Little pieces of stained glass

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Saturday (February 26th) I walked around Faerie Holler and discovered little pieces of stained glass here and there amongst the soft tans, browns and glossy green of the Vinca major. Purple that had a mother of pearl shimmer to it with a dot of yellow at the throat in the random crocus. Stark whites, rich, hot pink peeking out the edge of a black nursery pot from the Species tulip. Deep grape purple's with black spots and white throats and yellow fuzzy mini-beards on Iris reticulata's. Soft and sultry burgundies with kisses of greens and lime's from the Hellebores.
Sky blue with white mingled in like tiny clouds of the blue Iris reticulata's, little bouquets of teeny sulphur yellow flowers on the twig leaf dogwood (Cornus Mas or Cornelian Cherry), rich, buttery yellow's of the early daff's that just couldn't wait and the last two days of low 60's enticed them to spend their energies opening and showing off. I can almost hear their tautes, "we're the first ones!!".
In one pot, a wonderful surprise. The tri-colored Siberian crocus were open. I had forgotten I'd planted them in a cluster, their blue-purple, yellow and white colors weren't enough to make me grin like a lunatic, there was a small honey bee absolutely overjoyed and with fat little pollen pouches working each open blossom. It made my heart swell up with pride that she'd wakened and found my flowers to gather from so early in the season. So intent was she to take every grain of pollen she allowed me to snap a picture of her. (anyone wishing to share in this amazing gift, just holler and I'll JPG it to ya).
The spots of stained glass treasures were scattered about like a spilled box of bright, glistening crystal in delicate shapes. Mostly carved petals of crocus, but the bells of a few Hellebores were chiming a faint toll of eminent spring song. The white freckled faced one underneath the Vitex, who has evident signs of buds forming all along the branches. Tight buds all along seemingly spent stems of every variety of Hydrangea, kissed with plums and rose shades all furled and wrapped tight against the false protection of last years stems.
My Oak Leaf Hydrangea flaking and baring the inner colorations, and seeing that, as the bare stems rose thru the mounded rich soil I had replaced over the emerging crocus that I'd scattered two years ago, that either squirrels or Smagol had disturbed, I walked towards the bare stems of the Diablo nine bark that Grdngal had sent me awhile back. The youth of the shrub was starting to take on the desired appearance of while they're called nine bark. Not quite as majestic as my Oak Leaf's stems, but given the same time, they'll do me proud during Winter's last days one day.
Everywhere I see mocking, shiny green leaves of the Vinca major that if not removed this year will be the undoing of any raised bed or pathway thru them. And I see Euphorbia poking it's little heads up all over as well, not sure if they're the common Spurge that I mistakenly brought back here years past that rewards me for my folly by a glorious green showing, or the "Snow on the Mountain" variety that Miz Mary shared with me last year....time will tell.
Down past the former tomato boxes that now struggles with perennials and the like, finger-like tendrils of leaves tightly clasped against brown stems of my beloved tree peonies that Mary Emma had me dig up are starting to show. With the massive excavation of Smeagol and his "mama", Sugar dawg in the east "tomato" bed, I find myself thinking of planting some of the potted residents in later on as my plans to clean out, pick up and clear is still top of this year's list.
I already started. I took loopers in hand yesterday and whacked every sapling the loppers could get a good bite or, bent two young trees southwards in a humorous attempt at seeing if I can shape the trees to grow bent. I'll cut them later, but it was fun. In the whacking frenzy yesterday, I discovered either three sour cherry saplings or three young black cherry trees growing along the property line where the apple tree is. I'll sacrifice the apple tree this year to free up the space, and keep one cherry tree for the shape she will provide. I might even wind up removing the cherry saplings, but you can actually SEE underneath the farther most apple tree that actually had the character that split in the middle now. As neat as it is, a bon fire needs to be built and the whole thing burnt, as honeysuckle vines are already two inches thick and twining thru the half dead reclining branches.
Back down towards the woods room, I discovered either wild raspberries or insidious blackberry canes had jumped into the midst of the "room", and after the soaking rains and a good pair of rose gloves, will rip them out of the soil and fling them into the pastures westward. I also found three water sprouts growing happily up from the Twisted Filbert or Harry Lauders Walking stick sapling. those will have to go.
