Moving an apple tree...

We've just purchased a new cantilever glass veranda for our garden patio. At the moment there is a 5 year old apple tree in the space, about 15ft tall.
We're wondering if we can dig it up and relocate it? Have absolutely no idea how to do this or how to care fore the tree once it's been moved (about 30ft). any guidance or suggestions would be welcome.
--
RachaelDavidson


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On Jun 10, 5:52 am, RachaelDavidson <RachaelDavidson.

Is this a do-it-yourself project? There are contractors who specialize in moving trees and have a specialized piece of equipment (called a tree spade, at least in the U.S.) for doing so - see, e.g., http://www.ccicrane.com/tree.html . Alternatively, with a tree this size you could probably have a good landscaping service move it by hand. Or you could move it yourself.
The key is to get as big of a root ball with it as possible. In other words, as much dirt as possible coming with it. For a tree this size, maybe a three-foot diameter ball, which is going to be (a) a lot of work to dig out, and (b) really heavy to lift and carry. First dig the hole where the tree will go, then dig out the tree and put it in the hole. Do not lift the tree by the trunk; lift the root ball from underneath, using shovels as levers. If your soil is very sandy or crumbly you may need to wrap up the root ball with fabric to help keep it intact (e.g., an old sheet). Afterwards, no special care except lots of water to help it get through the shock.
To get an idea of what you'll be dealing with, go to a tree nursery or garden store and look at the trees they have for sale there. They may have trees almost the same size for sale, pre-dug, so you can see how big a container they are in and check out what would be involved in moving it. -- H
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On Fri, 10 Jun 2011 11:46:33 -0700 (PDT), Heathcliff

It's very difficult for me to believe that a five year old apple tree is about 15 feet tall. A five year old apple tree is maybe 1' caliper and can't be more than 6' tall, and has a root ball that will easily fit a five gallon pail. If truly five years old I'd dig it up with a garden spade (pruning it's roots will help it acclimate to a move), should take like ten minutes and move it to its new previously prepared home... trim off about 1/3 if its top growth, water well, and it should be fine. A fifteen foot tall apple tree would be more like fifteen years old and 2 1/2" caliper. I can't think of any five year old tree that can attain a 15' height.
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Yes you can dig it up and move it but do so in winter not whilst its in active growth. You need to get as big a root ball as you can when you dig around and under it - don't try this if you don't have adequate garden tools - get a specialits or jsut cut it off and plant a new one in the new spot. If you do try to move it yourselves have a heap of strong young male friends on hand to help you to get plastic/hessian under the rootball and then drag it on the plastic/hessian to its new hole and replant at the same soil level as in its original position.
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"FarmI" wrote:

Not true... you're obviously no kind of farmer... even city kids know that apple trees grow where the ground freezes in winter. The best time to move apple trees is in early spring after the ground has thawed but before the tree's buds open... or in fall after the leaves drop but before the ground freezes (obviously). But moving apple trees in spring is best... the tree will have several months for its roots to become established before the ground freezes... fall planting of apple trees is iffy, the tree will suffer a much longer period of shock. If the tree hasn't already been moved I'd wait until spring.
http://landscaping.about.com/cs/shrubsbushes/ht/transplanting.htm
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Brooklyn1 wrote:

Apples grow in many places (and do well) where the ground doesn't freeze. For example in Tasmania they harvest around 50,000 tons per year. I wonder if you are simply showing your rather parochial viewpoint or do you know this and have decided to try to start an argument anyway.
Rachael, don't move it when it is actively growing, this would be after the leaves fall and before bud burst and, yes, digging may be difficult in frozen ground if that applies to you.
D
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"Brooklyn1" <Gravesend1> wrote in message

LOL. We grow superb apples and our ground NEVER freezes in winter.
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FarmI;926473 Wrote:

Nice informative post. It's really helpful and useful. Thanks.
--
jackzayum

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