Is there oak wilt in Massachusetts??

We recently moved into a brand new property in central mass. It has a number of oaks on the lot and today I noticed the leaves on one of them were brown. This tree is a pin oak (I think: 6 pointed leaves and 3 points on each) and is about 40 feet tall.
I picked up a leaf that had fallen and it had gone completely brown from the tips to about a third of the way back where it was still green.
I am a neophyte to trees and their diseases and the only thing I could find on the web that matched my leaf was "oak wilt". However, a distribution map did not show it to be present in MA.
By the way, and I realize this might be important, this tree has grown on the lip of a natural depression. The builders in their wisdom have filled this depression with excavated dirt. It is not piled against the tree, but I guess it may be a sufficient change in the dynamics of the root system to perhaps cause a problem.
I realize my next call should be to an aborist, however would be interested in some feedback from experienced folks.
Thanks in advance,
Gary
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According to http://www.suddenoakdeath.org , no.
"Sudden Oak Death is a forest disease caused by the fungus-like pathogen Phytophthora ramorum. This pathogen has caused widespread dieback of tanoak and several oak species in the central and northern coastal counties of California, and has to date been associated with 26 different plant species. While some of these species - coast live oak, black oak, Shreve oak and tanoak - sustain lethal trunk infections, other plants get more benign foliar and twig infections. Many of these species with foliar infections play a key role in spread of P. ramorum by acting as a reservoir of innoculum, which may then be spread aerially via wind blown rain. Sporangia and chlamydospores, the most likely propagules of dispersion, are commonly generated on foliage, whereas they have not as yet been found on infested oak bark. The two plants determined to be the greatest sinks for innoculum are California bay laurel/Oregon myrtle and Rhododendron spp. Mortality is most common where oaks and these foliar hosts are found growing together."
Dave

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