leaf miners


I have leafminers in my boxwoods. I opened a leaf the other day and there was the ugly, orange maggot inside. I live in central Virginia, zone 7, and wonder when to expect the miners will emerge and when to spray. I found this info online, but it was written in 1976. I wondered if it's still accurate in terms of stuff to kill the miners and when to put it on. Read on:
"The boxwood leaf miner is the larva of a small gnatlike fly. In spring, the flies inject their eggs into the young boxwood leaves. Larvae from the eggs develop slowly during the summer, hollowing out areas inside the leaves as they feed. They winter inside the leaves. The larval, or feeding, stage of the life cycle is completed late in April or early in May. The pupal stage follows; it lasts about 10 days. During this stage, the larvae turn to pupae. The pupae break through the surfaces of the leaves and work themselves partway out. The adult flies then emerge from the pupae. Adults of this insect are easily controlled with properly-timed applications of carbaryl. To determine the right time to apply carbaryl, watch the development of the pupae. Every 2 or 3 days during the pupal period, break open a leaf and examine the pupae. A pupa's head and wing pads turn dark brown near the end of the pupal period-just before the adult fly emerges from the leaf. This is the time to apply carbaryl. To control the leaf miner when in the young larvae stage, spray with carbaryl about June 15 just after they hatch. Spraying later in the summer or autumn also controls the larvae, but their mines will remain as yellow spots in the leaves. Dimethoate sprays will control mature larvae if applied in early spring as plants resume growth."
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I would not recommend it.
Sincerely, John A. Keslick, Jr. Arborist http://home.ccil.org/~treeman and www.treedictionary.com Beware of so-called tree experts who do not understand tree biology. Storms, fires, floods, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions keep reminding us that we are not the boss.
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2> <P align=left><FONT size=2>I have leafminers in my boxwoods. I opened a leaf the other day and there was the ugly, orange maggot inside. I live in central Virginia, zone 7, and wonder when to expect the miners will emerge and when to spray. I found this info online, but it was written in 1976.&nbsp;I wondered if it's still accurate in terms of stuff to kill the miners and when to put it on. Read on:</FONT></P> <P align=left><FONT size=2>"The boxwood leaf miner is the larva of a small gnatlike fly. In spring, the </FONT><FONT face="Times New Roman" size=2><FONT face=Arial>flies inject their eggs into the young boxwood leaves. Larvae from the eggs develop slowly during the summer, hollowing out areas inside the leaves as they feed. They winter inside the leaves. The larval, or feeding, stage of the life cycle is completed late in April or early in May. The pupal stage follows; it lasts about 10 days. During this stage, the larvae turn to pupae. The pupae break through the surfaces of the leaves and work themselves partway out. The adult flies then emerge from the pupae. Adults of this insect are easily controlled with properly-timed applications of carbaryl. To determine the right time to apply carbaryl, watch the development of the pupae. Every 2 or 3 days during the pupal period, break open a leaf and examine the pupae. A pupa's head and wing pads turn dark brown near the end of the pupal periodjust before the adult fly emerges from the leaf. This is the time to apply carbaryl. To control the leaf miner when in the young larvae stage, spray with carbaryl about June 15 just after they hatch. Spraying later in the summer or autumn also controls the larvae, but their mines will remain as yellow spots in the leaves. Dimethoate sprays will control mature larvae if applied in early spring as plants resume growth."</FONT></P></FONT></FONT></DIV></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>
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what would you recommend I do?
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2> <P align=left><FONT size=2>I have leafminers in my boxwoods. I opened a leaf the other day and there was the ugly, orange maggot inside. I live in central Virginia, zone 7, and wonder when to expect the miners will emerge and when to spray. I found this info online, but it was written in 1976.&nbsp;I wondered if it's still accurate in terms of stuff to kill the miners and when to put it on. Read on:</FONT></P> <P align=left><FONT size=2>"The boxwood leaf miner is the larva of a small gnatlike fly. In spring, the </FONT><FONT face="Times New Roman" size=2><FONT face=Arial>flies inject their eggs into the young boxwood leaves. Larvae from the eggs develop slowly during the summer, hollowing out areas inside the leaves as they feed. They winter inside the leaves. The larval, or feeding, stage of the life cycle is completed late in April or early in May. The pupal stage follows; it lasts about 10 days. During this stage, the larvae turn to pupae. The pupae break through the surfaces of the leaves and work themselves partway out. The adult flies then emerge from the pupae. Adults of this insect are easily controlled with properly-timed applications of carbaryl. To determine the right time to apply carbaryl, watch the development of the pupae. Every 2 or 3 days during the pupal period, break open a leaf and examine the pupae. A pupa's head and wing pads turn dark brown near the end of the pupal periodjust before the adult fly emerges from the leaf. This is the time to apply carbaryl. To control the leaf miner when in the young larvae stage, spray with carbaryl about June 15 just after they hatch. Spraying later in the summer or autumn also controls the larvae, but their mines will remain as yellow spots in the leaves. Dimethoate sprays will control mature larvae if applied in early spring as plants resume growth."</FONT></P></FONT></FONT></DIV></BLOCKQUOTE></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>
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we had a bad case of leaf miners in a young birch. I applied systemic and in a year there were no leaf miners anymore. Ingrid

the ugly, orange maggot inside. I live in central Virginia, zone 7, and wonder when to expect the miners will emerge and when to spray. I found this info online, but it was written in 1976. I wondered if it's still accurate in terms of stuff to kill the miners and when to put it on. Read on:

flies inject their eggs into the young boxwood leaves. Larvae from the eggs develop slowly during the summer, hollowing out areas inside the leaves as they feed. They winter inside the leaves. The larval, or feeding, stage of the life cycle is completed late in April or early in May. The pupal stage follows; it lasts about 10 days. During this stage, the larvae turn to pupae. The pupae break through the surfaces of the leaves and work themselves partway out. The adult flies then emerge from the pupae. Adults of this insect are easily controlled with properly-timed applications of carbaryl. To determine the right time to apply carbaryl, watch the development of the pupae. Every 2 or 3 days during the pupal period, break open a leaf and examine the pupae. A pupa's head and wing pads turn dark brown near the end of the pupal period-just before the adult fly emerges from the leaf. This is the time to apply

carbaryl about June 15 just after they hatch. Spraying later in the summer or autumn also controls the larvae, but their mines will remain as yellow spots in the leaves. Dimethoate sprays will control mature larvae if applied in early spring as plants resume growth."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ List Manager: Puregold Goldfish List at http://weloveteaching.com/puregold / sign up: http://groups.google.com/groups/dir?hl=en&q=puregold&qt_s=Group+lookup www.drsolo.com Solve the problem, dont waste energy finding who's to blame ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ I receive no compensation for running the Puregold list or Puregold website. I do not run nor receive any money from the ads at the old Puregold site. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Zone 5 next to Lake Michigan
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I did that last fall, and it seemed to help, but there must've been some bugs in the leaves that were unaffected because they are definately wrigglin' in there now. Yuck.

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reapply this year and make sure you use enough and that should do the trick by next year. Ingrid

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ List Manager: Puregold Goldfish List at http://weloveteaching.com/puregold / sign up: http://groups.google.com/groups/dir?hl=en&q=puregold&qt_s=Group+lookup www.drsolo.com Solve the problem, dont waste energy finding who's to blame ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ I receive no compensation for running the Puregold list or Puregold website. I do not run nor receive any money from the ads at the old Puregold site. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Zone 5 next to Lake Michigan
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