Japanese Maple from Clipping - Can I?

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I have three Japanese Maples in my yard. Can I grow more from clippings?
Earl Williams, Surrey, British Columbia
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NO.

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Well, I disagree. For propagation of these, first choice would be air layering. It worked well with my Japanese maple. Second would be to take cuttings about 1 1/2 feet to 2 feet long and sticking these deep in a well drained tall container filled with thoroughly soaked plain ordinary sawdust. Keep the sawdust moist at all times and in a year or so you'll have your new plants.
*************

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The question was whether they could be propagated from clippings. The answer is still NO, especially in the middle of winter.
He did not ask about using any unusual techniques that only a commercial grower can provide.

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me not "commercial grower". no sell stuff. just for own use. no understand English so good. not understand "unusual techniques". Please explain air layering and cutting is "unusual techniques". this not common way to make more plants from same plant? maybe you never try. maybe you should.
no find in his email he wants pro-po-gate in middle of winter. maybe you can read mind? I no can read mind so good. maybe I read his email again and study more carefully.
not clipping? Dictionary say clipping is "something cut or trimmed off". So 1 1/2 - 2 feet long cut off at end of tree branch not clipping? English very difficult language! no can even trust dictionary!

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As Emery explains, the techniques you describe don't work for Acer palmatum cultivars despite what you claim. Besides, Earl was asking if they can be propagated from clippings for which the answer is still NO.
Grafting is the preferred method of propagation but is beyond the skill of most amateur gardeners. Even you, Tonto.

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Now that funny....A Japanese called 'Tonto'. Shades of Mickey Rooney and Mr. Yunioshi!

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You can have your breakfast at Tiffany's again, now that the mass transit strike is over!!!
How about Pat Morita playing Korean on M*A*S*H?

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no go ... me not in NY. You mind read only selective on east coast?
aw...to you haoles all us Orientals look alike. sometimes you think us even like redskins - not NFL, though. Like in Tonto. Japanese, Koreans, Chinese...you all think we look same. Miyoshi Umekita and Pat Suzuki play Chinese and all you haoles no say nothing hu-hu. Sometimes you even think Mickey Rooney Japanese!

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How dare you call yourself an Oriental. That's a Latin term imposed on you by vulgar Europeans. You are Asiatics!!!!
Do you call "white people" Occidentals? Heck no, we're all lazy stupid honky cracker haoles with too much money with a complete idiot for a president!!!

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On Fri, 23 Dec 2005 04:18:33 GMT
] Well, I disagree. For propagation of these, first choice would be air ] layering. It worked well with my Japanese maple. Second would be to take ] cuttings about 1 1/2 feet to 2 feet long and sticking these deep in a well ] drained tall container filled with thoroughly soaked plain ordinary sawdust. ] Keep the sawdust moist at all times and in a year or so you'll have your new ] plants. ]
All the relevant literature from de Jong to Harris passing by Vertrees agrees that this is a very difficult way to propagate A. palmatum cultivars. If that's what you mean by Japanese Maple. Not to say it's impossible, just very difficult and with a high failure rate. Layering is said to work much better, but the preferred method is grafting.
Further, here's what Vertrees says about plants grown on their own roots from cuttings: "Japanese Maple cultivars, in general, have not proven to be as strong or as reliable on their own roots as when grafted onto good seedling understock. Some plant failure in rooted cultivars, as they get older, is attributed to their being on their own roots."
Of course, some times it's fun to try, and clearly at least Lawrence has found it a worthwhile experiment.
-E
--
Emery Davis
You can reply to snipped-for-privacy@ebayadelkadell.applecom
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http://www.bonsai4me.com/AdvTech/ATLayering.html shows how to do an Acer palmatum.
I do bonsai which doesn't allow for grafting very often (the trunk is supposed to be visually appealing all the way to the ground, not lumpy) and air layering is the usual way to go about it.
Merry Christmas and don't say I never gave you nothing!
:>)
John
who is top posting again...but at least it is 75o F here! So what am I doing inside? Seeya!

