Lawn Tractor Tires

I have a Simplicity lawn tractor and have two tire problems. One about air and the other about water.
I patched one tire that had a hole in it with one of those patch kits you use a forked screwdriver to push the patch in. The hole was on the side wall, between treads, and doesn't seem to be holding. I applied more rubber cement on the outside, but air still leaks through. If I have to replace the tire, how to I get it off? The wheel doesn't seem to un attach from the axle. Do I need a tire iron, or do I just yank it off? Is it OK to pump in some of that fix-a-flat stuff?
Second, when I went to put air in the rear tire, I hear water sloshing. So I let the water out. And there was a lot of it, and I couldn't get the water below the valve stem. What the heck is going on? How did the water get in, and how do I get it out?
TIA
-- Pat Lundrigan change $ to s to email
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don't know the answer, but you might want to ask it here:
http://forums2.gardenweb.com/forums/tractor /

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 15 Jun 2004 19:26:43 -0400, "do$feratu"

Both your problems are due to the fact that the tire is NOT a tubeless tire, so you can't patch it by sticking a tubeless patch through the sidewall. (The patch kit is not used to patch a sidewall anyway - just the tread area of a tubeless tire!) Second, you can't stop the air leak by gluing the outside of the tire. The tube inside is likely trash - it is probably split wide open by now. The water has gotten between the tube and the tire because the tire was flat and couldn't seal against the wheel.
At the minimum you need a new tube. Because you poked a hole in the tire I strongly suggest you replace the tire. If the inside of the wheel has rusted because of the water you need to sand it smooth and repaint it or the rust will puncture your new tube.
To get it off? Don't exactly know, but you should be able to easily work it off with all the air out once the wheel is off the ground. You have to make sure the tire bead 180 degrees across from where you are pulling has dropped down into the central groove of the wheel to give you the slack you need to pull the tire away from the wheel.
If this is all beyond your abilities take it to a small engine shop and have them fix it for you. Ask to watch. It ain't rocket science, but from your post I know you need to get some basic education about how the wheel and tire go together,
Finally, check your tire pressures monthly and don't let them get too low or you will ruin the tubes and possibly the tires. And have to do this all over again ;(
John Davies http://home.comcast.net/~johnedavies / '96 Lexus LX450 '00 Audi A4 1.8T quattro Spokane WA USA
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
With large tractors water is deliberately inserted into the tyres to maintain a low centre of gravity. I would not have thought this was the case with your lawn tractor~~ but might be wrong. Brian.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@tiscali.co.uk says...

Actually, it's usually a saline solution (to prevent freezing), and EXTREMELY corrosive.
Have not ever seen it used in lawn tractors, and even uncommon in farm tractors these days.
--
Mark

The truth as I perceive it to be.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

They usually use calcium chloride to fill tires for ballast. Its not uncommon to find lawn and garden tractors with filled tires either especially if they are used with any ground engaging implements or snow blowers etc. Another thing thats commonly used in smaller amounts in smaller tires is windshield washer anti freeze.
Calcium chloride is extremely corrosive, and a leak can cause quite a problem in a rim further down the road, so its best to use it in tubes insteadof in tubeless type tires to keep it away from the steel wheels. Visit my website: http://www.frugalmachinist.com Opinions expressed are those of my wifes, I had no input whatsoever. Remove "nospam" from email addy.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I take my wheels ~ to the Simplicity dealer and they fix them / change them, etc. I am in love with my ol' ('72) Simplicity! Get the mechanic to put in tubes, they don't come that way and will keep going flat if you gon't get tubes in them. It helps a whole lot. Sherman.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.