Monsanto meltdown

MONSANTO MELTDOWN - ROUNDUP RESISTANT WEEDS THREATEN MAJOR CASH IMPACT ON LAND VALUES IN US
The US is being hit by Roundup Ready resistant weeds and an independent market research study, which has been discreetly circulating and has been seen by GM WATCH, says Roundup Ready resistance is set to hit the economic value of farmland wiping around 17% off US land rentals. What's more, 46% of the farm managers surveyed in the study said weed resistance to glyphosate, the active ingredient in Monsanto's herbicide Roundup, is now their top weed-resistance concern.
The report warns, "Suddenly, glyphosate-resistant weeds have become more than an in-season production and profitability issue. They can also affect the long-term value of farmland". It also says, "These survey findings should make both farm managers and landowners take notice" because "The economic consequences are significant" and can represent for landowners "a major loss of cash flow".
Glyphosate is being massively used in North America thanks to Monsanto's GM herbicide-resistant 'Roundup Ready' crops. But there is growing concern among weed scientists and land owners about the emergence of glyphosate-resistance. As the report notes, "The high volume of glyphosate being used across the country as a result of RR technology adoption makes this a very real concern for growers, professional farm managers and the owners of farmland."
Glyphosate-resistant marestail has already been found in Delaware, Tennessee, Kentucky, Indiana and Ohio. Marestail (horseweed) is a prolific seed producer and the seeds are easily blown around by the wind so this is a major problem. But the problem doesn't stop there. Glyphosate-resistant rigid ryegrass has been reported in California. Weed scientists in Iowa and Missouri are already testing waterhemp from fields that seem to be showing more tolerance to glyphosate. There are also complaints about marginal control of velvetleaf, ivyleaf morningglory and lambsquarters control with glyphosate.
The latest bad news for Monsanto, which has always promoted Roundup as a way of simplifying farm management issues, comes courtesy of its main rival, the world's largest biotech company, Syngenta, which commissioned the market research study report and has been quietly circulating it to farmers and landowners via its PR company, Gibbs & Soell.
Syngenta hopes to profit from the wave of concern over Roundup resistance as people rush to use extra chemicals, and crop rotations not involving RR crops, to try and head off the build up of glyphosate resistance on their land.
But American famers using Roundup Ready crops could be headed up a cul-de-sac.
According to weed scientists, such as Iowa State University's Mike Owen, it's doubtful whether this kind of resistance management will be viewed as economically feasable at elast in the short term. As Owen told a packed-out meeting of North Central Weed Science Society in St. Louis recently, he expects growers to try and carry on using glyphosate in the same way to try and avoid the extra expense of other chemicals until they are finally forced by resistance to switch to something else. But an article reporting on the Weed Science Society meeting concludes, "With few, if any, new blockbuster chemicals in the pipeline, the question may become whether there will be alternative programs to switch to if glyphosate loses its effectiveness." [see "Glyphosate resistance dominates weed science meetings", Mike Holmberg, Farm Chemicals Editor, Successful Farming December 6, 2002, http://www.biotech-info.net/dominating.html ]
Among the CONCLUSIONS in the Syngenta report:
*Specific weed resistance can reduce a farm,s rentable value by 17 percent
*The greatest weed-resistance concern is glyphosate tolerance in RR crops
*More than half of farm managers placed it ahead of their concerns about weed resistance to atrazine, Pursuit, ALS herbicides or propanil
*Almost two-thirds (63 percent) of these professional farm managers expect the importance of glyphosate tolerance to increase in the future when determining rental values and land appraisals. "Given the increasing adoption of RR technology in corn,soybeans and cotton,these professional farm managers and rural appraisers felt the importance of glyphosate-resistant weeds will increase in the future.Overall, 63 percent said it will become a bigger problem."
*Almost half (47 percent)now require practices to manage weed resistance... This is expected to grow to 54 percent in the future
*Seventy percent said the use of weed resistance-management practices already influence their tenant selection.
The report also looks at western Australia, where weed resistance to herbicides is becoming a big problem for land productivity.
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Monsanto's "Shock and Awe" DEVINDER SHARMA / AgBioIndia Bulletin 17apr03 The American biotech giant, Monsanto, seems to have picked up a leaf from the empty book of George Bush Jr. -- if you are not with us in pushing the risky genetically engineered seeds, than you are against us. So goes the new refrain.
True to the mantra, it demonstrated its "shock and awe" fire power when a bus load of farmers brought from Andhra Pradesh disembarked in New Delhi to 'disrupt' a meeting organised by the New Delhi-based NGO Gene Campaign, on Tuesday, April 15. Gene campaign was merely presenting the data of a field study on the performance of Bt cotton crop in Andhra Pradesh.
The sad incident happened in the presence of a former Finance Minister of India, Dr Manmohan Singh, who too pleaded with Monsanto's hired farmers to let the data of the Bt cotton harvest be presented. These farmers were accompanied by the head of the Liberty Institute, an arch supporter of Mahyco-Monsanto and a promoter of free trade and economic liberalisation.
