Jalapeno Conspiracy

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What has happened to jalapeno peppers?
The ones in the supermarket more often than not taste like bell peppers. I have noticed this over the past few years and it seems to be getting worse with time. We used to get a dudd now and then but now we rarely find a hot one.
The solution of course, is to grow them ourselves. Well guess what?
The ones from the garden shops have the same problem so we started growing our own from seed. Well, guess what again?
This year's jalapenos grown from seeds advertised as hot are perfectly sweet. We sampled three different plants from different areas of the garden and they are all the same.
Any thoughts?
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I've grown Burpee "Jalapeo M" for the past two years and the peppers had plenty of kick. What brand & variety did you grow?
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I've been growing jalapenos from the same packet of Burpee seeds for five seasons now, those suckers are too hot, stick a fork in em and they'll melt the tines.
Hot, and big too:
http://i7.tinypic.com/66kzvko.jpg
Too hot for me, I trade away most with my neighbor for his garlic and Yukon golds.
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It's weird - before I grew jalapeos, I'd only tasted them out of jars, or at restaurants, maybe in salsa or cooked into other stuff. They never impressed me as hot at all. At home, when I want heat in the recipe, I use the cayenn peppers from the garden, fresh or dried. When I grew jalapeos, I figured I'd be getting peppers I could stuff, cook briefly, and woof 'em down like potato chips. Ha. Not.
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Guess what, they're four times as hot when dried and crushed. The usual pizza parlor pepper sprinkle I can literally cover the slice and not feel it's too hot, but not with the ones I grew myself, they are too wicked to eat.
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Is there any chance that your taste has changed? I've always understood the jalapeo to be a not-very-hot pepper. They're plenty hot enough for me, but maybe if you're really comfortable with really hot ones, the less-hot will taste like nothing much. I'm only thinking out loud -- no idea otherwise.
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Melba's Jammin' wrote:

It certainly has changed but is not dead. This all started when I learned that my blood pressure was too high. One of the home remedies/internet factoids was that capsicum reduces blood pressure.
Up to that time, I abhorred hot food and considered it uncivilized and fit only for howling savages.
Well, after a concerted effort to modify my palate, it now takes a jabenero to really challenge me. However, a proper jalapeno still has that nice warm mouth feel and is not confused with the dudds I am referring to. They simply have no heat.
Last year we harvested from about now till frost and nothing changed. Most of them were duds and a very few were hot. We had to add a few jabeneros to each jar of pickled jalapenos to get a reasonably hot batch.
None of this had any effect on my blood pressure BTW but it has expanded my horizons.
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Have you noticed any other foods that don't taste the way you remember them from the past?
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JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

Of course but that is just growing up and becoming more sophisticated.
It has nothing to do with the fact that some jalapenos taste hot and others taste like bell peppers.
The color, age and stress do not seem to have anythng to do with it.
Yesterday we picked about a pound from all over the garden, a few from each plant. Most tasted like bell peppers and a few were hot.
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Same experiences here. However, this year, my home grown jalapenos have a good kick to them. Used same seed as last 2 years. Have had alot of rain. So, contrary to another reply, the amount of water wasn't a factor. Its been somewhat cooler here due to the cloud cover and rain. I did add some sandy loam and some 5-10-10 granulated fertilizer late winter to the garden. I've always picked the jalapenos just before they start changing color.
As far as age, I've gotten more tolerant to spicey foods etc. How about you? Dave

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In article

http://www.penzeys.com/cgi-bin/penzeys/p-penzeysjalapeno.html
Warning Will Roberson.
Bill
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In article

http://www.penzeys.com/ It is worth a look at the peppers just for the heat ratings. Some are too hot hence the warning. Lost in space is right on is it not ? Their paper catalogue is informative just in case you have a crop failure.
http://www.penzeys.com/cgi-bin/penzeys/p-penzeyspiquin.html
Bill
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wrote:

Whoa, you poor old sumbo. Back in harness.
Giddy-up, Billy.
*sniff*, gonna miss ya' old fellow. Charlie
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In article

Joost pusted thees oofer in SMC
http://www.cs.utexas.edu/~jbc/home/chef.html
It turns out that in those with the genetic disposition for metabolic

From your URL.
"The new findings promise to help untangle the early molecular events of a syndrome at the root of one of the world's most significant health issues. Knowing how insulin resistance alters energy storage before it leads to more serious problems can help those susceptible prevent the onset of the metabolic syndrome, Shulman said. Another key observation was that skeletal muscle insulin resistance precedes the development of insulin resistance in liver cells, and that fat production in the liver is increased. These findings also have important implications for understanding the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, one of the most prevalent liver diseases in both adults and children Shulman said.
The good news, according to Shulman, is that insulin resistance in skeletal muscle can be countered through a simple intervention: exercise."
..............
I'd suggest that the shift from sand lot playing to organized games has reduced the amount of exercise significantly. Practice on yada yada and game on Yada Yada not enough. "leave those kids alone" comes to mind . We played every day for hours and in winter it was ice skating and snow removal aka snow forts. Today young folks deal with less physical work, more hours though and sedentary entertainment. I suggest shaking your booty often is a cheap good thing. Fun too.
Dance the night away!
Bill musing yea what about Vitamin D.
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On 7/17/07 12:59 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@c-61-68-245-199.per.connect.net.au, "Billy

Ah - the best way to see Forbidden Planet is with a bunch of science geeks/nerds and pick the plot to pieces.

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Cheryl Isaak wrote:

Pick the plot to pieces? Wasn't the plot lifted right out of Shakespeare's "The Tempest"
(or was that Christopher Marlow? :-)
Best regards, Bob
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On 7/17/07 3:22 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@mid.individual.net, "zxcvbob"

and that can be hysterical. (Best quantum mechanic in the galaxy)
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William Wagner wrote:

That's interesting but I have never tasted ground and dried jalapeno. I am surprised to learn that it should be hotter than Cayenne.
However, I have also lost faith in Penseys. Their Cayenne varies all over the map. The same type will be very mild in one order and very hot in the next.
This can not be a function of age as we have compared two different lots at the same time and in general terms, it takes twice as much of one to get the same heat. Or a wet finger tip full varies from very mild to very hot.
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Jack Schmidling wrote:

dried them and powdered them for several years to use as an additive for "Southwestern" bread. Never found them to be even close to as hot as cayenne. YMMV
George
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George Shirley wrote:

i agree with george, cayenne is definitely better to me too.
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