I didn't check the Forest Pansy redbud or the Kousa dogwood, but I did go down the crowded pathway to see if the daff's that my son's girlfriend's mom sent me were up next to the fairy rock. Yes indeed, and the woods faeries have blessed me with tucking some ferns in the cracks of the boulder that sits solidly against the main wall of my lower woods. I'll have to find rootlets of other spring ephemerials to tuck in amongst and around the boulder to add to the subtle beauty. Near the side, a young dogwood had appeared and had I not recognized the bark and turn of the ends of the twigs, I'd pulled it up ten years ago. I hope my patience will one day be rewarded by some white blossoms on it.
Still no signs of my red witch hazel, Diane unfurling it's tight cluster of buds. I had to scratch the bark to assure myself it was alive and growing. It's just stubborn. The red and yellow Broom is all green and the thick stake I drove down into the middle of it and used to tie the inner trunks to give it support has greatly improved the structure of the whole bush.
I find crocus in the most amazing places. Where I know I never planted. A single pale yellow one like old china smiles up at me from a distance in the east facing box near the Mock Orange bush. Going to admire her beauty, I discover honeysuckle vines are attempting to strangle this bush and I make mental note to come back with pruners and gloves and rip it out after I cut and unwind it from the branches. To just pull it off will damage the stems of the Mock Orange and any buds it has formed for this year. That reminds me, and I check on the Deutzia that Brudder John has sent me. I see it's now well over three foot in height on some stems and branches and hopefully this year it will wow me with blossoms. It will be my first Deutzia. I'll take cuttings from the smaller branches for more shrubs. The same with my Diablo. I want a few more of those tucked into the woods to see if they'll live happily in semi shade.<g>
My search for those many little pieces of stained glass leads me up the steps of the kitchen deck to the many pots that still sit patiently out in the weather. A stray hint of blue and purple of a stunted hyacinth greets my eye, and I see little fat succulent buds of green of the matrona sedum that I potted up wakening, and one small tight bud of Purple Emperor or some dark sedum that is still struggling from the mis-shipment from Dutch Gardens. They're sending me true Purple Emperor sedums this spring in place of the two mistakes and one puny root that isn't quite dead but not totally alive either.
I must have poked bulbs in everywhere. I see little green shoots poking up thru almost every pot with exception to the large pot I reserve for the tomato's that live on the deck. This year, the seeds sent to me by a kind French man will be germinated by a friend at work who will take plants for starting the seeds and give me the remainder of the plants to tuck in where I can. I see many buckets of rich soil in my future, as I finally have seeds of Aunt Ruby's green and a new one to try called Gertie's Gold, and Black Prince, and all sorts of heirlooms to taste and try and then save seeds to for next year. How I wish I had the open, sunny land to plant every variety that David will start for me. The rest he doesn't start will be lovingly placed in a ziploc bag and stored in the fridge for next year's attempt and garden.
The final twinkling color reveals itself to me as a surprise. I had forgotten about tucking in the large crocus bulbs of the Dutch crocus that usually get planted in force pots. The huge things are rising up all purple and proud in the BBQ fountain garden against the retainer wall and poking thru the protective wire grid I had to lay down after the last digging that devistated me that Sugar STILL insists on regressive behavior. I keep telling her to go dig in the pasture or woods, and not my flowerbeds...............
The air has a wet, cold smell to it and I feel the chill of a front coming thru as I slip inside to download the pictures I took of a few treasures. There will be many, many more. I ended the moment with potting up bare root plants my friend, Dian in Oregon sent me as a birthday present into large nursery pots and rich soils to gather strength until late spring when I tuck them into their places along with the rest of the nursery pots that sit waiting patiently for me to plug them in somewhere.
I fill up the fiberglass window box with black soil and tuck in Amber Waves Heuchera, Sunspot Heuchera that hopefully will bulk up better (they were mere babies from Roots and Rhizomes), a stray sedum to fill a corner and cascade over later on, and some pink Zephyranthes that hopefully will be hardy enough to stave off the cold and flower this summer. if not, I plan to plug in fall Colchicums that I am determined to get this year along with hardy cyclamen and that will make the box a shady one to be placed in various spots around the "yard".
The beds under the black cherry tree are now bursting with green shoots of all the assorted bulbs I tucked into around her feet as I finished and raised up a bed all the way around it, and I'm seeing signs of buds on the variegated Pieris and hopefully returning buds of the Encore azalea. Time will tell, as I will as well.
Thanks for allowing me to share with you.