It wasn't unexpected. We have always warned against the games being enacted in the name of agricultural development and growth. Multinational companies can go to any extent, even use muscle-power to browbeat the country into acceptance of faulty technologies. We bring you the report of the unsavoury incident from the pen of the Gene Campaign's director Dr Suman Sahai, along with the results of the study.
Contents:
1. "Monsanto tried to disrupt our meeting" -- Suman Sahai 2. Field data on India's first Bt cotton harvest -- Gene Campaign
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"Monsanto tried to disrupt our meeting"
Suman Sahai
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For a very recent scientific paper about glyphosate-resistant (GR) cotton see:
http://crop.scijournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/43/3/879
Henry Kuska, retired snipped-for-privacy@neo.rr.com http://home.neo.rr.com/kuska /
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Acrylamide In Cooked Foods The Glyphosate Connection Is Monsanto Poisoning Consumers with Pesticide Residues PROF. JOE CUMMINS / ISIS Report 1aug02 Recent health alert over toxic acrylamide in cooked foods is linked to glyphosate, Prof. Joe Cummins reveals.
Acrylamide is a building block for the polymer, polyacrylamide, a material well-known in molecular biology laboratories as a gel matrix for resolving DNA fragments in sequence analysis and identifying proteins, both under electric fields. In the world at large, polyacrylamide is used in water purification to flocculate suspended organic matter. Recently the world health organization (WHO) had a closed meeting to review the finding that cooked vegetables had significant levels of acrylamide [1]. The finding received worldwide attention because acrylamide is a potent nerve toxin in humans and also affects male reproduction, and causes birth defects and cancer in animals. The WHO press releases implied that the acrylamide finding was a surprise and that the pollutant probably arose from cooking the vegetables.
Strangely, the WHO releases did not mention the fact that polyacrylamide is a well known additive to commercial herbicide mixtures (25% to 30% solutions) to reduce spray drift and to act as a surfactant [2]. The glyphosate (i.e. Roundup) herbicides of Monsanto Corporation are of particular concern because the herbicide interacts with the polymer [2-4]. Experiments showed that heat and light contribute to the release of acrylamide from polyacrylamide, and glyphosate was found to influence the solubility of polyacrylamide, so care was advised in mixing the two.
The evidence seems compelling, therefore, that acrylamide is being released from polyacrylamide in the environment, one of the main sources of which is in glyphosate herbicide formulations. Cooking vegetables that had been exposed to the glyphosate herbicide used with herbicide-tolerant crops, or used during soil preparation for normal crops would result in the releasing more acrylamide. Worse yet, additives such as polyacrylamide are designated 'trade secrets' in North America and information on the contents of herbicide preparations are not available to the public.
I am surprised at WHO's feigned ignorance of the polyacrylamide -herbicide connection. WHO should make more effort to consult experts independent of the giant herbicide corporations for a change, so the public could be told the whole truth.
References
Weiss G. Acrylamide in food: Uncharted territory. Science 2002, 297,27.
Smith E, Prues S and Ochme F. Environmental degradation of polyacrylamides: Effect of artificial environmental conditions. Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety 1996, 35,121-35.
Smith E, Prues S and Ochme F. Environmental degradation of polyacrylamides: II Effects of outdoor exposure. Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety 1997, 37,76-91.
Fischer K, Kotalik J and Kettrup A. Determination of acrylamide monomer in polyacrylamide degradation studies by high performance liquid chromatography. Journal of Chromatographic Science 1999, 37,486-94
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When roundup no longer works maybe one of Monsanto's other inventions will keep the weeds down. I bet their invention PCB would work just fine.
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what good news!!! people been warning against these kind of GMO, now it appears they were entirely on target. Ingrid
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What is marestail? Anyone have a botanical name? If it's equisetum, I don't believe it spreads by seed. Rather, it spreads by underground rhizomes.
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snipped-for-privacy@kahtd.net says... :) What is marestail? Anyone have a botanical name? If it's equisetum, I don't :) believe it spreads by seed. Rather, it spreads by underground rhizomes. :) :) Or known as horseweed Conyza canadensis
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In article <Xns93E5A19A9D5AAmajorursaianemcom@
:) Could it be that Conyza canadensis == Equisetum arvense? :) :) Ursa.. :) :) I came up with HorseWeed is Marestail, Conyza canadensis and HorseTail (Field) is Equisetum arvense. A search of "Conyza canadensis Equisetum arvense" pulled up a few sights you probably can make more of than me ;)
http://www.fraktalwelt.de/lsys/modelle.htm http://home-3.tiscali.nl/~pendersh/plant.htm
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That's correct Lar Horseweed, Conyza canadensis, is sometimes called Marestail. It's in the Asteraceae (Family) Flowering plant. Equisetum, Horsetail, is also sometimes called Marestail when it is in the form of a green, bushy, jointed sterile stem with whorls of thin branches It is in the Equisetaceae (Family) and is closely related to ferns. Equisetum reproduces from rhizomes and from spores.
Also sometimes called Marestail is Hippuris vulgare, Family Hippuricaceae, an aquatic perennial plant, the upper stem having whorls of leaves, a flowering plant.
Again the problem of common names rears its head...........
Emilie NorCal
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Oh, that was a great picture. Sheesh!
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