Magic Tree Stump Dust

I recently removed a maple tree that had grown up between the neighbour's lot and mine. Problem is that the tree has actually grown around the chain link fence. I don't mean that the tree surrounds the fence, I mean that the fence is in the tree. I removed as much as I can of the tree without damaging the fence. But how do I get the rest of the stump out of the fence?
I can't burn it off, as the fence is vinyl coated. The only thing I can think of is to drill as many holes as possible and let nature take it's course.
Any suggestions?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Drill the holes and then get that stuff which causes stumps to rot and stick it in the holes and keep at it, eventually you will prevail! it is a boring job, hard to do in one sitting, and BORING. there is always the last piece which is hung up in the fencing and seems to persist forever! i hate that, i have had to remove long woody ivy from chain link. SOME is still there!
hermine
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
why not just replace that section of chain link. I don't know if you could just buy 2 ft of fence but mosy people that have installed chain link usually have a few feet extra laying around.

the
fence?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<< why not just replace that section of chain link. I don't know if you could just buy 2 ft of fence but mosy people that have installed chain link usually have a few feet extra laying around. >> ____Reply Separator_____ A hell of a lot easier said than done! And since most chain link posts are ten feet apart, how do you propose replacing a two feet section?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks for the replies.
It looks like I'm in for a BORING summer, as Hermine suggested.
If I were to replace a section of Chain Link, I'd likey have to go from post to post. Although a tension bar might allow you to join a short piece. The tree stump is at the end of the fence BTW, so it's only one join, not two.

the
fence?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My situation is even more critical! not to be in a competition for chain link problems...but my chain link is pre-stretched kennel panels, made of fine link, about 1 and 1/4 inches square, custom fabricated in about 1977! and part of a modular setup. High up in the air where a person like me (short) can hardly reach. However, when i dismantle it for relocating it here, it will be up on trestles, and i will gently remove the last of this BURL WOOD, which is hyper hard and has persisted for fifteen years, i am ashamed to admit. At today's prices, replacement is not an option, this is bethanized chain lin, smooth as silk and VERY EXPENSIVE. chain link can be very elegant if the detailing is PERFECT, or it can look like a sagging mess. a whole other story. get out the drills and burs and work on it like fifteen minutes at a time, with a radio or something for diversion.
hermine
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

another thought.... take a hand held belt sander to it.... get as close to the fence as you dare.... then drill/hammer/chisel the rest out...
--
be safe.
flip
Verso l'esterno! Verso l'esterno! Deamons di ignoranza.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I've woven a strand into two ends of the fabric of a regular zinc coated chain link fence and the only place it is even detectable is the top and bottom where the single strand of fence is woven in and not twisted to the mating/adjacent strand. Never worked with vinyl coated, but don't think it would be a problem.
Regards,
Hal

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Keep it moist and keep moistening it with a high nitrogen fertilizer solution. Wood is mostly carbon but if you provide enough nitrogen bacteria will do all the work for you given time.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Three ways I'd do it. 1) Split the stump into four pieces. Take out the pieces with a stump puller or pour rock salt into the splits.
2) Drill dem holes deep. I'd use at least a 1-1/2" bit. And then pour rock salt into the holes.
3) Hire a landscape contractor to pull it.
If you pull it, do not use a car or truck! Very dangerous.
Dick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gee,
If I'm going to drill 1-1/2" holes, might as well use dynamite! :-) Might put a kink in the fence though. You know one of those Chain Kink fences. Worked for my Grandfather's stumps.
On a side note. My grandparents added their basement several years after the house was complete. Of course the house was sitting on the mother of all rocks, pretty common where I grew up. So they had to blast a spot for the furnace under the house.
wrote:

neighbour's
chain
the
fence?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.