Japanese Knotweed

Guys
Hoping you can help here as regards the effective cure and removal of the said knotweed, its been confirmed as knotweed and as we live in a local authority owned and leased property (in Scotland) we are led to beleive that it is infact their duty to effectively and safely (under strict guidelines remove and replace said offending plants) were getting conflicting information and wondered if you might be able to assist.
Any ideas, links to reliable sources of fact etc greatly appriciated.
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Morarview


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On 5/3/12 6:15 PM, Morarview wrote:

Is this Persicaria capitata as described at <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Persicaria_capitata>? Or is thisFallopia japonica as described at <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_knotweed>? (This illustrates whybotanical names are important in international discussions of plants.)
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David E. Ross
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Fallopia japonica
Persicaria capitata is unknown as a wild (or escaped) plant in Scotland, and is not exactly common in England or Wales either. Fallopia japonica on the other hand is an invasive and persistent weed.
--
Stewart Robert Hinsley

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Morarview;957789 Wrote: > Guys

> the said knotweed, its been confirmed as knotweed and as we live in a > local authority owned and leased property (in Scotland) we are led to > beleive that it is infact their duty to effectively and safely (under > strict guidelines remove and replace said offending plants) were getting > conflicting information and wondered if you might be able to assist.

Unfortunately Japanese Knotweed isn't the type of weed which can be 'cured' by cutting it or pulling it out of the ground. It can grow up to 3m (some reports say as much as 5m) down -into- the ground. It can regrow from a piece the size of your fingernail and can remain dormant for up to 20 years.
This obviously leaves you with a slight problem as the law states that you cannot let it grow onto a neighbours land.
Your first option should be to contact the local authority and tell them about the problem - they may not even know about it. If you explain to them that it can 'seriously decrease a buildings value' (http://bit.ly/JLyLUh ) and in some cases mortgage providers 'won't lend on properties affected' (http://tinyurl.com/89x5qnf ) by it.
They should arrange for someone to come out and inspect it and when they realise the problem arrange for have it to be disposed off safely. After all, they wouldn't want their own property affected by it!
--
WiseCharlieD


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Morarview;957789 Wrote: > Guys

> the said knotweed, its been confirmed as knotweed and as we live in a > local authority owned and leased property (in Scotland) we are led to > beleive that it is infact their duty to effectively and safely (under > strict guidelines remove and replace said offending plants) were getting > conflicting information and wondered if you might be able to assist.

I believe that, by law, you have to report this to your local council who will then take steps to eradicate this very invasive weed.
Mick
--
harrisom66


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