May have killed my wild meadow before its started.

I have sown a section of my garden with Wild Meadow seed recently (less than 2 weeks ago) , but today I have spread weed and feed over this area aswell, when I was doing the rest of the lawn.
As soon as I had done it I suddenly thought this may kill the wild meadow seed before it has even started....So my question is have I done the wrong thing using weed and feed over this area..?
Many thanks for any info.
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Jony68


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Jony68.gardenbanana.uk wrote:

Ahahahahahahahahahahahaha. . . . weed killer on newly sown wildflowers... ahahahahahahahahahaha. . . . jony, that's like putting on freshly laundered panties and not wiping your ass. LOL-LOL
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Jony68;954688 Wrote: > I have sown a section of my garden with Wild Meadow seed recently (less > than 2 weeks ago) , but today I have spread weed and feed over this area > aswell, when I was doing the rest of the lawn.

> meadow seed before it has even started....So my question is have I done > the wrong thing using weed and feed over this area..?

Hi Jony, hmmmmm ! but my gut feeling is that you might just have got away with it as most weed and feed rely on there being existing weeds present in grass on which the chemicals act. So assuming that as it had only been sown recently and that its been dry (assuming that your in the UK ??) IF nothing had germinated, you probably are ok but if the seed had germinated, then it might be a different story ?? Also, most weed and feed require that the lawn is at least 6 months old before applying so if even the grass has germinated, you might have damaged that as well !! I think you'll need to see what happens and what grows ??
As a point of interest, having created several 'wild meadows' professionally, if I was to be asked whats the biggest mistake that most people make, its trying to create these in 'normal top-soil', let me explain. If you do try to create these in normal top soil, the grass grows so well that it often smothers the broad leaved flowering element of the mixture and you end up with very little 'flower' so what I found was the most successful way is to remove most of the top soil almost to subsoil level and then sow. The effect of doing this is to 'weaken' the grass element, allowing the flowering element more chance to survive without the grasses crowding them out.
One of the most successful 'wild flower meadows' I ever created was on coastal sand dunes, as planting here gave a lovely balance to the grass v wild flowers, due to the poor nature of the sandy soil.
Hope this helps, Lannerman.
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lannerman


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lannerman;954714 Wrote: > As a point of interest, having created several 'wild meadows' > professionally, if I was to be asked whats the biggest mistake that most > people make, its trying to create these in 'normal top-soil', let me > explain. If you do try to create these in normal top soil, the grass > grows so well that it often smothers the broad leaved flowering element > of the mixture and you end up with very little 'flower' so what I found > was the most successful way is to remove most of the top soil almost to > subsoil level and then sow. The effect of doing this is to 'weaken' the > grass element, allowing the flowering element more chance to survive > without the grasses crowding them out.

> coastal sand dunes, as planting here gave a lovely balance to the grass > v wild flowers, due to the poor nature of the sandy soil.

Many thanks for your input, I think I will just have to wait and see. I also read elsewhere that wild meadows tend to work best on lesser fertile soils.
If it all fails, theres always next year..! Jony68
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Jony68


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wrote:

Depends on how you look at it. Your weed and feed probably has 2.4-D, which will kill most broadleaf plants, so you've just nuked what you sowed. On the other hand, most of the "Wild Meadow"-type seed mixes are loaded with non-native plants that often become real nuisances in some areas. So you've possibly staved off a problem for yourself.
On the other hand, we probably don't need more 2,4-D running around in the soil and getting into mischief.
Kay
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On the other hand, "Gardening is something you learn by doing - and by making mistakes, like cooking, gardening is a constant process of experimentation, repeating the successes and throwing out the failures." - Carol Stocker, American gardening columnist.
--
E Pluribus Unum

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typically weed and feed has a pre-emergent in it that prevents germination of seed. So yes, you probably did the wild meadow seed in. you need to find out what kind of pre-emergent and how long it says it will be before you CAN seed the area. Ingrid
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Somewhere between zone 5 and 6 tucked along the shore of Lake Michigan on the council grounds of the Fox, Mascouten, Potawatomi, and Winnebago
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