised. The tree surgeon should have noticed this, though he probably preferred to be paid for doing what he had been asked to do rather than tell you that the tree was on its way out and would perhaps be better be removed entirely. Some trees, of course, are happy to rot out their centre and carry on living as a hollow shell, including some fruit trees, though that tends to be trees with a large trunk, and productivity will be compromised.
I would say it is unlikely to be a threat to other healthy trees in your garden: it is extremely common, you'll find it everywhere in your local woods, so the spores of this fungus are everywhere all the time, so having a local source of spores is unlikely to change the risk level much.
Personally I'd plant another tree now as it is bare-root fruit-tree planting season, just in case the other can't be saved. You mustn't plant a replacement in precisely the same location anyway, so you'll have to find a new location for the replacement whatever happens.
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