More Thoughts on Invasive Weed Grass (which is now identified)

OK. Pat K has identified my lawn invasion as Nimblewill: http://www.msuturfweeds.net/details/_/nimblewill_44 /
I can pull a lot of it out by hand, given we get a few cooler days here in the Chicago suburbs, but I cannot get all of it out. I was thinking of spraying Roundup on the areas where it is 100% invasive to see if that kills it off. If that works, I was then thinking of moistening a rag dripping wet with Roundup, me wearing waterproof gloves, and rubbing the rag on the weedgrass while avoiding the real grass as much as possible. I know spraying will hit everything, weed and grass alike, so that is not an option where there is still regular grass mixed in. If I just get the Roundup on the weedgrass, will it transfer via the roots to the lawngrass?
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hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

will help a great deal, let it grow as long as possible before spraying to maximize leaf/stem surface area, trim on highest setting just before spraying (really helps a lot). that is as long as it doesn't go to seed. :)

or a sponge paintbrush in the appropriate size. think of it as therapy on a nice day, to go out and sit in the lawn and listen to the birds chirp, the neighbors argue, if you hear a loud noise like a divebomber it is probably a hummingbird thinking your ear is a flower. do not paint your ears red, they tickle like you wouldn't believe and can be a menace to your ear drums. ok, that was a bit of a joke as they are rather feisty this time of year jousting in the bee balm...

yea, you can also trim off as much as possible and track down runners through the grass and pull them too. but much easier to apply roundup with the sponge brush and let the chemical find all the runners for you and take them out without disturbing the rest of your soil.
you might have to go back a few times, but this is the most economical way to use roundup since you are using only a small amount and only hitting the weeds you want to take out. residual damage to other plants and soil is minimal and the therapy is good. :)
you might have to hit an area a few times to get everything, but that can also be from residual seeds sprouting when conditions are right.

no, you're safe there as long as you keep it on the weed. might take a while to notice what you've missed as this time of year some things are going dormant.
songbird
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Thanx for the reply, I will make a low stool to sit on, with a hole for a beverage container, and make sure not to paint it to avoid attracting wildlife, both flying and on the ground<G>.
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Painting on herbicide sounds like just as much work as digging it up. At least with digging up, you also loosen the soil, which is good for the grass left behind. And you can drink a cold beer or a hot coffee while you do it. Beverages and herbicides don't mix.
The best time to dig up weeds is a few hours after a good soaking rain.
    Una
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hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote: ...

i sit as close to ground level as possible on a chair bottom that has plenty of padding and then i often find myself stretching out and shifting positions as my back and butt desire. it's amazing what you can observe at a few inches elevation, but that does put a damper on productivity.
yes, you can dig them up and track down the stolons/runners/roots, but that stirring of the soil also moves seeds around and up from below. nature does enough of that via worms, ants and other critters so it doesn't need any help from me. the less i disturb the soil in any planting the fewer weeds come up there as they don't get stirred up and it doesn't leave as many places for the weed seeds blowing by to get going too. the dead stuff standing offers some protection to new seedlings if you plant it again immediately, but alas, there will probably be remaining plants to deal with for a bit before you'll have it completely under control.
yeah, it's a lot of work to paint, but for the situation mentioned where he's talking about taking out the middle with a full spray then he's just having to deal with the stragglers around the edges and isolated spots that are too small to spray.
here, spray is always the last resort, i weed as much by hand as possible and plant cover crops to provide shade and nursury plants for whatever else i want to plant to follow on for the subsequent years. many of these efforts are later sidetracked and remodeled (because of wanting to improve drainage or a new garden or a new burying spot for deadheading or the last raccoon found in the road upwind, etc.)
good luck, :)
songbird
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On Wed, 7 Jul 2010 19:17:47 -0700 (PDT), "hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net"

I wouldn't use Round Up, you'll end up with lots of big bare spots where nothing will grow for a good long while (probably even kill some distant plants with overspray/wind), and then the first plants to return will be, WEEDS! Instead get with a weed n' feed program... it will eradicate most broadleaf grasses/weeds. Water and mow properly. There is no way to have a relatively weed free lawn without chemicals, just not possible. I can hear how you're looking for the lazy/cheap way out, uh uh... lawns require constant work and cash... owning a lawn is like owning a boat.

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