Lawn And Moss: Getting Rid Of ?

Hello,
Live in New England, outside of Boston.
Boy, what a great season for Moss. Never had so much.
What's a good way of ridding a grass lawn of Moss without killing any underneath grass (assuming there's still any alive underneath ?) ?
Thanks, Bob
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Lime.
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Confirmed. Quick acting hot (quick) followed with the larger grained after a soil pH test. There is a name for the slow acting but I forget. Acid is moss's friend spread powered milk about if you like it (Acid). We have more on just about everything in the last few years. Driveway , patio, pond concrete and house roof.
I'm almost afraid to stand still ;))
--
Bill Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA


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Bill who putters wrote:

Quick lime (AKA hot lime, calcium oxide) is quite caustic, it will burn your eyes and skin and produces heat in contact with water forming calcium hydroxide. Throw some into water and it will spit at you. It will damage just about any plant not just moss and change the pH of your soil quickly thus overturning the balance of microorganisms. Depending on how much you put on you may harm much more than moss, you could have your very own scorched earth policy.
Slaked lime (AKA builders lime, calcium hydroxide) is much less caustic but will still change pH quickly. If you want fast results you can take the risk but if you overdose you will be in trouble.
I wouldn't apply any kind of lime without a pH test first. Part of the problem is that it is hard to know the correct rate of application because the rate depends on both the pH and the type of soil that you have. Clay soils take much more lime to change the pH by one unit than sand soils. If somebody says apply X amount per area without knowing your pH and soil it is entierly hit and miss. So the safest way is to do it progressively with small applications and monitor the pH as you go.
If you want to make your soil less acid without the risk of shocking the microbes or overdosing do it slowly using garden lime (AKA limestone, calcium carbonate) or dolomite (calcium magnesium carbonate).
Add chemicals to you soil in haste and repent at leisure.
David
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On Mon, 19 Apr 2010 08:47:11 +1000, "David Hare-Scott"

Any brand of granulated lime from a garden center works fine, apply with a spreader (rate on bag), granulated lime is time release. Naturally one should check pH but if there's excessive moss growing you can bet your bippee the soil is too acid for lawn grass.
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chemicals required. visit my site http://groups.google.com/group/pakgardenclub -
I am online to meet your requirements shah
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In article

And you do it for "free" like we do, right? Rec.gardens, and rec.gardens.edible are on line to answer your questions for free. However, if you have a reeeeally dumb, or stupid question, you may want to give $hah a try.
--
- Billy
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
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Moss likes shade, moisture and acidic soil. Test your soil pH.
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You should check this website out
http://www.landscape-america.com/problems/weeds/moss.html
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I agree with Brooklyn on this one. My Dad, a Prof of Agronomy, soil chemistry, told my hubby that a long timeago about our moss. He said Moss can't grow unless the Ph is right. Lime, lime, lime. Nan in DE
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You are right,,Why we do not make plants immune to pest ?
I am an Organic Gardener, treating plants with Herbs and Spices, no chemicals required. visit my site http://groups.google.com/group/pakgardenclub -
I am online to meet your requirements shah
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shahwin wrote:

I fail to see what your reply has to do with the issue nor how it might be achieved. Would you care to explain?
David
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Moss frequently grows in compacted soil with low oxygen levels. You could try aerating the soil with a garden fork.
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On Sun, 18 Apr 2010 14:06:50 -0400, Bob

Can you get lawn sand in New England?
Or even better, MO Bacter. It kills the moss and then eats it.
Steven
--
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As well as the others suggestions for lime. To accelerate the process, racking up the moss to remove the majority of it will help.
--
regards, piedmont (michael)
The Practical BBQ'r - http://sites.google.com/site/thepracticalbbqr /
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