Looking for help identifying a tree, and methods to control sap (if possible)

Good day.
I have a tree in the front yard of my recently purchased house, and I was wondering if a kind arborist out there could identify the tree, and if possible tell me if there's any way to control the sap (or to make it less tasty), or alternately when yearly I should expect this sap. I don't mind the sticky residue covering the lane and cars, but the many bees it draws is a bit of a concern.
I've put several pictures at http://www.yafla.com/~dforbes/tree/index.htm .
Thank you for reading. Have a great day.
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It's a Lime, a species of Tilia. There is an American species [1], and Bee-tree is used as a vernacular name for at least one variety of this. However I think this is the European Small-leaved Lime (Littleleaf Linden in American vernacular) Tilia cordata.
The flower bracts of Limes, as shown in the first picture, are unmistakable. In most species the flowers are pendant, but in Tilia cordata, and allied East Asian species, the flowers are borne at all sorts of angles. In Tilia cordata the underside of the leaves usually has a blueish cast. For my details on identification refer to my web page - see sig. The leaves of many poplars are superficially similar to those of limes; however poplars usually have no more than 3 veins meeting at the base of the leaf, and limes have 5 or more. The habit of the trees also differs.
The flowers of lime produce copious nectar, which attracts bees. The sap that you refer to however is honeydew, the excreta of aphids. The sap can occur at any time during the growing season, but tends to be later in the year when aphid populations has built up. Google for Tilia aphid control for possibilities for control. Limes are too big for techniques useable on perennials to work, but if it's not too big, mechanically dislodging the aphids with a water hose might reduce infestations.
[1] At one point many species (30?) of American limes were recognised, but these have been reduced to one, very variable species.
--
Stewart Robert Hinsley
http://www.meden.demon.co.uk/Malvaceae/Tilia/Britain.html
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The tree is a linden (tilia). The "sap" is honeydew from an aphid infestation, something this tree is vulnerable to. It is this honeydew that attracts the wasps. To avoid this next year, you should consult an aborist and have the tree sprayed. It is too large to try doing it yourself. sed5555
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On 07 Sep 2003 21:52:17 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Sed5555) wrote:

attack the aphids.
Keith For more info about the International Society of Arboriculture, please visit http://www.isa-arbor.com/home.asp . For consumer info about tree care, visit http://www.treesaregood.com /
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Unfortunately, lady beetles have not proven effective against this insect, though the lacewings have. sed5555
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On 09 Sep 2003 04:17:28 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Sed5555) wrote:

beetle larvae sucking the juices from aphids. Perhaps you are saying they don't do enough damage to make a significant difference?
At any rate, I would think it's worth a try (along with lacewings, or maybe the lacewings without the lady beetles). My goal was simply to suggest a non-chemical approach (and less expoensive solution than spraying a large tree).
Keith For more info about the International Society of Arboriculture, please visit http://www.isa-arbor.com/home.asp . For consumer info about tree care, visit http://www.treesaregood.com /
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dennis snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Dennis Forbes) wrote in message

I have seen soft bodied scale insects on basswood trees that have rained down honeydew. It doesn't happen every year. In flower you should be able to hear the hum of bees in this tree if there are hives of bees nearby.
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Could it possible be a populus ? I think there is an american populus which looks like tho one on the picture. Isabella.
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dennis snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Dennis Forbes) wrote:

Thank you for posting the answer on your page. I don't know about the tree, but I think you have the insect mis-identified.
Look at the pictures of a Yellow Jacket & a Bald Faced Hornet beside each other at http://www.borealforest.org/insects/insects15.htm
Close-- but the Yellow jacket has Yellow stripes, and they begin his abdomen. Your insect is a Bald Faced Hornet. [still likely there for the same purpose- eating insects] When the leaves drop you'll probably see a large paper nest. Wait until a couple hard frosts & you can bring the empty nest inside as a souvenir.
I went googling for a picture of the nest and found this page; http://www.unexco.com/gallery/hornets.html which says that hornet "is actually a large yellow jacket and not a true hornet". It's been a long time since I studied entymology, so I might stand corrected on that count.
Jim
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The white faced hornet that makes the large paper ball is technically a yellow jacket. Hornets are old world insects.
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snipped-for-privacy@email.com says... :) Close-- but the Yellow jacket has Yellow stripes, and they begin his :) abdomen. Your insect is a Bald Faced Hornet. [still likely there for :) the same purpose- eating insects] :) This time of year their diet will switch from meats to sugars. Nothing worse than taking a swig out of a cola can while outside and realize something has found it's way inside.
--

http://home.comcast.net/~larflu/owl1.jpg

Lar. (to e-mail, get rid of the BUGS!!
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Would much rather have a gin and tonic tree!!!
You can't get key limes from a pad locked linden.

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