lean-to greenhouse or cold frame kit?

I am in a situation where we are buying a new house. It is currently undergoing roughly $23k in repairs under the FHA 203k rehab loan program. After they are done, we will move in, probably about the end of February.
It will begin warming up soon after, so of course I find myself thinking of what I want garden-wise, if I want to plant some fruit trees, that sort of thing.
I've always wanted a small lean-to greenhouse, and I've realized that something like that might be a possibility with this place. The house is oriented in the long direction north-south, but has a garage on the south end, with no trees and plenty of light. Space would be tight, though, because the south edge of the house/garage is only about 12' from the property line. I'm not sure if I could even put anything permanent in there large enough to walk around in, but I'm open to suggestions.
At the very least, I would like to lengthen my gardening season. If a lean-to greenhouse turns out not to be an option, then I'd like to mess around with a cold frame there. I've never built a cold frame before, but I have worked with them at an arboretum.
Can anybody point me to some lean-to greenhouse kits or cold frame kits that could help me get something along these lines done in a quick fashion? Thanks!
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wrote:

http://attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/solar-gh.html
Look at the resources link.
Bill
--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA


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If it needs $23,000.00 in repairs it is NOT a new house.

You should check with your Town to find out what the set back code restrictions are, I doubt you will be permitted to erect any permanent structure within 12' of your property line (and I can promise your neighbors will turn you in), and often municipalities will reassess your property taxes for any additions; an attached greenhouse constitutes an all season permanent addition (you may be much better off with a stand alone greenhouse - many people incorporate a greenhouse with a shed), an attached structure will also increase your homeowner's insurance. In many municipalities one even needs a permit to erect a shed, even a fence, most anything. I would also strongly suggest living there a minimum of one full year before investing in a greenhouse, or any other major improvement, take time to experience the lay of the land... you may even decide to move... that you're purchasing an FHA rehab indicates you are very borderline home ownership material... before investing any big bucks you should wait until you know if you can actually afford to live there... if you just gotta play in the dirt come spring plant a few annuals... you can't possibly know where to put in a veggie garden until next year let alone a green house. Have patience
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>If it needs $23,000.00 in repairs it is NOT a new house.
Ok, granted, I mean new to us house. It's the same when I get a 'new' pair of shoes - they tend to be ones worn a couple of times, or never, and taken to the local thrift store because somebody didn't like the color. It is a 30 year old home that someone neglected - didn't repair the roof when it needed it, etc.
>that you're purchasing an FHA rehab indicates you are very borderline >home
Actually, we have our current home 100% paid off, so we have a decent amount of equity. We are not selling this home to purchase the new one - prices are very depressed in the area right now, and we would take a loss. Instead, we are renting it out after we move (20 minutes away), and using the rent to fund our IRA.
Simply put, the FHA 203k rehab program had a lot of perks that made it a better deal for us, such as them chipping in up to 2% of the cost of the home towards closing costs, and several other worthy benefits. Even with the roughly $23k in repairs, we are paying ~ $35k less than the house sold for 3 years ago, when it still needed lots of repairs.
Best news: after we closed on the house, it was announced that Caterpillar is opening a facility with 600 jobs just a mile away. That can't hurt the value of the house!
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Isn't what you are doing illegal... I was under the impression that the FHA program is for first time home buyers only.
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brooklyn1;876237 Wrote: > On Sun, 31 Jan 2010 10:56:57 -0500, Ohioguy snipped-for-privacy@none.net wrote:

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Why not just use cold frames or purchase a cold frame greenhouse for now. These are all portable, easy to either build or set up from kits, and can add a few more growing weeks at either end of the season. Amazon handles some of the portable cold frame greenhouses, or you can easily make one from ideas and articles online.
--
Nicki Goff


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wrote:

Got me thinking about something I read about once. A chicken coop with rabbits that doubled as a small greenhouse. Seemed rabbits were feed above and the missed food dropped to the chickens. Plants were nearby (Protected) except for Russian Broadleaf Comfy which the chickens nibbled on. The manure helped warm the place.
Omnivores Dilemma Pollan's book sort of touch on this I recall in a way.
<http://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=chicken+coop+greenho use&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8>
Bill
--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA


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