Moving a Crepe Myrtle

Hi ... I just moved into a townhouse and the previous owners planted a crepe myrtle right next to the front door. I want to move it before it gets too big and too old (the townhouse itself is only 2 1/2 years old so the plant can't me very old). I'm in the Washington DC area so can anyone tell me the best time to transplant it? Is now okay? Should I wait until the spring?
Any advice is greatly appreciated.
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I've had good success moving rather small plants (<8') in early to mid spring. They get an extensive but relatively shallow root system. Be ready to amke clean cuts through 1-2" diameter roots digging 2' out from the trunk in all directions. You may also have to cut some that go straight down. Try to undercut 6-8" down and slide the whole root mass onto burlap or cardboard to slide to the new location.Cut the top by half and replant in the new place at the same depth it was growing originally. Water well, mulch and stake against high winds if fairly tall and especially if already leafed out. Sandy soil is a lot easier than clay to deal with. Good luck. Gary

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CM's are notoriously late to leaf out in our area... anytime in early spring will be fine.
Dave

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On Sat, 25 Oct 2003 01:29:57 GMT, "David J Bockman"

Imagine the circle that represents teh edge of your futurte root ball. divide it into sections (4, or 6, or 8). Use a sharp spade to cut throught the edge of every other section (i.e., cut half the roots). When you dig it up later, you'll have a head start toward transplant recovery.
Though crapes are actually pretty good at recovering anyway, this should help a bit to let teh plant adjust to teh move.
Keith For more info about the International Society of Arboriculture, please visit http://www.isa-arbor.com/home.asp . For consumer info about tree care, visit http://www.treesaregood.com /
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Thank for all the good info. Now, at least, I have a plan.

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This past April i did just that, a hardy crepe myrtle that was 12 feet high. I cut the entire shrub almost down to the ground, dug up its large roots, and replanted it. It recovered very easily and bloom for me this late July and I live north of washington...nyc. And to my suprise, the move had given me 7 more c.m. where somehow some roots must of been left there. Wonderful color now in the fall. So i would wait around april. good luck
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that's what crepe myrtles do best wishy,
once planted and established they are one plant that generally should be left alone as you can get heaps of volunteer growth from the damaged and left behind roots, just like having a weed in the lawn then.
but then that's just been my experience with them from days of mowing lawns and seeing what these plants do. they are a very nice tree especially when in flower but plant them in the right place first time. and best not to disturb the roots of a living tree anytime.
my suggestion for js148 is poison that tree and buy and plant a new one.
len
snipped
--
happy gardening
'it works for me it could work for you,'
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