Leaking hose fitting problem

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I'm at my wit's end on this one. I don't remember this ever being a problem until recently.
Where ever I have a hose connection, it leaks like a sieve. And by leaks I mean it sprays a narrow jet of water 10 feet. It happens where my hose meets my faucet and the other end of my hose regardless of what it's attached to. It happens with my leader hose to my hose reel. It happens with my timer. It happens with all sprinklers and hand sprayers. I have replaced the washers. In fact I have replaced everything except the faucets themselves. But since this problem occurs from one end to the other I don't think the faucet themselves are bad. Something else is wrong.
Is there anything I can do to eliminate this problem? The person at the local home improvement store didn't seem to understand my problem and thought my hose had a hole or tear in it. That's not the problem. Let me know if I'm not being descriptive enough.
Thanks, John
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John Mayson < snipped-for-privacy@mayson.us>
Austin, Texas, USA
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John Mayson wrote:

I don't understand the problem either. What kind of hose connection do you use? Where exactly does the water come out?
A guess (only a guess at this point) is that you are using a plastic snap fitting system and the O rings have come off the male ends of the fittings.
David
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I was going to suggest it might be a bad batch / incorrect / very old washers .... but it would probably be obvious if that was the problem - as soon as you removed the connection & double-checked the washer. ... good luck. John T.
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On Wed, 7 Sep 2011, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.com wrote:

I bought yet another bag of washers. Same problem.
I never had this problem until recently. And like I said before I honestly replaced every single hose and the problem persists.
John
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John Mayson < snipped-for-privacy@mayson.us>
Austin, Texas, USA
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John Mayson wrote:

You still haven't said exactly where the water comes out or what kind of connections you are using.
D
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wrote:

No, he hasn't answered that but I suspect he's not using 'click clack' type fittings. If he was then the problem would be easily fixed. I've found them to be the best thing since the invention of the flush toilet. With the 'click clacks', I've found that it's either minor operator error or a tiny part (washer or 'O' ring) needs replacing. As a gardener, I love those fittings.
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On Thu, 8 Sep 2011, David Hare-Scott wrote:

I thought I had.
It comes out where the hose connects to whatever accessory I'm using and where the hose connects to the faucet. It's the standard connections included with such items.
It's never a slow drip. It's a high pressure stream that shoots quite a distance. A slow drip I could live with.
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John Mayson < snipped-for-privacy@mayson.us>
Austin, Texas, USA
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John Mayson wrote:

What connections are "standard connections"? I know of several sorts, this is an international forum no doubt there are more about than I know of.
Since you describe the hose and what you are using as separate I assume you are using a snap fitting. This has a male end that snaps into a female socket and can be released by pulling back a sleeve. Is that right?
So the water comes out between the male plug and the female sleeve is that right?
If both of these are right then there are two ways you have a leak. One; the O ring has come off the male plug or is faulty or the wrong size. You should be able to see a rubbery ring sitting in a groove around the plug and it should be tight and free of damage. Two; you have mixed fittings from different manufacturers and they are not compatible. You say this problem started recently. Did you by any chance by some new fittings? Are they the same brand as the rest?
If all else fails give us a photograph.
David
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On Fri, 9 Sep 2011 09:26:18 +1000, "David Hare-Scott"

Already said he uses washers, that zeros in on standard threaded couplings rather than the quick disconnect type. After all the desciptives the one area that wasn't mentioned is how the hose is attached to the fitting, I've had those kind of leakers several times and typically that type of leak will spray in a long stream. Sometimes with cheap bargain hoses they'll leak at a poor fitting to hose crimp from brand new. When a hose is still essentially serviceable but leaks at the fitting crimp or one needs a short length of hose there are fittings one can crimp on themself. The short length of hose from a hose reel to hose bib is typically poor quality and will leak at the crimp... I've often made up a new hose reel connector hose from better quality components. My house has five hose bibs, one at my garage door is tempered water for washing vehicals with warm water... all have a hose reel. I maintain a fairly extensive hose repair kit. When it comes to tools and hardware I buy the best quality I can find, the cheap turns out expensive.
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Brooklyn1 wrote:

Yes as far as getting a fitting on to a threaded hose cock that is true, they all require a washer at that point.
After all the

