Is there a better way to remove a poison oak plant than with a chainsaw?

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On Fri, 11 Jan 2013 18:16:26 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

Mine sucks out of the tank(s) when the "soap" nozzle is inserted in the wand. With the other nozzles the pressure is too high to suck the soap out of the tanks.
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On Fri, 11 Jan 2013 12:32:19 -0800, Oren wrote:

Ah. Thanks (and to others who said this too).
I 'could' hook up a few hoses (I bought a few of the gray Costco 3/4" "industrial" 100-foot hoses a couple of years ago.
They're actually crummy hoses (they kink too much compared to rubber), but they're long. I'd only need four of them but in reality, I was looking for a more portable solution once I'm down there, in the ravine, surrounded by the poison oak.
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On Fri, 11 Jan 2013 13:45:06 -0800, Oren wrote:

I did try that and failed - which is why I asked if I have to turn a valve or something first.
But I didn't "prime" it, which is what it may need.
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On Fri, 11 Jan 2013 18:28:22 -0800, Oren wrote:

Hi Oren,
I'd consult the manual I had it.
I can, of course, google for it (or something similar), and, I can ask Cosco - I think that's where I bought it - for the company name, but, I didn't try all that hard simply because I 'suspected' I need to drag four hundred feet of garden hose - which - isn't really all that useful.
Plus, I won't be spraying a huge swath, 20 feet to 50 feet deep without the leaves berrys being on the vine, as I'd be wasting my time.
In addition, I DO plan on spraying what I cut as I learned from this thread that I MUST spray within five minutes (before the sap reverses), but, for that, since it was just cut, I should have access with the hand sprayer.
So, there is no rush on figuring out HOW the sprayer works.
On a different note ... I put the camera strap in the bleach wash:

I was surprised. I had expected it to come out WHITE (I used a LOT of pool chlorine - which is double strength of normal chlorine).
That strap came out better than new.
In addition, the camera is now fully swabbed down with the 1:1:1 mixture of oxidizer + wetting agent + surfactant ... so let's hope the wife & kids don't come down with the itchies in the next week!
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On Fri, 11 Jan 2013 08:34:56 -0800, Bob F wrote:

If I had a sprayer that went 20 feet, that would go a long way toward killing (at least half) the Pacific Poison Oak I want dead.
I tried getting my Honda pressure washer to spray from a 5 gallon jug, but I haven't figured out the controls to do so.
The best time to spray, I'm told, is when the fruits are out.
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On 1/11/2013 10:57 AM, Danny D. wrote:

i have a weed sprayer container that sucks via an venturi, that attaches to a regular hose that will easily shoot 20' in a stream, or can be adjusted to spray in a fan. it only cost a few dollars at the borg.
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http://www.homedepot.com/catalog/productImages/300/76/76711d76-df80-405e-8836-d025a8429b88_300.jpg
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On Fri, 11 Jan 2013 11:25:40 -0700, chaniarts wrote:

Thanks for the picture of that weed sprayer. It appears to use a garden hose as part of the apparatus?
I mentioned somewhere in this thread that this infestation of poison oak starts something like 400 or 500 feet from the house (I haven't meaured it but it's easily a football field away), and goes for a few hundred feet further in the downhill direction.
It's not impossible to handle 500 feet of garden hose (I probably have just about that much already) ... it's not the easiest approach.
Personally I'm looking for a more portable solution for the mountain folks like me who have hilly acreage.
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On 1/8/2013 1:24 PM, Danny D. wrote:

cut the vines where you can reach and paint the cut surfaces with roundup.
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On Tue, 08 Jan 2013 15:44:01 -0700, chaniarts wrote:

I'm not sure I've adequately explained the MAGNITUDE of my problem. :(
Please look at this picture I just took today of the other side of the poison oak plant I'm trying to kill.

