lawn problem around a tree

I just replanted sod around the mulberry tree in front of my house. The grass around the tree has been struggling, competing nutrient with the tree. I have bermuda grass and the shade of the tree makes the situation worse. I am wondering what I can do to keep both the tree and lawn happy. I believe I have watered and fertilized the lawn sufficiently. Thanks for suggestions.
Jay
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The grass can't grow in shade.
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Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
USDA Zone 8b
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On 4/1/05 1:36 PM, in article 9hi3e.2899$pU5.2520@trnddc06, "Travis"

I agree that grass needs the sun to survive and do well. It is very simple, no sun=no grass in spite of fertilizing and watering. I know as I tried to grow grass in a very shaded area. I would bring in grass sod from other areas of my yard, plant it and it would look good for a very short time then turn brown. I tried this over several years with no long term success. Gary
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I have tree rings filled with mulch around *all* my trees. Maybe some flowers, too?
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Toni
South Florida USA
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

It's not that its competing for nutrients; regular turf needs full sun. Shade-tolerant groundcovers are the best option for under trees, but if you must have grass: 1) Select a fescue seed mix that states that it is shade tolerant; 2) don't expect even the alleged shade-tolerant mixes to ever be thick dense turf in the manner of bluegrass in full sun, but a thinly green surface can be achieved; 3) never cut the shaded grass very short as it needs more length to keep itself healthy in imperfect conditions; 4) prune nearby shrubs & if possible thin the tree to let SOME light in. If this fails, plant something like Vinca minora, dwarf English ivy, creeping partridge berry, or if its moist enough, Soleirolia baby tears which can give the general impression of a mowed lawn if you're not too close.
-paghat the ratgirl
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About one fifth of the lawn is affected by the tree and it is a too big area to be covered by mulch. I will look ugly.
If I spead fescue seed over existing bermuda grass, will fescue and bermuda together look good?
Jay
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you could remove some of the lower limbs to get more sunlight and try st augustine as it's more shade tolerant than is bermuda. if you're up north, forget the st. augustine.
On 1 Apr 2005 14:18:45 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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First off, decreased sunlight under the tree canopy is usually a problem. In addition, there is usually less rainfall that gets to the area beneath the canopy. You can try a shady grass mix and supplement water for the area under the tree canopy. But as a lazy, don't-care-about-grass person, I'd say you're best bet is to use a couple inches of shredded mulch in the area and be done with it. Also, when growing grass beneath trees, the grass gets first dibs at the water and nutrients, which means a less vigorous root system for the tree.

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