Madgardener, up on the ridge, back in Faerie Holler, overlooking English Mountain in Eastern Tennessee, zone 7?, Sunset zone 36 (there's talk of kicking us back a notch to 6b again................)
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I'd love to see the honeybee pic Maggie. Send it on over. Murri
<DIV><EM><FONT size=2>Saturday (February 26th)&nbsp;I walked around Faerie Holler and discovered little pieces of stained glass here and there amongst the soft tans, browns and glossy green of the Vinca major.&nbsp; Purple that had a mother of pearl shimmer to it with a dot of yellow at the throat in the random crocus. Stark whites, rich, hot pink peeking out the edge of a black nursery pot from the Species tulip.&nbsp; Deep grape purple's with black spots and white throats and yellow fuzzy mini-beards on Iris reticulata's.&nbsp; Soft and sultry burgundies with kisses of greens and lime's from the Hellebores.&nbsp; </FONT></EM></DIV> <DIV><EM><FONT size=2></FONT></EM>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><EM><FONT size=2>Sky blue with white mingled in like tiny clouds of the blue Iris reticulata's, little bouquets of teeny sulphur yellow flowers on the twig leaf dogwood (Cornus Mas or Cornelian Cherry), rich, buttery yellow's of the early daff's that just couldn't wait and the last two days of low 60's enticed them to spend their energies opening and showing off. I can almost hear their tautes, "we're the first ones!!".&nbsp; </FONT></EM></DIV> <DIV><EM><FONT size=2></FONT></EM>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><EM><FONT size=2>In one pot, a wonderful surprise.&nbsp; The tri-colored Siberian crocus were open. I had forgotten I'd planted them in a cluster, their blue-purple, yellow and white colors weren't enough to make me grin like a lunatic, there was a small honey bee absolutely overjoyed and with fat little pollen pouches working each open blossom. It made my heart swell up with pride that she'd wakened and found my flowers to gather from so early in the season.&nbsp; So intent was she to take every grain of pollen she allowed me to snap a picture of her. (anyone wishing to share in this amazing gift, just holler and I'll JPG it to ya).</FONT></EM></DIV> <DIV><EM><FONT size=2></FONT></EM>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><EM><FONT size=2>The spots of stained glass treasures were scattered about like a spilled box of bright, glistening crystal in delicate shapes.&nbsp; Mostly carved petals of crocus, but the bells of a few Hellebores were chiming a faint toll of eminent spring song.&nbsp; The white freckled faced one underneath the Vitex, who has evident signs of buds forming all along the branches.&nbsp; Tight buds all along seemingly spent stems of every variety of Hydrangea, kissed with plums and rose shades all furled and wrapped tight against the false protection of last years stems.&nbsp; </FONT></EM></DIV> <DIV><EM><FONT size=2></FONT></EM>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><EM><FONT size=2>My Oak Leaf Hydrangea flaking and baring the inner colorations, and seeing that, as the bare stems rose thru the mounded rich soil I had replaced over the emerging crocus that I'd scattered two years ago, that either squirrels or Smagol had disturbed, I walked towards the bare stems of the Diablo nine bark that Grdngal had sent me awhile back.&nbsp; The youth of the shrub was starting to take on the desired appearance of while they're called nine bark.&nbsp; Not quite as majestic as my Oak Leaf's stems, but given the same time, they'll do me proud during Winter's last days one day.</FONT></EM></DIV> <DIV><EM><FONT size=2></FONT></EM>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><EM><FONT size=2>Everywhere I see mocking, shiny green leaves of the Vinca major that if not removed this year will be the undoing of any raised bed or pathway thru them.&nbsp; And I see Euphorbia poking it's little heads up all over as well, not sure if they're the common Spurge that I mistakenly brought back here years past that rewards me for my folly by a glorious green showing, or the "Snow on the Mountain" variety that Miz Mary shared with me last year....time will tell.&nbsp; </FONT></EM></DIV> <DIV><EM><FONT size=2></FONT></EM>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><EM><FONT size=2>Down past the former tomato boxes that now struggles with perennials and the like, finger-like tendrils of leaves tightly clasped against brown stems of my beloved tree peonies that Mary Emma had me dig up are starting to show.&nbsp; With the massive excavation of Smeagol and his "mama", Sugar dawg in the east "tomato" bed, I find myself thinking of planting some of the potted residents in later on as my plans to clean out, pick up and clear is still top of this year's list. </FONT></EM></DIV> <DIV><EM><FONT size=2></FONT></EM>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><EM><FONT size=2>I already started. I took loopers in hand yesterday and whacked every sapling the loppers could get a good bite or, bent two young trees southwards in a humorous attempt at seeing if I can shape the trees to grow bent. I'll cut them later, but it was fun.