Lack Of Trees In Irish And British Countrysides

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I is said that when the Europeans arrived to North America, a squirrel could have gone from the Atlantic coast to the Mississippi River, without putting a foot on the ground.
--

Billy

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9KVTfcAyYGg&ref=patrick.net

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If you bike about here you will see sometimes one large tree in an area of about five acres. This is now multiple homes but not too long ago it was farm land. The one tree was left to provide shade for the horses that pulled the plows.
Bill
--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA

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The Roe Valley has quite a few very nice woods, though a lot of the large commercial forests are terrible and a scar on the countryside. Farmers tended to fell trees everywhere except around their houses I think, hence certain places have many fine old trees.
Our own house was build on the site of an old farm house and there must be about sixty trees on our site, most of them near a hundred years old. Some of them, particularly the ash trees are a wonderful sight.
They were planted as a windbreak, and do that job quite well.
Jochen
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Limavady and the Roe Valley
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jl wrote:

I am sure. But you should be considering replacement trees and planting saplings. The older trees are mature and will start to die all too soon. What about your windbreak then?
--
Hal Mearadhaigh.


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I've planted about thirty trees so far and about 27 have survived the storms. I also planted about 10 young spruce trees harvested from the forest - and three larches were sown naturally - but a herd of sheep got in and nibbled most of those to death.
It is quite difficult to buy good young tree saplings of a kind that are native to Ireland. As I like our plot to blend into the mountain, I don't plant any fancy trees.
As well as trees I've planted about forty or fifty whin bushes - and they look a treat this year.
Jochen
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Limavady and the Roe Valley
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A combination of Spanish Broom and Tree Lupin make an excellent local windbreak (scented).
Donal
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In article <

Thanks for the tip.
Mind you, our house is 200m high on a mountain and open to the South, East and West - in fact we can see across Lough Foyle from the Donegal mountains and the mouth of the Roe to the Sperrins. Some of the winds we get - particularly from the West - are /very/ severe.
I tend to plant only those trees that I know will grow up here because I've seen them elsewhere. Even the oak tree I planted three years ago seems to be dying. Ash, larch and spruce on the other hand seem to be doing very well.
Jochen
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Limavady and the Roe Valley
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They grow easily from seed, buy online and it's not to late. If you use Eucl. Viminalis; plant them only a foot apart and in a group. They will support each other in the wind (groups of two metres diameter) and when the trunks are about eight inches wide they can be harvested. Paint the cut on the living trunks with oil and they will sprout again: same as Salix Viminalis (Osier Willow). Tree Lupin is sown by aircraft in some parts of the world and their roots go sown about twenty feet (stops soil erosion) - also Spanish Broom and Tree Lupin are legumes and produce nitrogen.
Donal
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If you

I can't think of a eucalypt that doesn't resprout if the trunk is cut right off . I don't think there is really any need to paint with oil.
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Sure. But I have other trees and use a mixture of linseed oil with a cheap tin of rooting compound mixed in. I do the same even for osier willow. I'd rather make sure that no disease gets a foot hold and it is my nature to be gentle and kind with plants.
I do have a plum tree where the leaves get full of holes in an area where lots of sloe grow. I'd rather destroy a plant which needs insecticide to live.
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PS. I think I said that I used Spartium Juncium or Spanish Broom together with Tree lupin as a wind brake. I do but to make it clear - where the combo faces storms, the Broom is in front, backed by a very sturdy fence with the Lupin behind the fence. Elsewhere, the fence isn't needed. The combination is so effective that in some parts it is calm even in a gale. Tree Lupin lives for about five years only +/-
Donal
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from snipped-for-privacy@home.org (Way Back Jack) contains these words:

It depends which part of Britain you look at. Some areas are treeless (because of climate, latitude, agriculture, or intensive sheep/deer grazing) Other areas are densely forested with ancient woodlands or modern forestry.
Quote " Forestry Statistics 2007 - Woodland Areas and Planting
The 2.8 million hectares of woodland in the UK represents 11.7% of the total land area; this percentage ranges from 6.4% in Northern Ireland to 17.2% in Scotland." end quote
much more at
http://www.forestry.gov.uk/Website/forstats2007.nsf/0/4E46614169475C868025735D00353CC8
Janet.
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Way Back Jack wrote:

Loreena Mckennitt and some unknown 18th century songwriter pretty much say it all.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YnrNYtOsbEg

"O bonny Portmore, I am sorry to see Such a woeful destruction of your ornament tree For it stood on your shore for many's the long day Till the long boats from Antrim came to float it away.
O bonny Portmore, you shine where you stand And the more I think on you the more I think long If I had you now as I had once before All the lords in Old England would not purchase Portmore.
All the birds in the forest they bitterly weep Saying, "Where shall we shelter, where shall we sleep?" For the Oak and the Ash, they are all cutten down And the walls of bonny Portmore are all down to the ground."
O bonny Portmore, you shine where you stand And the more I think on you the more I think long If I had you now as I had once before All the Lords of Old England would not purchase Portmore."
ca 1745.
--
--
--John
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