Yup. There are several ways to do that including the instant snap on type in both brass and plastic, and semi-permanent sort with a metal hose clamp around the hose. This is the part that is unclear.
D
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On Fri, 9 Sep 2011 14:16:50 +1000, "David Hare-Scott"

Would've helped a lot in diagnosing the problem had the OP sent pictures of the charged hose actually spraying... I'm not clear on whether the problem is with the compression washer or the fitting to hose crimp. All I can say is that I've never had a leaking hose connection that I couldn't diagnose immediately and repair if repairable... sometimes a length of hose is just too old/corroded to bother with, then it gets saved to use as anti-chaffing material for staking... lengths of hose slit longitudinally makes great contractor bucket handles, slip them over the skinny plastic handle for a larger diameter more comfortable grip. Lots of times a piece of garden hose is the perfect remedy... with all the high humidity lately I put a dehumidifier in my basement, placing it on a couple of short lengths of old garden hose quenched the vibration and stopped the noise, also stopped it from creeping across the basement floor on it's tiny hard plastic wheels, twice it had pulled its plug out of the wall recepticle. If anyone needs a dehumidifier buy a SoleusAir, I have two upstairs, they work very well, they don't vibrate and they're so quiet I can't tell they're running except from seeing the pilot lights lit.... when that big Westinghouse monster in the basement dies I will replace it with the larger size SoleusAir The SoleusAir is nice looking too... Amazon has them and at the lowest price... I have one of these at each end of my house: (Amazon.com product link shortened)15577542&sr=8-2
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Nope.
"Standard" means nothing in an international unsenet forum.
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On 9/7/2011 9:44 PM, John Mayson wrote:

I am still totally confused by your problem and I suspect that others are also. One way you might clarify the situation would be to photograph the leak in progress in as much detail as you can and post the picture(s) where we would be able to access them. The fact that you are seeing a stream of water really tells me nothing but seeing the stream of water and from where it sprays would tell volumes. A picture or two of the spray in situ and of the inside of the hose connection and washer and of the end of the faucet threads if you please?
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wrote:

A good beginning but we also need x-rays, a sonogram, and an MRI... has anyone ever given a garden hose a proctoscopy... I think you first need to run a couple gallons of Gatorade through. lol
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On 9/7/2011 4:59 PM, John Mayson wrote:

might have to tighten with pliers but that usually solves problem. On one, I did have to replace the hose end as they can sometimes fail (crack?).
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On Wed, 7 Sep 2011, Frank wrote:

Which raises another question. I don't exactly have to force these washers in. In fact they could be a little bigger. They have a slightly less diameter than the inside of the (whatever I've attached to the hose). Am I buying the wrong washers? So far I've seen Home Depot and Lowe's sells a grand total of one type each so I don't have much of a choice. Today I'm going to an actual, real hardware store. They might have more of a selection.
John
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John Mayson < snipped-for-privacy@mayson.us>
Austin, Texas, USA
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On Thu, 8 Sep 2011, John Mayson wrote:

Okay, I give up.
I got the same confused look at this hardware store. They had an assortment of washers and he sent me home with ones larger and more pliable than what I had before. I went home during lunch and tried them. No change.
Thanks all for the help, but I really give up.
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John Mayson < snipped-for-privacy@mayson.us>
Austin, Texas, USA
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On 9/8/2011 2:16 PM, John Mayson wrote:

your problem.
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It sounds like there has been an increase in the pressure of the water AND/OR you are in a high mineral area that may have corroded the connections. We had a leak at the faucet itself start because of corrosion. One way to check for increased pressure is simply turn down the amount of water coming out of spigot. Often, we have stopped leaks with Teflon tape. One other thing. There are different types of fittings, the PVC types dont fit with "garden hose" types at all. I dont think that is your problem.

Somewhere between zone 5 and 6 tucked along the shore of Lake Michigan on the council grounds of the Fox, Mascouten, Potawatomi, and Winnebago
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On 9/7/2011 4:59 PM, John Mayson wrote:

Identical problem with more than one faucet? If so then you have either a disastrous coincidence or the items you are attaching are damaged or defective or misapplied.
To use a question I always seem to end up using when troubleshooting computer problems: You say that there was no problem 'until recently'. What happened immediately before 'recently'? Something clearly changed whether it was intentional or not and knowing what changed will probably answer your original question.
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