&nbsp; In the whacking frenzy yesterday, I discovered either three sour cherry saplings or three young black cherry trees growing along the property line where the apple tree is. I'll sacrifice the apple tree this year to free up the space, and keep one cherry tree for the shape she will provide.&nbsp; I might even wind up removing the cherry saplings, but you can actually SEE underneath the farther most apple tree that actually had the character that split in the middle now. As neat as it is, a bon fire needs to be built and the whole thing burnt, as honeysuckle vines are already two inches thick and twining thru the half dead reclining branches.&nbsp; </FONT></EM></DIV> <DIV><EM><FONT size=2></FONT></EM>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><EM><FONT size=2>Back down towards the woods room, I discovered either wild raspberries or insidious blackberry canes had jumped into the midst of the "room", and after the soaking rains and a good pair of rose gloves, will rip them out of the soil and fling them into the pastures westward.&nbsp; I also found three water sprouts growing happily up from the Twisted Filbert or Harry Lauders Walking stick sapling. those will have to go.&nbsp; </FONT></EM></DIV> <DIV><EM><FONT size=2></FONT></EM>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><EM><FONT size=2>I didn't check the Forest Pansy redbud or the Kousa dogwood, but I did go down the crowded pathway to see if the daff's that my son's girlfriend's mom sent me were up next to the fairy rock. Yes indeed, and the woods faeries have blessed me with tucking some ferns in the cracks of the boulder that sits solidly against the main wall of my lower woods.&nbsp; I'll have to find rootlets of other spring ephemerials to tuck in amongst and around the boulder to add to the subtle beauty.&nbsp; Near the side, a young dogwood had appeared and had I not recognized the bark and turn of the ends of the twigs, I'd pulled it up ten years ago.&nbsp; I hope my patience will one day be rewarded by some white blossoms on it.&nbsp; </FONT></EM></DIV> <DIV><EM><FONT size=2></FONT></EM>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><EM><FONT size=2>Still no signs of my red witch hazel, Diane unfurling it's tight cluster of buds. I had to scratch the bark to assure myself it was alive and growing. It's just stubborn.&nbsp; The red and yellow Broom is all green and the thick stake I drove down into the middle of it and used to tie the inner trunks to give it support has greatly improved the structure of the whole bush.&nbsp; </FONT></EM></DIV> <DIV><EM><FONT size=2></FONT></EM>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><EM><FONT size=2>I find crocus in the most amazing places. Where I know I never planted.&nbsp; A single pale yellow one like old&nbsp;china smiles up at me from a distance in the east facing box near the Mock Orange bush.&nbsp; Going to admire her&nbsp;beauty, I discover honeysuckle vines are attempting to strangle this bush and I make mental note to come back with pruners and gloves and rip it out after I cut and unwind it from the branches. To just pull it off will damage the stems of the Mock&nbsp;Orange and any buds it has formed for this year.</FONT></EM></DIV> <DIV><EM><FONT size=2>&nbsp;That reminds me, and I check on the Deutzia that&nbsp;Brudder John has sent me. I see it's now well over three foot in height&nbsp;on some stems and branches and hopefully this year it will wow me with blossoms. It will be my first Deutzia.&nbsp; I'll take cuttings from the smaller branches for more shrubs.&nbsp; The same with my Diablo. I want&nbsp;a few more of those tucked into the woods to see if they'll live happily in semi shade.&lt;g&gt;</FONT></EM></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><EM><FONT size=2>My search for those many little pieces of stained glass leads me up the steps of the kitchen deck to the many pots that still sit patiently out in the weather.&nbsp; A stray hint of blue and purple of a stunted hyacinth greets my eye, and I see little fat succulent buds of green of the matrona sedum that I potted up wakening, and one small tight bud of Purple Emperor or some dark sedum that is still struggling from the mis-shipment&nbsp;from Dutch Gardens. They're sending me true Purple Emperor sedums this spring in place of the two mistakes and one puny root that isn't quite dead but not totally&nbsp;alive either. </FONT></EM></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><EM><FONT size=2>I must have poked bulbs&nbsp;in everywhere.&nbsp; I see little green shoots poking up thru almost every pot with exception to the large pot I reserve for the tomato's that live on the deck.&nbsp; This year, the seeds sent to me by a kind French man will be germinated by a friend at work who will take plants for starting the seeds and give me the remainder of the plants to tuck in where I can. I see many buckets of rich soil in my future, as I finally have seeds of Aunt Ruby's green and a new one to try called Gertie's Gold, and Black Prince, and all sorts of heirlooms to taste and try and then save seeds to&nbsp;for next year.&nbsp; How I wish I had the&nbsp;open, sunny land to plant every variety that David will start for me.