mushrooms in planter boxes and pots

Hello,
I'm seeing fair numbers of mushrooms crop up in my flower boxes and ceramic pots. Small heads on very thin stalks. Other than getting all over the plants they don't seem to be doing any harm.
The soil is a generic potting mix that i added about 33% perlite and a smattering of organic fertilizer to.
Should I be concerned about this? I thought that they may indicate over watering but the soil is just moist, not soggy and it's all well drained.
Is there some way to prevent this from happening?
thanks ml
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Some companies use mushroom compost in their potting soil and compost products. Often the spores survive and this could be what is popping up. The potting mix I use does this on occasion, no harm no foul. A surge of warm weather brings on a crop of little mushrooms in new potting soil. I just scrape the little mushrooms off, fluff the soil and ignore it. Because it's happening in all your boxes and pots and you don't seem to be doing anything wrong I wouldn't worry about it. There really isn't anyway to prevent the 'shrooms at first but if you remove them when you see them they will stop appearing and not show up next year. YMMV but this has been my experience, otherwise it doesn't hurt a thing. I wouldn't try eating them just to be on the cautious side. If you still have your bag of soil see if it mentions mushroom compost in the contents.
Val

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If it's not fuzzy looking stuff growing on your plants, don't sweat it. fungi are saprophytes, turning the organic material in your potting soil into food for your plants.
Food for autotrophs, YES. Define ---> definition --> food --> noun any nutritious substance that people or animals eat or drink, or that "PLANTS" absorb, in order to maintain life and growth.
Sorry about that. We have a compulsive poster that plants can't eat FOOD. Probably something about table etiquette.
Anyway, your plants are now enjoying a symbiotic relationship and are being cared for by their new little friends.
--

Billy

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9KVTfcAyYGg&ref=patrick.net

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wrote:

Maybe you should feed the tree real good and put it in a closet. I see you are fighting to claim the person that wrote that definition understood trees. Again you show your ignorance of photosynthesis. Food is a substance that provides and energy source, mostly. Nutrient is a substance that provides an energy source, elements, and other substances essential for life, in types and amounts that can provide a healthy life. Fertilizer is a substance that provides elements, as salts mostly, or in bonded forms, that require microorganisms to alter to forms that can be absorbed by plants. Trees do not get food from the soil. They manufacture their own food. Why lie to people and mislead them? You get your joys that way? Trees cannot absorb a nutrient or food. They do absorb essential elements. There are 17 essential elements - 14 From The Soil. Carbon, Hydrogen, Oxygen, Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Potassium, Calcium, Sulfur, Magnesium, Manganese, Iron, Copper, Boron, Molybdenum, Chlorine, Zinc, Nickel [Sodium, Cobalt, Selinium?]. They are elements. Elements are single atoms or groups of atoms of similar type. They are not food or are they nutrients. A list of elements can be found here: http://www.webelements.com /
I suggest these articles for a better understanding of tree chemistry. http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/shigo/CHEM.html
http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/shigo/RHIZO.html
The person that wrote those and the definitions I use understood trees more than most people. Especially Webster who wrote a dictionary.
--
Sincerely,
John A. Keslick, Jr.
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