This is the full-size picture, just so you can SEE, up front, what I'm dealing with, face to face, man to land:

The sheer number of toxic vines is tremendous, so, cutting each one individually and painting them with weedkiller would certainly work - but - it would take a very long time!
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alt.home.repair:

God, what a nightmare. I get an allergic reaction to poison ivy just looking at it. Even looking at your pictures gives me itchy blisters.
Those things look malevolent, like they're aware of and looking to catch and kill human beings.
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On Tue, 08 Jan 2013 21:35:18 -0500, Nil wrote:

Funny you should say that, because I treat it like a battleground! :)
I dress up in my protective gear, and I fuel and oil my weapon, and then I survey my enemy, looking for the weak spots in his fortress.
As I attack, he reaches out at any bare skin with chemical warfare (1 cup of urushiol can poison everyone on the entire planet!) and I coil back in fear when it slaps me in the face.
But, while slashing away at the outliers, soon I spy the leadership, a thick set of vines, each the thickness of a baseball bat, and I aim at them as Alexander did Darias, to fight my way past the wounded weeping tendrils guarding the lair, until I can get close enough to strike deep and hard at the core!

In the end, I win, and hold up the bleeding trophy in my triumphant hands!

Note: The amount of urushiol you see dripping in that one picture can poison the entire population of the planet, according to the prior references! wow.
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Is there a market for that product?
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Someone years ago used to sell snake venom. I have suggested to sell Urishol to the military, they can spray it on enemy encampments.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
wrote:

Is there a market for that product?
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On Wed, 09 Jan 2013 11:37:15 -0500, Stormin Mormon wrote:

If there is, let me know 'cuz I have enough urushiol sap to contaminate everyone on earth very many times over!
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I love work. I can sit around and watch it all day.
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On Tue, 08 Jan 2013 07:56:54 -0800, DD_BobK wrote:

itemid00067&catid=s446
Those are quite nice!

I do agree that a sideswipe along the isocline line of the steep hill is the way to go because the main roots are six inches thick, and then they branch out in one and two inch thick trunks.
When I cut a trunk, it feels good because I know I've killed a lot but the problem is that the plant really fortresses those thick roots.
They're wholly surrounded by the thinner finger-thick and pencil-thick vines such that you can't get near the main supply line without getting soaked in urushiol.
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On 08/01/2013 09:31, Danny D. wrote:

We are very fortunate here in the UK to not have anything remotely as bad as poison oak/ivy. I wondered, though, if you could find the main trunk(s), would it be possible to pull it out with a chain attached to a truck (winch or tow it). That would avoid a lot of cutting with a chainsaw when the plant is alive, and spreading of the poisonous sap.
--

Jeff

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wrote:

I have a problem with multi-flora rose. Giant nasty rose bushes that dont die from roundup or other herbicides. Although they are not poisonous, so they could be cut with a chainsaw, but to do so would mean getting under them, and becomeing all torn up from the thorns. I designed a chain that has a loop in the end that I lay around the and hook to my farm tractor. When the tractor moves, the chain tightens around their base, and they will be ripped out of the ground. Then they go to my burn pile. However any roots left over will sprout again. But on the small young ones, roundup works.
I've had some huge ones that would stop my tractor. Either the tires slip, or the engine kills. I found that the only way to get rid of those is to burn them. Dump brush and some smaller logs around them, then a gallon of diesel fuel, and ignite. They do not come back once they are burned.
The OP said he can not burn the poison oak. How about soaking the base of them around the roots with diesel fuel. That almost surely will kill them. Then just let them rot. I dont know how long it takes for that oil that causes the skin irritation to go away after the plant is dead. You'd have to do research on that.
Maybe your local County Extension office can help too. They seem to have info on most local problem plants.
I'm sure someone will state that diesel fuel is harmful to the environment. Yes it is, but probably does less harm than many of the commercial chemicals that are used to kill plants and insects.
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On Tue, 08 Jan 2013 12:42:29 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

A lot of farmers in this rural community kill poison ivy and poison sumac by applying a goodly quantity of rock salt at their base. The plant dies and within a year of rain and snow the salt washes away. I've gotten rid of rugosa rose with water softener salt.
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On Tue, 08 Jan 2013 13:52:16 -0500, Brooklyn1 wrote:

I like the idea of rock salt as it must be cheaper than the $100 containers of weed killer that I'm buying today (2.5 gallons each).
This web site explains the NaCl concentration for weed killer: http://homeguides.sfgate.com/rock-salt-concentration-needed-kill-plants-56853.html
While the NaCl appears to be effective, that page also outlines the major problem when it's applied on a hillside where my plant resides.
Plus, I still need to manually remove the dead plants, which are (almost) as toxic dead as they were alive - at least for the foreseeable future.
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