&nbsp; The rest he doesn't start will be lovingly placed in a ziploc bag and stored in the fridge for next year's attempt and garden.&nbsp; </FONT></EM></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><EM><FONT size=2>The final twinkling color reveals itself to me as a&nbsp;surprise.&nbsp; I had forgotten about tucking in the large crocus bulbs of the Dutch crocus that usually get planted in force pots.&nbsp; The huge things are rising up all purple and proud in the BBQ fountain garden against the retainer wall and poking thru the protective wire grid I had to lay down after the last digging that devistated me that Sugar STILL insists on regressive behavior.&nbsp; I keep telling her to go dig in the pasture or woods, and not my flowerbeds...............</FONT></EM></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><EM><FONT size=2>The air has a wet, cold smell to it and I feel the chill of a front coming thru as I slip inside to download the pictures I took of a few treasures.&nbsp; There will be many, many more.&nbsp; I ended the moment with potting up bare root plants my friend, Dian in Oregon sent me as a birthday present into large nursery pots and rich soils to gather strength until late spring when I tuck them into their places along with the rest of the nursery pots that sit waiting patiently for me to plug them in somewhere.&nbsp; </FONT></EM></DIV> <DIV><EM><FONT size=2></FONT></EM>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><EM><FONT size=2>I fill up the fiberglass window box with black soil and tuck in Amber Waves Heuchera, Sunspot Heuchera that hopefully will bulk up better (they were mere babies from Roots and Rhizomes), a stray sedum to fill a corner and cascade over later on, and some pink Zephyranthes that hopefully will be hardy enough to stave off the cold and flower this summer.&nbsp; if not, I plan to plug in fall Colchicums that I am determined to get this year along with hardy cyclamen and that will make the box&nbsp;a shady one to be placed in various spots around the "yard".&nbsp; </FONT></EM></DIV> <DIV><EM><FONT size=2></FONT></EM>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><EM><FONT size=2>The beds under the black cherry tree are now bursting with green shoots of all the assorted bulbs I tucked into around her feet as I finished and raised up a bed all the way around it, and I'm seeing signs of buds on the variegated Pieris and hopefully returning buds of the Encore azalea.&nbsp; Time will tell, as I will as well.</FONT></EM></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><EM><FONT size=2>Thanks for allowing me to share with you.&nbsp; </FONT></EM>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><EM><FONT size=2></FONT></EM>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><EM><FONT size=2>Madgardener, up on the ridge, back in Faerie Holler, overlooking English Mountain in Eastern Tennessee, zone 7?, Sunset zone 36 (there's talk of kicking us back a notch to 6b again................)</FONT></EM></DIV></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>
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this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.
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ok!!! i'm HOLLERING...could you .jpg me a pic? i'd just love to have it....and i do believe the fact that i'm using a mac and you are prolly not will make any difference in the world, as long as you DO call it .jpg.
the indescribable appearancec of stained glass bits in mossy areas of the garden are terrific, especially when the moonlight hits them.
i'd really appreciate it, if you could and i thank you, in advance.
Newsgroups: rec.gardens Date: Thu, 10 Mar 2005 00:54:10 -0500 Subject: Re: Little pieces of stained glass
I'd love to see the honeybee pic Maggie. Send it on over. Murri
<FONT SIZE="2"><I>Saturday (February 26th) I walked around Faerie Holler and discovered little pieces of stained glass here and there amongst the soft tans, browns and glossy green of the Vinca major. &nbsp;Purple that had a mother of pearl shimmer to it with a dot of yellow at the throat in the random crocus. Stark whites, rich, hot pink peeking out the edge of a black nursery pot from the Species tulip. &nbsp;Deep grape purple's with black spots and white throats and yellow fuzzy mini-beards on Iris reticulata's. &nbsp;Soft and sultry burgundies with kisses of greens and lime's from the Hellebores. &nbsp;<BR> </I></FONT> <BR> <FONT SIZE="2"><I>Sky blue with white mingled in like tiny clouds of the blue Iris reticulata's, little bouquets of teeny sulphur yellow flowers on the twig leaf dogwood (Cornus Mas or Cornelian Cherry), rich, buttery yellow's of the early daff's that just couldn't wait and the last two days of low 60's enticed them to spend their energies opening and showing off. I can almost hear their tautes, &quot;we're the first ones!!