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Hi Earl,
Despite what Cereus says (though I do regard most of his posts very well) Japanese maples can and are propagated from cuttings. That's not to say that's it's easy. In general woody plants are difficult to propagate from cuttings. You just have to know how to do it.
I have it on very good authority that many Japanese maple collectors in Japan propagate via cuttings. The reason most if not all the maples you see in retail nurseries are grafted is simply economics. Success rate is typically greater with grafting, though similar success rates can be had with cuttings if you know what you're doing. The thing is to grow a Japanese maple to sellable size takes longer with cuttings. The grower has less of a time investment, much less in fact, with grafted maples. Though the grower does have a higher labor investment as the grower has to raise rootstock and pay grafters which take some skill.
Layne
On 22 Dec 2005 17:12:45 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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You have it on "good authority" but no first hand or even second hand experience? That is little more than rumor and nothing more than hooey.
The reason Japanese maples are propagated by grafting is because cuttings fail to root. Its just that simple.
wrote:

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Well, the *authority* I know has been in maples for a very long time and knows how many maples made their way here from Japan. He also personally knows several collectors in Japan who are also very knowledgable about maples. Respectfully, on this matter at least, I'd sooner trust his knowledge of this fact than your's.
How did you come by your info that maples can't be grown from cuttings?? First hand?? Do you know *how* to propagate maples from cuttings? Or, did you fail because you don't know how? Go to Mountain Maples' website. You'll see there that they grow and sell both grafted and *cutting* grown maples.
Last season I came very close to having a handful of cuttings root. This year I'm planning on changing some things and we'll see if I can do it...firsthand. I'll keep you posted.
Layne
On Sun, 25 Dec 2005 03:40:33 GMT, "Cereus-validus-..........."

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Never said NONE of the maples can be propagated from cuttings, only that the Acer palmatum cultivars cannot be propagated that way. Acer is a fairly large genus and one should not generalize. The weedy Acer species are easily propagated from cuttings. Don't be such a twit.
Hope you and your anonymous *authority* are very happy together. As far as we know, you just made up the person.
When you tell someone to go a website, you should provide the link.
wrote:

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You should have made the effort to find this yourself.
http://www.ubcbotanicalgarden.org/forums/showthread.php?t147
The discussion explains the success in rooting cuttings of Acer palmatum cultivars is extremely low (1 to 2 percent) and the plants grown that way ultimately die within a year or so because of a very poorly developed root system.
Further search will turn up other websites supporting the claim.
wrote:

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On Sun, 25 Dec 2005 11:34:51 GMT, "Cereus-validus-..........."

Yes...and the person you quoted with the low 1% success rate is doing it all wrong. I can tell you that right off the bat...right when he/she wrote "coldframe". I read that post a while back. Did you read FURTHER? Here's another quote from that same discussion:
"Second being those that believe cutting grown maples will have a greater longevity and possibly more disease resistance vs. those mainting the belief that cutting grown maples are inferior.
If one was to research, I believe that we would find the Japanese propagated their maples very successfully through cuttings for many generations, we have chosen to graft to preserve our intitial specimens and for more immediate gratification.
Cuttings are far too labor intense for wholesale propagation and likely too labor intensive for many moderate volume collectible propagators."
This person I quoted is NOT the authority I was referring to earlier. The reason my handful of cuttings didn't make it last season was because of stupid stupid stupid mistake on MY part. There are many variables that govern the success rate of rooted maple cuttings...which I will not go into here.

If you really do your research you find Acer palmatum cultivars have been grown from cuttings for a long time....again, you just have to know how.
Regards,
Layne
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Actually, your link, if the discussion is followed through all the way to the bottom, includes several participants who have successfully rooted acer palmatum cuttings, Cereus.........which unfortunately, weakens the force of your argument.
wrote:

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They may have rooted them but the plants did not survive very long because of the very poorly developed root system.
That hardly qualifies as successful propagation.
The bottom line is that trying to propagate Acer palmatum cultivars from cuttings is a total waste of time.
wrote:

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