Is this still organic gardening?

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writes:

pesticide residue remains ;( Frank
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"Organic" means many things to many people. For instance to a chemist "organic" means the matter is attached to a carbon molecule.
If you were to follow the true definition of an "organic garden" you would only use fertilizers of natural source (ie bloodmeal, bonemeal, manures etc). If you were to use synthetic fertilizers (such as 10-10-10 or 20-20-20) you would not be "organic" gardening.
Dave
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David Bunch wrote:

The USDA has regulations on what can and cannot be called organic. However, the regulations apply only to farms which have gross sales over $5000. Since this excludes most gardeners, the word organic means whatever you want it to, no more and no less.
As far as the USDA regulations are concerned, your compost with prohibited materials added would not be considered organic. As I recall, in order to be (sold as) organic compost, it has to reach a temperature of 140 F for some specified period of time (which I've forgotten) and has to be turned 5 times in 15 days.
What will the algae bloom do to the pond inhabitants? Sounds inconsistent with the idea of organic gardening, which considers more than just the garden.
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Hi Dwight
I believe you are referring to "certified organic".
I agree using algae bloom seems to be contrary to the idea of "organic gardening"
Dave
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David Bunch wrote:

It all depends on who defines the word "organic". See my <http://www.rossde.com/garden/garden_organic.html .
--

David E. Ross
<http://www.rossde.com/
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On Sun, 25 Jan 2004 01:26:11 +0000, David Bunch wrote:

Does it really matter? By the time everything's been composted, you are talking molecules.
Why pick nits?
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He picks nits because he's a lousy flea ridden stinky crackpot troll that gets off on talking stupid!!!!
None of you should bother taking his crazy proposal seriously in the first place because its obviously all flaming bull shit.
How long would it take bunch wad to compost into molecules? Not soon enough?

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If that is your intent, why not add an organic (rather than chemical) fertilizer to spur the bloom?
Seems to me you'd have to have a pretty large pond with a pretty significant bloom to generate much in the way of compostables..........
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