Is There A Way To Keep My Arborvitae From Growing To Large?

I would love to put Global Arborvitae in front of my home. The problem is my picture window is only 22 inches above the ground. The ones I am looking at grow to 3 ft high. There is a sidewalk that is 24 inches from the house going past the front window to get to the side. If I plant them in their original pot that I bought them in from Home Depot, will that keep them from growing to the full 3 ft? Will they die if i plant them in their original container?
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rstarre


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On Friday, August 16, 2013 3:08:23 PM UTC-7, rstarre wrote:

Not knowing how big the original container is, I'd still venture that in th e long run, the plants would be much happier in the ground. If you want to keep them from growing more than a certain height, all you have to do is p rune them so they branch out laterally (to the side) rather than vertically (upward). If you do decide on lateral pruning, remember to leave enough s pace on each side so they won't be crowded.
But don't do ANY pruning until the poor things have become established and are putting out new growth!!!
Plenty of info on arbor vitae on-line to answer your questions. For example , just in case -- some people think they should fertilize upon transplantin g. No, no, no! Give them a chance to get their root systems going before y ou give them a jolt of fertilizer.
BTW - what's actually wrong with having the plants showing a little through the picture window? Matter of taste, of course, but could be attractive.
HB

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rstarre wrote:

You bought them, above you say you're still looking.

Globe (not global) arborvitae is very easy to keep sheared to your desired height/width, they can be sheared to any shape you desire... I used to have some I kept as perfect cubes. And there are many varietals, there are dwarf versions too... not all are of the giant type... I have two upright arborvitae that were about two feet tall ten years ago, now are about six feet but only about two feet wide... I could have kept them sheared much shorter but chose not (they are very dense and home to several songbirds), I've never pruned them. I'd definitely plant it in the ground. If they don't behave as you like they are very inexpensive and no biggie to replace... I think juniper makes for a better low growing hedge... of course I've no idea which zone you're in. http://homeguides.sfgate.com/prune-golden-globe-arborvitae-shrub-48331.html
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On 8/17/2013 2:41 PM, Higgs Boson wrote:

Not so. Mix some high-phosphorus fertilizer into the soil at planting time to encourage root development. It's the best time in the plant's life to fertilize it.

I once attended a lecture by a landscape architect who opened with a slide presentation of the design mistakes he'd made over the years, the point being that even pros can screw up. He then continued with slides of successful installations from early in his career that were now hideously overgrown and unsightly. Those were used to illustrate an important point: Most foundation plantings are not meant to be permanent. They provide a certain look for a certain period of time. When they no longer provide that look due to size or age or appearance, you should replace them.
Arborvitae tend to be somewhat slow growing. Plant them, enjoy them for a decade or so, but when they finally outgrow the location, just replace them.
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On Monday, August 19, 2013 10:20:49 AM UTC-7, Moe DeLoughan wrote:

I stand corrected/educated. I should have made clear the distinction betwe en chemical and organic fertilizer application at planting time.
From Ehow:
Phosphorus Fertilizer Application & Time of Application thumbnail     Phosphorus fertilizer helps plants grow strong roots.
Phosphorus fertilizer comes in an organic form like bone meal or an inorgan ic form as a chemical liquid. Application rates and time of application var y depending on whether you choose organic or inorganic phosphorus fertilize r, how fast your plant grows and what type of plant you are growing. Phosphorus fertilizer is used mainly to help plants develop strong root systems. In most cases, it is added to the garden at the beginning of the growing season or when you plant a new plant. Organic phosphorus fertil izers like bone meal stay where you put it, waiting for plant roots to find it and take it up. Chemical phosphorus fertilizers are added to water and poured into the soil. It leaches or moves through the soil when it rains an d might require additional applications. Annual flowers and vegetables grow fast. They need a lot of phospho rus fertilizer and water to sustain them. Spread bone meal under the soil b efore planting seeds or put it in the hole before planting seedlings. Wait until plants start to grow before adding chemical phosphorus fertilizer. Re ad the recommendations on the bone meal box and chemical phosphorus fertili zer box for application rates. Read more: http://www.ehow.com/info_8062505_phosphorus-fertilizer-applicati on-time-application.html#ixzz2cSItSzBd
HB

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On Monday, August 19, 2013 3:13:15 PM UTC-7, Higgs Boson wrote:



ween chemical and organic fertilizer application at planting time.

anic form as a chemical liquid. Application rates and time of application v ary depending on whether you choose organic or inorganic phosphorus fertili zer, how fast your plant grows and what type of plant you are growing.

g root systems. In most cases, it is added to the garden at the beginning o f the growing season or when you plant a new plant. Organic phosphorus fert ilizers like bone meal stay where you put it, waiting for plant roots to fi nd it and take it up. Chemical phosphorus fertilizers are added to water an d poured into the soil. It leaches or moves through the soil when it rains and might require additional applications.

horus fertilizer and water to sustain them. Spread bone meal under the soil before planting seeds or put it in the hole before planting seedlings. Wai t until plants start to grow before adding chemical phosphorus fertilizer. Read the recommendations on the bone meal box and chemical phosphorus ferti lizer box for application rates.

tion-time-application.html#ixzz2cSItSzBd
Addendum:
I just realized how my too-hasty post could have been misleading. I was concerned that the poster would just throw in a bunch of all-purpose fertilizer. causing the new plant to be very confused about whether it was supposed to be rooting, leafing, flowering, or what?? Mea culpa. (Agree that organic phosphorus fertilizer applied CAREFULLY is OK at planti ng.
Last word to poster: When/if you buy phosphorus fertilizer, be sure to hav e the store clerk explain the formula on the box or bag (assuming they know !) so you don't end up with an all-purpose product. I was going to post a site but it was so technical, I gave up myself.
New subject: Slightly OT, but can't resist a plug for my favorite garden " additive" -- worm castings. I put some in the bottom of the hole when I tr ansplant. (Probably should add some bonemeal, per this thread):
There is plenty of info on-line;
Ex: http://www.tastefulgarden.com/store/pc/Worm-Castings-d114.htm
Available in most nurseries and in garden section of homeowners' stores.
HB
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