Manure as fertilizer ...................

Page 1 of 2  
I live in the middle of pasture land. Lots of free cow patties. My wife seems to think that this would make good fertilizer, or at least good mulch if tilled in.
Other than using fresh dung for the production of food, are there any downsides to using manure? I believe I once read that stall manure had high levels of urea, and would not be good to put on plants. This is pasture manure, so it would not have as high urine level as stall manure.
Yeah, I know I can go buy fertilizer, too. But I can also take the money I save and go fishing a few times.
Tips and caveats on manure use? Good/bad for flowers or areas where I am going to put lawn?
Thanks.
Steve
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I use horse shit every Spring and have great results with my plants.

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
SteveB wrote:

A furphy, urea is good fertiliser.

Why not use it if its free and save the petrochemicals that typically go into synthetic fertiliser.

Cow pats are good for gardens. Cow and horse manure both provide beneficial organic matter and nutrients. There is little in the way of harmful pathogens in them and once dried out or composted briefly they are fairly inoffensive. I would say go for it, there is much to gain and little to lose.
David
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What about pigeon poop?
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Look at chicken info here IΉd hazard a guess it is hot aka rich in N2 which can burn plants. That is why aged and composting is the way to go. 1-1-1 or close to it.
<http://the-compost-gardening-guy.com/article-on-manures.html
<http://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/cropsystems/components/7401_02 .html>
Bill
--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA







Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dan Listermann wrote:

It's excellent but more as a source of nutrients than organic matter. It is quite high in nitrogen, especially when fresh, so it should be mixed in with other material, or added to compost, or risk burning your plants.
David
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've been told that cow manure is full of seed ready to sprout wherever you use it. Horse manure is a better solution.
Chicken manure is okay if you leave it exposed to the weather for one season, and use it where the soil is high on the alkaline side. An easy route to this is use of range chickens (not stuck in a coop all the time). Confine them in an area to range, then move the ranging area to some other location the followiing season.
--
Dave

CDOs are how we got here.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dioclese wrote:

Some of the nutrients in fresh chicken manure are quite volatile and others are very soluble in water. Leaving it out exposed will release these into the environment, which will indeed reduce the chance of burning plants due to excess. However these useful substances will be wasted, unless you want the grass downhill from the heap to be nice and green. A better solution is to mix it in with compost where at least some of the nutrients will be absorbed, or dig it in when preparing a bed and leave it a couple of weeks before planting.
I am not sure why you are saying to use it where the soil is too alkaline. I cannot see that you would be adding enough to alter the pH of soil very much (especially clay-based soil) and I would expect it to raise rather than lower pH.
David
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My parents turned virtually all-caliche soil to something viable for St. Augustine grass that thrived on it by using the rotation method I mentioned. Exposed to weather/sun chicken feces tends to stay put unless there's a downpour from my own observations. The chickens tend to spread the fresher stuff around as well while ranging. (ever get any animal poop between your toes?). Beneath the soil surface, earthworms abound on the stuff and break up the soil. Earthworms don't normally inhabit this type of caliche. The type of caliche they had was the virtually bright while and color, and you could draw on the sidewalk with it. At least that' what we saw. Regardless, I can't argue the results with "science" as the results speak for themselves.
--
Dave

CDOs are how we got here.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dioclese wrote:

I would not dispute the result that you observed - in science evidence always trumps theory. It may be though that the method added organic matter and nutrients which over time improved the texture and growing properties of the soil not a change in pH. But not having worked with caliche that is just a theory :-)
David
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 3 Mar 2009 09:47:33 -0600, "Dioclese" <NONE> wrote:

Just the opposite. Cows have two stomachs, horses have one. I used horse manure (mushroom compost) over fescue lawns--big mistake. The piles were steaming hot, but still introduced a lot of weeds.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Cows actually have one stomach but it has four compartments.
http://media.www.thelantern.com/media/storage/paper333/news/2003/12/02/Campus/A.Window.To.The.World.Of.A.Cows.Stomach-569718.shtml
horses have one. I used

When manure is properly composted it will attain temperatures that kill seeds. Manure should always be fully composted before being used for gardening. Do not use manure from carnivores and omnivores, those need to be processed by specific means (as raw sewage) or they will introduce disease.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Background http://www.ecochem.com/t_manure_fert.html Generally, poultry manure is highest in nitrogen content, followed by hog (an omnivore), steer, sheep, dairy, and horse manure. Feedlot, steer manure requires fairly high rates to meet first-year nitrogen requirements because of its lower nitrogen percent and gradual nitrogen release characteristics.
Worse case scenario, gardening over a leach line. http://www.ext.vt.edu/departments/envirohort/factsheets2/specdesigns/aug9 3pr2.html Do not plant root crops over drain lines. Leafy vegetables could be contaminated by rain splashing soil onto the plant, so either mulch them to eliminate splashing or don't grow them. Fruiting crops should be safe; train any vining ones, such as cucumbers or tomatoes, onto a support so the fruit is off the ground.
Down and dirty. http://www.umext.maine.edu/onlinepubs/htmpubs/2510.htm If you do intend to use raw manure as a soil amendment or fertilizer source on your garden, follow these guidelines: € Apply raw manure at least 120 days before harvesting a crop that has the potential for soil contact (leafy greens, root crops, etc). The USDA National Organic Program (NOP) standards allow a 90-day period between manure application and harvest for crops that donΉt have direct contact potential with soil. € For some gardeners in Maine, the best time to apply raw manure to your garden may be in the fall after harvest; incorporate it into the soil and plant a cover crop to hold nutrients over the winter. This should be done before October 1 for good cover crop establishment. € Never use raw manure as a sidedress to growing plants. Manure that is incorporated and distributed throughout the soil has a much lower risk of passing pathogens to the growing crop. € Consider the source if you still want to use raw manures in your garden. Are the animals in the herd or flock healthy? Is there a parasite problem that requires regular deworming? Does the farm use antibiotics as a regular component of their feeding program?
Ain't Google wonderful?
--

Billy
Democrat and Republican Leaders Behind Bars
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I sit horse crap in a plastic compost bin anywhere from 9 to 18 months & bung on the garden late winter, early spring. It has been well sorted by worms in that time. Works fine for me.
rob
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Good for you and the worms ;O)
--

Billy
There are no lobbyists for cover crops and crop rotation. Why?
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

and if my cider turns out crap, it'll become liquid manure next spring
rob
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ah, hold on there cowboy. There must be some way you can distill it to make apple brandy, like in Normandy ;O)
--

Billy
There are no lobbyists for cover crops and crop rotation. Why?
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

or vinegar
rob
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Uh-huh. Vinegar, though, won't deliver the Dionysian promise of freeing the body from the tyranny of the mind.
The only thing that I use apple vinegar for is "chicken and dumplings".
http://www.moonshine-still.com/page2.htm
--

Billy
There are no lobbyists for cover crops and crop rotation. Why?
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Billy, whats your address. I might yet be shipping a crate or 2 to you.
rob
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.