Japanese snowball plant

For sentimental reasons, I would like to replace a Japanese snowball plant that we transplanted here after my mother-in-law died. It died during an incredibly wet spring and summer a couple of years ago.
Nurseries are drawing a blank. I suppose it's an old-fashioned plant, but is there another common name for the plant/bush? It blooms all summer, with white "snowballs" similar to a hydrangea. It is not viburnum.
I would appreciate any help on this. Many thanks.
Dora
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limey at toad dot net
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There are many types of Viburnum - perhaps the nurseries are just not familiar with yours?
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http://greenwoodnursery.com/page.cfm/12125
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Another Viburnum that is worth looking at is the locally produced Viburnum plicatum f. tomentosum 'Summer Snowflake' and Viburnum plicatum mariesii.
The Rhododendron Species Foundation garden has a huge mariesii (I think) that will be looking very good very soon now. I'll be down next weekend and if it is out in bloom I'll post a picture. Stunning, if you have the room.
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Japanese snowball is the common name typically applied to Viburnum plicatum. http://oregonstate.edu/dept/ldplants/vipl4.htm Common snowball bush is Viburnum opulus 'Roseum' and there is also a Chinese snowball that is another species of viburnum. I have never heard of anything other than viburnums or sometimes, infrequently, hydrangeas referred to as "snowball bushes" and neither will offer blooms continually all summer. Nothing else comes to mind that offers the same rounded, dense white flowers or that blooms all summer.
pam - gardengal
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"Pam - gardengal" wrote in message >
"limey" wrote in message

Many thanks to those who responded to my original plea. I have bowed to your opinions and references and today bought a viburnum plicatum from a nearby nursery. The saleslady assured me its common name is "Japanese Snowball", which blooms in May. So there's the mystery still, since the one which died bloomed all summer. Strange. Thanks, everyone!
Dora
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-snip-

Worst case-- you've got a new plant that you'll like. Meanwhile-- back to the mystery. . . . .
Do the pictures of viburnum plicatum match your memory?
http://ispb.univ-lyon1.fr/cours/botanique/photos_dicoty/dico%20Q%20a%20Z/Viburnum%20plicatum.jpg
same url -- [ http://tinyurl.com/3xpst ]
Did it actually bloom all summer, or are the spring blossoms persistent? We had a similar looking shrub at a summer house that would sometimes retain a blossom or two through the summer.
Do other folks who saw the same plant remember it the same way? Has your memory merged two of your favorite plants? [memory is an odd thing & I'm always amazed at how we, with the best of intentions, mis-remember things from our lives]
Jim
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"Jim Elbrecht" wrote in message

Yes, the plant looked exactly like it.

You've got a good point. The early, budding, flowers were a very pale green. They then opened, turned white, then stayed on the plant and eventually turned pale green again. Those stayed on the plant until fall, when they turned brown. In retrospect, that's probably why I thought it was blooming all summer.

Yes - my sister-in-law.

Jim
How right you are, Jim. I haven't merged two plants in my mind, but I suppose my memory has played tricks. My pride has suffered, since I thought it was infallible! <G>
Thanks so much for your help.
Dora
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I'm just wondering what features made you rule viburnum out. Was it the leaf shape, flowering period, growth habit etc.? Did the plant flower mainly in the spring/early summer, and then sporadically during the summer? If you can remember the autumn leaf colours that might help too.
Regards.
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I have to agree with everyone that's responded to you Dora. What you had was a viburnum. The "snowball bush" as it is commonly called blooms about now, in mid-spring. Sometimes it will bloom again if the temperatures are cooler than normal, but those blossoms will be sporatic and not nearly as heavy and spectacular as the first bloom. (a lot of reblooming bushes have heavy blooms the first flush, like Kerria Japonica, and then less blossoms on the later blossoming). Victoria and Pam hit the identity right on the head. If that nursery doesn't have that particular variety, try another nursery. Even Lowes has these Viburnums as this is the more commonly offered type along with some other ones now since gardening is more popular now.
At my Lowes I've noticed the spirea's they offer from their nursieries they get their stock from are several different smaller ones, like Neon, Lemon, Crispa, and the more common one that I see in every older yard around the whole area, the one the old ladies call "Bridal wreath" and "Buttons", which used to be the only kind you saw available decades ago. Those two are what I see predominantly in almost every yard and quite mature and blooming right now. The viburnum's availability will be good because it's a commonly offered variety. Good luck, you'll find a replacement. I'm sure of it. madgardener
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