mums

anyone have any luck starting mums from cuttings or other mums
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I'm not sure this is a good idea. What if all the cuttings took and you ended up with scores of mums? You'd never be off the phone and your children would be spoiled rotten.
Janet
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contains these words:

Uh huh! It could be even worse if they were all mums-in law! :)
John
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Mums are relatively easy to start by either method, but division is easier. If you insist on cutting, do it in the spring when the new growth is 3" to 4" tall. Cut off the new growth at the base and trim off the bottom leaves so that about 2" on the bottom are bare of leaves. Plant these cuttings in a container that contains a medium such as ProMix. Water and cover the container with a clear plastic, making sure the plastic is not in contact with the leaves. Provide bottom heat (heat mat) to hasten rooting, and place the covered container with cutting in bright light. They should root with 3 to four weeks at which point you can plant into pots.
The easier method is to dig up the plants in the spring from the area where they wintered when they are 2" to 3" tall and shake off the dirt. With a sharp knife (I've even resorted to a hatchet.) cut the plant apart, making sure each part contains a growing section with roots. Plant the piece into the ground or a pot and water in well. You should have about 95% survival if you keep them watered.
John
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