Is there a better way to remove a poison oak plant than with a chainsaw?

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On Wed, 09 Jan 2013 11:36:52 -0500, krw wrote:

I don't mind battling poisonous plants any more than I mind winding torsion springs, but, I do try to know thine enemy thoroughly, and one problem I have in spades is decontamination of something invisible, yet toxic.
To that end, I was just made aware of the most fantastic reliable reference on the net for battling toxic Pacific Poison Oak in the field!
United States Patent 4,594,239, to Pluim, Jr., on June 10, 1986 Titled: Method for neutralizing offensive chemicals http://tinyurl.com/ah7myn3
Summary: Urushiol causes dermatitis by changing the surface proteins in the skin so the body no longer recognizes the skin as human, and attacks it.
That effect is actually fairly easy to interfere with. Pretty much any change to the urushiol molecule would probably prevent dermatitis.
Chlorine bleach is a strong oxidizing agent, and should easily do the trick. Getting it into the oil would be aided by adding alcohol or acetone as a wetting agent, but a strong surfactant should also work.
The patent prefers a solution of acetone + butyl acetate + trichloroisocyanuric acid for neutralizing urushiol on skin, clothes, and equipment; but if I preferentially select just the common household chemicals discussed, the patent seems says that 2% to 6% common bleach alone or combined with 5% to 20% rubbing alcohol (or acetone) as a wetting agent will neutralize urushiol in about 1 minute.
The patent even explains how adding certain ferrous compounds will actually make the toxic urushiol glow green, while the decontaminated urushiol will not.
Armed with this information, I can create a decontamination mix out of the prescribed pool chemicals and rubbing alcohol, which I can use to wash my face, hands, neck, ears, and wrists every 15 minutes, while removing the poison oak in the field!
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Danny D. wrote:

What is butyl acetate and where would you get it?
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I thought you were going to spray it on the plants.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
United States Patent 4,594,239, to Pluim, Jr., on June 10, 1986 Titled: Method for neutralizing offensive chemicals http://tinyurl.com/ah7myn3
Summary: Urushiol causes dermatitis by changing the surface proteins in the skin so the body no longer recognizes the skin as human, and attacks it.
That effect is actually fairly easy to interfere with. Pretty much any change to the urushiol molecule would probably prevent dermatitis.
Chlorine bleach is a strong oxidizing agent, and should easily do the trick. Getting it into the oil would be aided by adding alcohol or acetone as a wetting agent, but a strong surfactant should also work.
The patent prefers a solution of acetone + butyl acetate + trichloroisocyanuric acid for neutralizing urushiol on skin, clothes, and equipment; but if I preferentially select just the common household chemicals discussed, the patent seems says that 2% to 6% common bleach alone or combined with 5% to 20% rubbing alcohol (or acetone) as a wetting agent will neutralize urushiol in about 1 minute.
The patent even explains how adding certain ferrous compounds will actually make the toxic urushiol glow green, while the decontaminated urushiol will not.
Armed with this information, I can create a decontamination mix out of the prescribed pool chemicals and rubbing alcohol, which I can use to wash my face, hands, neck, ears, and wrists every 15 minutes, while removing the poison oak in the field!
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On Thu, 10 Jan 2013 15:57:50 -0800, bob haller wrote:

Nope. That's the whole point. I don't have to clean up any of this poison oak. So, I can take my time.
Basically, when I get in the mood for a good fight, I head down to the ravine for battle. It's really more of a hobby to figure out how to defeat the poison oak, to beat it at its own game - and not get rashed in the process.
It has been a tough battle - but I've learned a lot in just the past few days, so, eventually, I'll know the secret.
Today I talked to a pharmacist. I must have gotten a bad apple because she kept telling me it's for women and that it won't work on the skin and that it wasn't an "approved purpose".
I need to find a pharmacist who can actually think out of the box. (It doesn't seem to be their specialty as all they do is follow the rules.)
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On 01-10-2013 23:08, Danny D. wrote:

I once argued for five minutes with a pharmacist who didn't want to fill my prescription for four 85 cc doses of Lovenox. "Only comes in fifty and a hundred." I finally convinced him I am capable of squirting fifteen CC into the sink.
--
Wes Groleau

In any formula, constants (especially those obtained
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I have a similar "while I have the time" project. I collect rocks out of a farmer's field, and fill mudholes with them. One I've been working on, is where the utility guys pull off the road to do phone wiring. The mudhole is probably four by 10 feet or so. I've put in a bunch of buckets of rocks, and I'm falling behind. The mudhole is still there.
A few years back, I used buckets of rock to fill the sink holes at my church, next to the storm drain.
Farmers are better off without the rocks, and the rest of the world is better off without the sink holes. I only harvest rocks between crops, won't walk on shoots or harvestable crops.
I also am not all that impressed with "in the box" thinkers.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Nope. That's the whole point. I don't have to clean up any of this poison oak. So, I can take my time.
Basically, when I get in the mood for a good fight, I head down to the ravine for battle. It's really more of a hobby to figure out how to defeat the poison oak, to beat it at its own game - and not get rashed in the process.
It has been a tough battle - but I've learned a lot in just the past few days, so, eventually, I'll know the secret.
Today I talked to a pharmacist. I must have gotten a bad apple because she kept telling me it's for women and that it won't work on the skin and that it wasn't an "approved purpose".
I need to find a pharmacist who can actually think out of the box. (It doesn't seem to be their specialty as all they do is follow the rules.)
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On Fri, 11 Jan 2013 13:45:35 -0500, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Hi Stormin Mormon,
I like that sentiment. Duplicate others' success and not failures!
That's apropos because many people just dive in, and that duplicates the failures, and few report back the successes so others can follow.

Yeah. One thing I learned by doing is that Nikon camera straps are STRONG!
Look at this picture:

That camera strap was just washed with the whites (socks, underwear, towels, sheets, etc.) for a 90 minute hot wash with the bleach dispenser filled with 12% pool chlorine (that's twice the strength of household bleach).
I had fullyy expected the camera strap to turn white (or brown), and for the faux leather to peel off - but it all looks like it's brand new!
Who would have thought that the Nikon camera strap was that hardy!
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On Sat, 12 Jan 2013 15:59:58 -0800, Bob F wrote:

The glycol ether is supposedly a biocide, so, it might be.
It's the most important component of the detox solution because it will do two jobs deep in the dermis at the Langerhans layer. 1. It binds to the urushiol receptor 2. It swaps places with urushiol already bound to the receptor
So, it behooves me to find a good source for the glycol ether.
It matters which one I choose because the shorter chain glycol ethers are known to cause testicular degeneration (whatever that is - but it doesn't sound good).
I haven't chosen which glycol ether yet, as my choice is either the nonyl phenyl ethoxylate commonly known as nonoxyl-9, or the longer-chain butyl variant (111-76-2) known as 2-Butoxyethanol.
I'm still reading up on this so that's why I haven't chosen which glycol ether to use yet.
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On Sat, 12 Jan 2013 18:26:28 -0800, TimR wrote:

This is actually a VERY GOOD attack plan!
It would work. And, it doesn't require a huge spraying effort.
I think that's what I'll do.
The beauty of the tunnels is that these are VINES.
The weak link on a huge vine is merely to slice it near the bottom.
If I cut a path, that kills a LOT of cross-connecting vines!
If I cut a cross, that kills ALMOST ALL the vines at one point.
Nice idea!
Then, as you said, widening is easy, year by year.
I have the time to kill the vine!
I love innovative ideas that make sense! This one makes sense!
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Must have resonated well. This is the largest number of exclaimation points I've seen in this thread!!!!!!
I guess calling in the Air Force to practice with napalm has been ruled out?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
On Sat, 12 Jan 2013 18:26:28 -0800, TimR wrote:

This is actually a VERY GOOD attack plan!
It would work. And, it doesn't require a huge spraying effort.
I think that's what I'll do.
The beauty of the tunnels is that these are VINES.
The weak link on a huge vine is merely to slice it near the bottom.
If I cut a path, that kills a LOT of cross-connecting vines!
If I cut a cross, that kills ALMOST ALL the vines at one point.
Nice idea!
Then, as you said, widening is easy, year by year.
I have the time to kill the vine!
I love innovative ideas that make sense! This one makes sense!
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On Sat, 12 Jan 2013 15:55:17 -0800, Bob F wrote:

I was thinking about ajax - but that seems too abrasive. Pumice would obviously work. As would the polyethylene granules.
An abrasive is important because we're assuming the urushiol sap has been on the skin for a day or two, so we need to get deep down to the Langerhans's dendritic cell layer where the now-activated quinone is bound to the receptor.
We then need to pull that quinone OFF the receptor, and replace it with the glycol ether, along with blocking all the other receptors with glycol ether.
Then we need to wash it all away, so that it doesn't infect further.
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On Tue, 08 Jan 2013 17:02:00 -0500, krw wrote:

Now that's a new idea!
I'll google to see what the heck a fruit-tree sprayer looks like!
I failed today to get my pressure washer to work because I couldn't figure out how to get it to suck from the jug instead of from the hose.

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On Tue, 08 Jan 2013 08:46:24 -0800, TimR wrote:

Hi Tim,
Yes. The Roundup weed killer works.
I buy this concentrate for about $100

The problem with Roundup isn't that it doesn't work.
The problem is getting to the plant, which fortresses itself with 10 to 20 feet of vines, such that I can't get the roundup to the leaves.
The fact the poison oak, out here, is always on a steep hill, makes it doubly hard to get the roundup to the leaves.
I'm thinking whether a pressure washer could work to throw the roundup the necessary 20 feet, but I've only hooked my pressure washer to a garden hose and never to a 25-gallon bucket of weed killer.
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On 1/8/2013 3:24 PM, Danny D. wrote:

Have you tried 2,4D? It works on my poison ivy.
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On Tue, 08 Jan 2013 17:35:56 -0500, Frank

Agent Orange, there you go! ;-)
Poison Ivy is better killed with a "wooded plant" herbicide. 2,4D probably qualifies, though there are several sold these days.
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On Tue, 08 Jan 2013 18:00:34 -0500, krw wrote:

I'd say this poison oak plant I just cut today is pretty "woody"! See this picture of the urushiol literally dripping out!

Apparently 8 ounces can infect everyone on earth - and - if you look at this one stem, I'd wager we could get that 8 ounces out of it in an hour!
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On Wed, 9 Jan 2013 01:21:29 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

That's probably why woody plant herbicide works better. ;-)

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On Tue, 08 Jan 2013 17:35:56 -0500, Frank wrote:

Hi Frank, 2,4D (aka Agent Orange) might work, especially if I could drop it out of the sky like they did in Vietnam - which - is my real problem with weed killers.
The poison oak plants I have are 20 feet long by something like 5 to 10 to 20 feet deep, so, there's just no way a normal weed killer sprayer is going to go the distance.
Today I tried to see if I could get my pressure washer to suck out of the 5 gallon pesticide jug - but I couldn't figure out how to do it.
Does anyone know how to get a pressure washer to spray the stuff?

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On Wed, 9 Jan 2013 01:16:01 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

Put it in the pressure washer's soap tank? Do any pressure washers suck up the "soap" when they're running at pressure? Every one I've seen will only draw from the tank when it's running very low pressure (won't spray very far). OTOH, they do sell 20' extensions for pressure sprayers.
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On Wed, 09 Jan 2013 11:07:56 -0500, krw wrote:

I'm confused.
I could not figure out HOW to get the pressure washer to suck a fluid out of an external tank (i.e., a soap tank).
Clearly my Honda pressure washer has a mechanism for sucking up the fluid as shown in the picture - but I've never done it.
Q: What do I have to do to a pressure washer to make it suck from the soap tank? Is there a valve or setting I have to twist or turn?

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