&quot;. &nbsp;<BR> </I></FONT> <BR> <FONT SIZE="2"><I>In one pot, a wonderful surprise. &nbsp;The tri-colored Siberian crocus were open. I had forgotten I'd planted them in a cluster, their blue-purple, yellow and white colors weren't enough to make me grin like a lunatic, there was a small honey bee absolutely overjoyed and with fat little pollen pouches working each open blossom. It made my heart swell up with pride that she'd wakened and found my flowers to gather from so early in the season. &nbsp;So intent was she to take every grain of pollen she allowed me to snap a picture of her. (anyone wishing to share in this amazing gift, just holler and I'll JPG it to ya).<BR> </I></FONT> <BR> <FONT SIZE="2"><I>The spots of stained glass treasures were scattered about like a spilled box of bright, glistening crystal in delicate shapes. &nbsp;Mostly carved petals of crocus, but the bells of a few Hellebores were chiming a faint toll of eminent spring song. &nbsp;The white freckled faced one underneath the Vitex, who has evident signs of buds forming all along the branches. &nbsp;Tight buds all along seemingly spent stems of every variety of Hydrangea, kissed with plums and rose shades all furled and wrapped tight against the false protection of last years stems. &nbsp;<BR> </I></FONT> <BR> <FONT SIZE="2"><I>My Oak Leaf Hydrangea flaking and baring the inner colorations, and seeing that, as the bare stems rose thru the mounded rich soil I had replaced over the emerging crocus that I'd scattered two years ago, that either squirrels or Smagol had disturbed, I walked towards the bare stems of the Diablo nine bark that Grdngal had sent me awhile back. &nbsp;The youth of the shrub was starting to take on the desired appearance of while they're called nine bark. &nbsp;Not quite as majestic as my Oak Leaf's stems, but given the same time, they'll do me proud during Winter's last days one day.<BR> </I></FONT> <BR> <FONT SIZE="2"><I>Everywhere I see mocking, shiny green leaves of the Vinca major that if not removed this year will be the undoing of any raised bed or pathway thru them. &nbsp;And I see Euphorbia poking it's little heads up all over as well, not sure if they're the common Spurge that I mistakenly brought back here years past that rewards me for my folly by a glorious green showing, or the &quot;Snow on the Mountain&quot; variety that Miz Mary shared with me last year....time will tell. &nbsp;<BR> </I></FONT> <BR> <FONT SIZE="2"><I>Down past the former tomato boxes that now struggles with perennials and the like, finger-like tendrils of leaves tightly clasped against brown stems of my beloved tree peonies that Mary Emma had me dig up are starting to show. &nbsp;With the massive excavation of Smeagol and his &quot;mama&quot;, Sugar dawg in the east &quot;tomato&quot; bed, I find myself thinking of planting some of the potted residents in later on as my plans to clean out, pick up and clear is still top of this year's list. <BR> </I></FONT> <BR> <FONT SIZE="2"><I>I already started. I took loopers in hand yesterday and whacked every sapling the loppers could get a good bite or, bent two young trees southwards in a humorous attempt at seeing if I can shape the trees to grow bent. I'll cut them later, but it was fun. &nbsp;In the whacking frenzy yesterday, I discovered either three sour cherry saplings or three young black cherry trees growing along the property line where the apple tree is. I'll sacrifice the apple tree this year to free up the space, and keep one cherry tree for the shape she will provide. &nbsp;I might even wind up removing the cherry saplings, but you can actually SEE underneath the farther most apple tree that actually had the character that split in the middle now. As neat as it is, a bon fire needs to be built and the whole thing burnt, as honeysuckle vines are already two inches thick and twining thru the half dead reclining branches. &nbsp;<BR> </I></FONT> <BR> <FONT SIZE="2"><I>Back down towards the woods room, I discovered either wild raspberries or insidious blackberry canes had jumped into the midst of the &quot;room&quot;, and after the soaking rains and a good pair of rose gloves, will rip them out of the soil and fling them into the pastures westward. &nbsp;I also found three water sprouts growing happily up from the Twisted Filbert or Harry Lauders Walking stick sapling. those will have to go. &nbsp;<BR> </I></FONT> <BR> <FONT SIZE="2"><I>I didn't check the Forest Pansy redbud or the Kousa dogwood, but I did go down the crowded pathway to see if the daff's that my son's girlfriend's mom sent me were up next to the fairy rock. Yes indeed, and the woods faeries have blessed me with tucking some ferns in the cracks of the boulder that sits solidly against the main wall of my lower woods. &nbsp;I'll have to find rootlets of other spring ephemerials to tuck in amongst and around the boulder to add to the subtle beauty. &nbsp;Near the side, a young dogwood had appeared and had I not recognized the bark and turn of the ends of the twigs, I'd pulled it up ten years ago. &nbsp;I hope my patience will one day be rewarded by some white blossoms on it. &nbsp;<BR> </I></FONT> <BR> <FONT SIZE="2"><I>Still no signs of my red witch hazel, Diane unfurling it's tight cluster of buds. I had to scratch the bark to assure myself it was alive and growing. It's just stubborn. &nbsp;The red and yellow Broom is all green and the thick stake I drove down into the middle of it and used to tie the inner trunks to give it support has greatly improved the structure of the whole bush. &nbsp;<BR> </I></FONT> <BR> <FONT SIZE="2"><I>I find crocus in the most amazing places. Where I know I never planted. &nbsp;A single pale yellow one like old china smiles up at me from a distance in the east facing box near the Mock Orange bush. &nbsp;Going to admire her beauty, I discover honeysuckle vines are attempting to strangle this bush and I make mental note to come back with pruners and gloves and rip it out after I cut and unwind it from the branches. To just pull it off will damage the stems of the Mock Orange and any buds it has formed for this year.