Monarda didyma (Bee Balm)

Last spring I planted 2 small 1-gallon samples of Monarda didyma (Bee Balm) in a partly sunny area which was behind a retaining wall. The backfill behind the wall was mostly 4 cu. yds. of homemade compost I needed to relocate. This year the plants look more like large shrubs and have completely overgrown the surrounding vegitation.
At this point their flower pedals have mostly dropped. Would shaving these down to about 50% of their current 4' height promote re-growth and re-bloom this year? If not, will it harm next year's growth?
TIA
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (HA HA Budys Here) wrote:

these down

Beebalms definitely rebloom if clipped back between bloomings.
-paghat the ratgirl
--
"Of what are you afraid, my child?" inquired the kindly teacher.
"Oh, sir! The flowers, they are wild," replied the timid creature.
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Balm) in

the
year
down
this
Its probably a good idea to trim it. Monarda often declines after it blooms and powdery mildew sets in, making the plant look ratty.
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On Thu, 15 Jul 2004 14:00:13 +0000, HA HA Budys Here wrote:

Yup!
Nope! I LOVE Bee balm!
Tom
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wrote:

Well I sure wish my Bee Balm would get back to at least 1/2 of what it was prior to h aving a large oak tree uproot and fall on my garden area. The tree did not directly cruch or harm the bee balm to the extnt that it broke it, and it was only on the bee balm no more than 2 or 3 hours tops, as the tree no sooner fell and the wife and I were on it with chainsaws and moving limbs off the flower garden right away. Other than my one crepe myrtle nothing appeared to be broken, but evidently the plants all got shocked, as just abnout over night both my bee balms died back to just about nothing, as well as my hydrangia and ferns. Actually the only thing showing any real life and growth is the busted off crepe myrtle. I cut the broken trunk flush with the ground, and in three weeks time frame since it got broken, it is now pushing out 11 beautiful stems approx 2 to 2 1/2 foot tall already and growing every day. Bee Balm just sets there less than 3 inches tall. Fern never did come back, and the hydrangia are now just starting to put out new leaves.
Just what could that fallen oak tree have done to these plants. It provided them no nutrients or shade, and it was just the top of the oak that hit this garden area, so there really was no soil compaction of any kind. Watering frequency has not changed. Visit my website: http://www.frugalmachinist.com Opinions expressed are those of my wifes, I had no input whatsoever. Remove "nospam" from email addy.
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On Fri, 16 Jul 2004 13:39:58 +0000, Roy wrote:

How long was those Bee balms in the ground? Maybe they are getting crowded? Every few years it's good to thin them out a bit. Give them time...
Tom
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