Morning LGory

Why do I have so much plant and not so many flowers?
MJ
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In article

Could it be lack of phosphorus ?
http://www.ehow.com/list_7418952_phosphate-blooming-trees.html
--
Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden

"The best fertilizer is the gardener's shadow." - Anon
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I don't think so. I used a 10 10 10 fertilizer mix
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wrote:

If just planted in the ground it needs to become established before it will flower normally, could be another year or two... and if potted it will never flower well.
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"mj" wrote in message wrote:

I don't think so. I used a 10 10 10 fertilizer mix ====================== When you fertilize MG you will usually get growth at the expense of flowers.
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(delimiter removed)
"Nelly" wrote in message wrote:

I don't think so. I used a 10 10 10 fertilizer mix ====================== When you fertilize MG you will usually get growth at the expense of flowers.
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On 6/21/11 7:40 AM, mj wrote:

You gave it 10% nitrogen, 10% phosphorus, and 10% potassium. I don't really know your soil, so I will have to guess.
Nitrogen often promotes leaves and stems at the expense of flowers. It should be used only once, at the beginning of the growing season. If there is still some growing season remaining, a light dose might be applied again after all flowering is done.
My soil usually has sufficient potassium without adding any fertilizer.
Phosphorus promotes flowers, but it does not disolve. It must be placed in the planting hole before the plant goes into the ground. That way, the roots will find the phosphorus. Putting 10-10-10 fertilizer on the surface of the soil merely wastes the phosphorus.
My suggestion is to buy a bag of bone meal or superphospate and a 3-foot length of 1/2-inch steel rebar. Poke the rebar into the ground as deep as it will go about a foot away from the plant and wiggle the rebar to increase the size of the hole. Fill the hole with bone meal or superphospate. Repeat, making a circle of 3-4 holes around each plant. For older and larger plants, you might need a circle of 4-6 holes about 2 feet from each plant.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
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Wow, thank you that was very helpful
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mj wrote:

Morning glory grows best in full sun on a rusty old fence in lousy soil in vacant lots where no one gives them a fig of care... my suggestion is to leave it TF alone before yoose kill it with a barrel of toxic chemicals and a mountain of stupidity. And if yoose gotta water it best is first thing in the morning to let loose when your bladder is about to burst... why do you think it's called morning glory...
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