<BR> That reminds me, and I check on the Deutzia that Brudder John has sent me. I see it's now well over three foot in height on some stems and branches and hopefully this year it will wow me with blossoms. It will be my first Deutzia. &nbsp;I'll take cuttings from the smaller branches for more shrubs. &nbsp;The same with my Diablo. I want a few more of those tucked into the woods to see if they'll live happily in semi shade.&lt;g&gt;<BR> </I></FONT> <BR> <FONT SIZE="2"><I>My search for those many little pieces of stained glass leads me up the steps of the kitchen deck to the many pots that still sit patiently out in the weather. &nbsp;A stray hint of blue and purple of a stunted hyacinth greets my eye, and I see little fat succulent buds of green of the matrona sedum that I potted up wakening, and one small tight bud of Purple Emperor or some dark sedum that is still struggling from the mis-shipment from Dutch Gardens. They're sending me true Purple Emperor sedums this spring in place of the two mistakes and one puny root that isn't quite dead but not totally alive either. <BR> </I></FONT> <BR> <FONT SIZE="2"><I>I must have poked bulbs in everywhere. &nbsp;I see little green shoots poking up thru almost every pot with exception to the large pot I reserve for the tomato's that live on the deck. &nbsp;This year, the seeds sent to me by a kind French man will be germinated by a friend at work who will take plants for starting the seeds and give me the remainder of the plants to tuck in where I can. I see many buckets of rich soil in my future, as I finally have seeds of Aunt Ruby's green and a new one to try called Gertie's Gold, and Black Prince, and all sorts of heirlooms to taste and try and then save seeds to for next year. &nbsp;How I wish I had the open, sunny land to plant every variety that David will start for me. &nbsp;The rest he doesn't start will be lovingly placed in a ziploc bag and stored in the fridge for next year's attempt and garden. &nbsp;<BR> </I></FONT> <BR> <FONT SIZE="2"><I>The final twinkling color reveals itself to me as a surprise. &nbsp;I had forgotten about tucking in the large crocus bulbs of the Dutch crocus that usually get planted in force pots. &nbsp;The huge things are rising up all purple and proud in the BBQ fountain garden against the retainer wall and poking thru the protective wire grid I had to lay down after the last digging that devistated me that Sugar STILL insists on regressive behavior. &nbsp;I keep telling her to go dig in the pasture or woods, and not my flowerbeds...............<BR> </I></FONT> <BR> <FONT SIZE="2"><I>The air has a wet, cold smell to it and I feel the chill of a front coming thru as I slip inside to download the pictures I took of a few treasures. &nbsp;There will be many, many more. &nbsp;I ended the moment with potting up bare root plants my friend, Dian in Oregon sent me as a birthday present into large nursery pots and rich soils to gather strength until late spring when I tuck them into their places along with the rest of the nursery pots that sit waiting patiently for me to plug them in somewhere. &nbsp;<BR> </I></FONT> <BR> <FONT SIZE="2"><I>I fill up the fiberglass window box with black soil and tuck in Amber Waves Heuchera, Sunspot Heuchera that hopefully will bulk up better (they were mere babies from Roots and Rhizomes), a stray sedum to fill a corner and cascade over later on, and some pink Zephyranthes that hopefully will be hardy enough to stave off the cold and flower this summer. &nbsp;if not, I plan to plug in fall Colchicums that I am determined to get this year along with hardy cyclamen and that will make the box a shady one to be placed in various spots around the &quot;yard&quot;. &nbsp;<BR> </I></FONT> <BR> <FONT SIZE="2"><I>The beds under the black cherry tree are now bursting with green shoots of all the assorted bulbs I tucked into around her feet as I finished and raised up a bed all the way around it, and I'm seeing signs of buds on the variegated Pieris and hopefully returning buds of the Encore azalea. &nbsp;Time will tell, as I will as well.<BR> </I></FONT> <BR> <FONT SIZE="2"><I>Thanks for allowing me to share with you. &nbsp;</I></FONT> <BR> <BR> <FONT SIZE="2"><I>Madgardener, up on the ridge, back in Faerie Holler, overlooking English Mountain in Eastern Tennessee, zone 7?, Sunset zone 36 (there's talk of kicking us back a notch to 6b again................)<BR> </I></FONT></BLOCKQUOTE><BR> </BLOCKQUOTE><BR> </BODY> </HTML>
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SKYlark wrote:

