kumquat tree

I have a small kumquat tree in a small pot. This is the third year I've had it and it's in the original pot I bought it in. I kept it in the small pot because I over wintered it inside and didn't have a lot of space. Now, it's outside and growing putting on new branches and leaves. Is it too late in the season to re-pot it, now? How much bigger of a pot can I put it in? I have one that would be about 2 sizes bigger, and another pot that would fit it probably for quite a while that's much bigger. Is it OK to put it directly into the biggest pot, or should I go up in pot size gradually?
--
Natural Girl //(*<*)\



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Natural - Smoking Gun - Girl wrote:

All the instructions about replanting when trees are dormant assumes you don't want the shock of root disturbance during the growing season. As long as you don't disturb the roots it doesn't matter much when you do it. You will need to push the new soil around the old root ball firmly and water it in. I would go for the biggest pot you have. If anybody has a reason to increase the size of pot in stages please explain how this is beneficial.
D
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On Thu, 4 Jul 2013 09:45:04 +1000, "David Hare-Scott"

Many small citrus trees are mighty hardy, actually. I transplanted one (Meyer lemon) a couple of months ago as ants had gotten into the pot and I didn't want them there. I basically soaked every drop of soil off the rootball and re-potted it. It is fruiting now, not two months later.
I have had equal success with a keffir lime transplant, again, taken down to the bare root. It came through like a champ, too, although it has never fruited ever. I grow it for the leaves, anyway..
My kumquat was purchased in full bud, but I transplanted it when I got it 6 weeks ago. It is covered with fruits now. I also transplanted a calamondin and a Bearss lime within a day or so of purchase last month. All are well and even thriving.
Potted brown figs, too, are strikingly resiliant and seem to thrive when pulled out, half the roots cut back then repotted. Mine surviced that from April and is now covered with fruit. The Texas fig will get the same treatment next spring.
Boron
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On Thu, 4 Jul 2013 09:45:04 +1000, "David Hare-Scott"

Agreed, I'd use the largest pot. If too heavy to move about with the seasons place it on a planter dolly. (Amazon.com product link shortened)72898431&sr=8-4&keywords=planter+dolly
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On 7/3/2013 9:53 AM, Natural - Smoking Gun - Girl wrote:

Use the largest pot you can move. Make sure your potting mix has excellent drainage; poor drainage is fatal for all citrus. See my <http://www.rossde.com/garden/garden_potting_mix.html for a do-it-yourself potting mix that is perfect for citrus.
Kumquats bloom twice in the summer, about a month between the bloom periods. The fruit ripens in the winter and needs a little chill to get the best color.
Of all citrus, kumquats are the most hardy. See the second paragraph at <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kumquat#Cultivation_and_uses>.
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On Thu, 04 Jul 2013 17:25:54 -0700, "David E. Ross"

kumquat is lubricious
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David E. Ross wrote:

Thanks David, and Boron, and Brooklyn, (and anyone I forgot to include) for all of your advice. The holiday week end kept me busy and I hadn't had time to even read the ngs until now.
I did take a chance when I finally had some free time to re-port the Kumquat and I put it in the bigger pot that I had, used good soil that drains well, and I pushed it down snug to the old root ball, too. Then I watered it well, and put it in a nice sunny spot in the garden. I think I can even see how much happier the plant actually is! (If a plant can smile!) Crossing my fingers hoping it'll bloom and fruit this summer. It's growing new branches and leave already, so I'm hoping it'll be happy in it's new pot for several summers.
--
Natural Girl //(*<*)\



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