Micro Tom Tomatos saving seeds

Hi all...
I have a micro tom tomato plant that someone gave me that has produced a load of fruit once and almost died because of some white flys. I got ride of them and now, it's got a second wind and is producing a second batch even more bountiful than the first. My question is simply this... am I able to save the seeds from one of the tomatos on this variety, replant and expect to see some fruit? I'm not real familar with the concepts of how hybrids work and the sterility and such.
Thanks for any help!
Dan
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Dan Charette wrote:

Let's assume they are hybrids. If the fruits have seeds, you can save them and you might get something that closely resembles the parent even if they are hybrids. Plant a bunch and ruthlessly select the best plants. After a few [tomato] generations you'll have a reasonably pure strain of open pollinated tomatoes.
Bob
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Bob...
Thanks for the information. I took two different tomatos that I just picked off the plant and planted seeds from each. With any luck, these won't be too far from the original parent as you said. It is a pretty neat type of tomato as the fruits are about the size of a large gumball. And they do have a rather concentrated tomato flavor.
Thanks!
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On Thu, 27 May 2004 07:40:22 -0500, Dan Charette

It's pretty easy to see by Googling that Micro Tom is a 'heritage' or non-hybrid tomato. You're in luck.
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