Posting in HTML is frowned upon.
--

Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
USDA Zone 8b
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Complaining at others is also frowned upon. Murri

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<g> yeppers

bits
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and this is why I won't post it here, Travis......sheesh....... maddie

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I loved the pictures! It was almost 70 here today so I worked out in my gardens. Of course there are no flowers except daffodils and a few crocuses yet. I am edging all my beds this year. I also planted 4 roses that I bought at Sam's last week. 2 of them are Mr. Lincoln and 2 are Sonia. Not bad for $10 apiece, I thought. I'm SO ready for spring!
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and....this means that person could not send it to me in private email????

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SKYlark wrote:

You and your correspondents may send each other anything you like.
Posting HTML in newsgroups is frowned upon.
--

Travis in Shoreline Washington

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and that sucking sound is the unmistakable sound of someone being a bit anal. And just when does posting a JPG of a gardening wonder constitute being frowned upon? And just to let you know, without meaning to be smart ass or sarcastic, Travis, I'm sure you're a fine person and a great gardener, but honestly, if you feel you need to frown upon me, honey you just go right ahead and crease those frown lines. I'll just grin at you like some idiot madgardener and roll my eyes and notice that you haven't smelled the sarcasm. You can frown all you want, but all you hafta do it just notice that my posting a JPG doesn't hafta be opened up or viewed. Not everyone visits the alt.bianaries.gardens.pictures newsgroup (and I don't get nearly a fourth of the wonderful pictures I see responses to anyway, so I hardly bother. )
I mean, whattaya gonna do, break my trowel? Banish me to the compost heap? Forbid me to go cow pie picking next door in the pasture? Or ground me and not allow me to play with the faeries? You need to lighten up and either go buy a new plant or go out and search for bulb tongues poking outa the ground honey...............................
So you just let that frown rip outa you and maybe you'll feel better. And I won't tell anyone if you sneak a peek at my sweet honey bee overwhelmed and overloaded to the saddlebags with Siberian Tri-color crocus pollen......................LOL madgardener up on the stormy ridge, back in a cooling off Faerie Holler, which is overlooking lightening and jagged arch's of blue illumination over English Mountain in EAstern Tennessee, zone 7, Sunset zone 36 where spring kissed us today with temperatures of 74o and tomorrow will bring the climate down to the upper 40's.......ahhhhh pre-spring Tennessee <GBSEG>

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madgardener wrote:

The following things can happen when a binary is posted in a non-binary group:
1. Some servers won't even accept the message.
2. People on dial-up, especially those that pay by the minute, may find themselves paying for crap they didn't want in the first place.
3. Most servers allocate a certain amount of space for each group based on whether the group is a discussion or binary group. Essentially everytime someone posts a text message in a text group, an old message is deleted. When someone posts a binary, a couple hundred old messages may end up deleted. Not a big deal if there was three or four months worth of messages there, but a big deal if the server in question only had about a week's worth of messages. One big picture could delete a lot of messages that people didn't get a chance to read yet.
Essentially, posting a binary in a discussion group is an extremely selfish thing to do. Perhaps the most selfish thing someone can do on Usenet. It's on par with draining the community well to water your garden, even though it means others may go dry.
But if you're so sure that you're more important that the whole community, go right ahead and show us how selfish you can be.
Posting in html is better than posting a binary, but it's still pretty selfish. Not everyone uses an html newsreader, and some who do turn off html to lessen the risk of getting a virus or acquiring a trojan. Posting in html says that you think what you have to say is more important than practicing safe computing practices.
Why do you need a fancy font, anyway? Does a fancy font make the message better? Does it mean that the words are not enough?
But again, if you feel you're more important than the rest of us, go right ahead.
You must be fun to follow at the buffet table.
--
Warren H.

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Warren wrote:

Thank you Warren. You are a much better wordsmith than I.
--

Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
USDA Zone 8b
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i happen to be on dial-up, sweetums, and if i see a posting that has an attachment with .jpg, .mpg, .wav, etc., i DO NOT HAVE TO OPEN IT UNLESS I WANT TO!!!!!
madgardener's description was so wonderful i JUST HAD TO SEE IT!!! even at 56K!!!!!
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SKYlark wrote:

So everyone is the same as you?
We had a discussion about off-line newsreading a couple of weeks ago. In case you missed that one, one of the ways people deal with dial-up is to automatically download the whole group, and then read it off-line. The advantage is that you don't tie-up the phone line while you're reading, and deciding what messages to download.
If someone goes and posts a binary to a non-binary group, it will automatically be queued-up with the rest of the messages for download. The options are to either put up with some self-centered person who doesn't understand that their binary file doesn't belong in a discussion group, or take the time every, single day to manually choose which messages to download, and which messages not to download.
In other words just because you've found a way to lessen the impact of selfish posters that works for you doesn't mean that your method will work for everyone, or even anyone, else. It's like saying I'm a good enough driver that I can avoid getting hit by a drunk driver, so why can't everyone else?
Please don't justify the selfish actions of others by blaming the victims..
--
Warren H.

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Also, some people skim through newsgroups by hitting CTRL+U, which automatically takes them to the next message. This is particularly helpful when there are a lot of older posts on the server and you don't want to keep scrolling to find the next unread one. If an HTML or binary post is among them, the CTRL+U method will download it before the reader is even aware it is an HTML/binary post. --S.
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4. Binary or HTML posts can sometimes cause older computers to freeze up. This has happened to me occasionally--I've had to completely turn the computer off and log on again.
I don't know why the simple netiquette rules should be so hard to follow. A mistake now and then is expected, but the declarations of being able to do exactly as one wants, regardless of the rest of the group, escapes me. --S.
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madgardener wrote:

<big snip>
You posted in plain text.
Thank you.
--

Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
USDA Zone 8b
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For goodness sake, M, don't shoot the messengers for politely passing on the basic facts of usenet life you were blithely ignorant of :-) Travis and Warren are right on all counts.
Next week; the truth about the tooth fairy.
Janet.
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Lady Blacksword wrote:

It is bad form to post in HTML.
--

Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
USDA Zone 8b
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