Leaf Mold, Do Tell..

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says...

Wow... That's kinky.
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On Sun, 14 Oct 2007 02:38:46 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@THE-DOMAIN-IN.SIG

You've defiled something and someone very sacred to me.
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No, I plant shrubs and trees meanly too. Experience has taught me they do better that way.
Wouldn't

I grew trees for 20 years, and have planted out (by hand) literally thousands in reforesting schemes. In my own garden, I tried the big hole/compost and peat way, and found they don't do so well. They do far better if you plant them as small as possible, in a hole as small as possible (even, just a spade T slit for small bare-root trees), and do NOT add any organic matter to the planting hole whatever. That encourages the roots to stay crammed together in the unnaturally rich confines of the planting hole. Trees establish, grow and thrive best when their roots are hungry, so quickly strike out far and wide into undisturbed soil, in their search for food.
So far as sharp drainage requirements go; organic matter holds more water, like a sponge. So putting a bucketful of peat or OM in a tree planting hole, means that soil touching the roots will stay wetter. If you want to create sharp drainage in a naturally damp soil you'd do better to incorporate stones and pea gravel instead.
Janet.
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On Thu, 11 Oct 2007 17:20:34 +0100, Janet Baraclough

Well, I'm convinced... and pleased that less work appears to be another benefit. Even what I have been doing has had great results; less weeds, increased production, increased plant population (which results in cooler soil temps and a living mulch canopy) and very few bad bugs. I am looking forward to this. This sounds like it could easily be implemented on a large scale.
Thanks.
Care Charlie
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Charlie wrote:

Well... I'm glad my simplistic question has sparked a less is more conversation. However hard to follow at times that it may be, still entertaining and informative... And what seems to be helpful to alot of you.. :)
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On Thu, 11 Oct 2007 21:48:22 -0500, Scott Hildenbrand

It sure was helpful and I *will* remember that your question sparked it all. Perhaps many of my descendants will be appreciative as well.
Funny the effect a small, simple act, or question, can have... and that is well worth my remembering! This applies to many things.
Care, and thank you Scott Charlie
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On Wed, 10 Oct 2007 12:26:31 -0400, William Wagner

See my post aways down below re: Household Compost Activator
Charlie, listening to, believe it or not, Jonn Serrie - Yuletides
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<S>

LOL... Fair enough in my book and works for me.. :)
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wrote:

Cheap is right! I picked up a fifty pounder at the feed store today for a whole whoppin' ten bucks.
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<Charlie> wrote in message> wrote:

mornings.
until
Yep, and because it's feed, there's no tax. Something else I like to pick up is dry molasses. That's mostly a feel good thing for me, although they say it stimulates beneficial microorganisms. It has trace elements, but I like the smell, especially when I play around making aerobic teas.......
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wrote:

Whoa! Aerobic teas... you didn't finish and just left me hangin'! what? I gotta research this myself?
This has opened up a whole new area of fun.
Does this link provide a good idea of what you are talking about?
http://www.westvalleyrose.org/roseinfo/alfalfatea.html
They have recipes that add canned mackeral and all sorts of goodies.
Man, we have to be talkin' some seriously good odours!
Again, thanks.
Charlie
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<Charlie> wrote in message> wrote:

pick
Yeah, well.......... didn't want to bring out the pro- or anti- zealots particularly, and it was late. I tried, but deleted whatever else I was going to say about it. Discussion of tea making makes the discussion of composting methods pale in comparison.

Yeah, that's the same as one of my links.
Here's another with a list of what's in alfalfa tea, although it's not aerobic with an air bubbler, and will smell like a cow produced it. http://www.nurserysite.com/clubs/peninsular/tea.html

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My dad used to empty out his freezer once or twice a year. He is known to place old fish and other expired food stuffs in large glass containers which fermented out in the garden. He then mixed a cup or two with a gal of water which he feed to weak or sickly plants especially ones with insects. We knew when he worked this magic and did other things for a day two.
Bill
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On Sat, 13 Oct 2007 15:47:35 -0400, William Wagner

More good ideas, thanks.
Your Dad sounds like someone I would like to know or have known.
You are fortunate, as are your "boys".
Charlie, listening to Clapton's "Old Love". Perfect day here for slow blues
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not
In the big picture, something's always food for something else. So, whatever it was your dad was fermenting, either it was good in and of itself, or it fed or attracted something that was, most probably. That's what attracts me to the alchemy of making teas, although I do prefer the more pleasant smelling kind.
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wrote:

After reading, and thinking, about this at some length today, I understand why it was simpler for you to just put up a roadsign.
Thanks.
Charlie
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<Charlie> wrote in message> wrote:

I just can't commit to extended conversations these days, and there was quite the extended one here in the past on compost teas. I even joined a Yahoo group about it, and there are some very passionate people researching the subject, most with some quite interesting contraptions to sell you....... So, I just enjoy the alchemy, whether it's voodoo or not.
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wrote:

Honor and respect. Relationships. Our blessings come from the community of the soil organisms and we should be willing to give back to the community in return for what it has brought forth. I now see that this is about community and respect. We should be active partipants in this process, not just takers. We are a part of this community and our respect and participation is required. Connectedness. Balance. The soil devours all, yet brings forth all.
It is mystical and magical, this web of interconnectedness that we so often fail to perceive and respect.
Wow, thanks for the boost.
Charlie
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<Charlie> wrote in message> wrote:

****** "It is mystical and magical, this web of interconnectedness that we so often fail to perceive and respect."****** -Charlie
And this is most sig worthy!

And thank you for writing so eloquently on a wide range of related subjects. This place is much more interesting because of your contributions. Much appreciated.
Not to put a great deal of significance into where I am now, but my first memory from childhood is sitting in a bare flowerbed, looking for the "germs"..........
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wrote:

Now it is my turn to be honoured.

Aw shuck's, I jes' be a simple country boy. Thank you. I'm always trying to learn from and stimulate, both IRL and in the digital world Sometimes it just takes different approaches with different folks, eh?
M. Scott Peck wrote, and this is just a paraphrase of the idea, that marriages, and thus by implication other relationships, only thrive and grow as a result of friction, that friction stimulates growth and without this growth the relationship is stagnate and dead. I think this applies to all other relationships as well, friction coming in many different forms, some pleasant and subtle and some not, such as my taking a clue-by-four to sheldon. In our case, yours and mine, we both have things to learn from one another and the friction is more subtle, guestioning and ideas that cause a mental friction, of sorts, that stimulates growth.

And there you go again, trailing off on a thought with the dots! ;-)
I dunno, if not significant, it seems to be a defining memory at least. We all have our little guys in here, still directing parts of the show, I believe. I have come to kinda like my little guy, it's some of the older guys that I am still having problems with.
Anyhows, back to the "germs"........
I tried something today, alchemy wise, based upon your alfalfa meal slurry. Last night as I was down in my cups and feeling more than a little sorry for myself, I decided to collect the results of my crying in my beer pity party in a bucket. Today I added alfalfa meal to the Household Compost Activator and applied to the pile. So now it is my turn, in our Mutual Admiration Society, to give credit to you for starting me thinking deeply about decomposing and living stuff and the relationship between life/death produce/waste as applies to soil structure and life in general.
Which brings to mind this twisted little thought, that rather tickles me.......when one recycles a part of oneself, through composting amendments, which is then returned to the garden, to produce a thing that is consumed.... in essence, this makes one a self-cannibal, neh?
And with that gruesome thought......
Sai gobe Charlie
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