Is Bill Gates Trying To Hijack Africa's Food Supply?

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Oh, you would think so, wouldn't you? But no! Monsanto GM genes infiltrate his fields, and he gets whacked for 'stealing' their property. Absolutely incredible. See here http://www.percyschmeiser.com /
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Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
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Yea, I know about them, but the lamestream agribusiness is doing a helluva job (in cahoots with our very government) of squashing the movement. I hope someday we are walking through fiels of open-source seeds (ala Fahrenheit 451 and the forest) but I don't see it happening as of now :o(
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Ann
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To a great extent it's down to the people to pressure their governments to resist the likes of Monsanto - difficult in countries where the media isn't so strong and the people less informed, but in the US and Canada...?! The UK, and I think, most EU countries don't permit the growing of GMO crops. Any GM ingredient in imported stuff has to be *clearly* labelled and the public's distatse for genetically modified foods has kept them off the supermarket shelves.
Monsanto and their ilk have put a lot of pressure on the UK Govt, but *public* opinion has - for now - prevailled.
Maya
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It's great to say 'pressure their governments' but do that and see what kind of pressure is brought to bear against that 'pressure'. The petrochemical industry has a stranglehold on at least the US economy, I think it's got a pretty firm (perhaps more subtle) grasp on the EU and the rest of the world, too. Lots of power and money there to fight against.
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Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
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every year I teach my college students about the threat of GMOs, of monoculture and monogenetics. I hit on the inbuilt pitfalls of the "green revolution", I use the Harvest of Fear tape by Frontline to teach them about GMOs. And then I give them the background on why "better and more starch" does not make for healthy humans. they used that "poor washing" to push GMO yams or sweet potatoes or something like that onto African farmers. yeah, right, what Africans need is a cheap source of high quality protein, not starches. Protein builds brains and keeps the immune system humming. So they want to institute a GMO yam and now the whole crop of entire parts of Africa will all be susceptible to the next mutation and the whole crop will crash and people starve. The Irish potato famine all over.
There is plenty of milk in the US, but Monsanto knew if they could push GMO milk down the throats of American kids, we would buy ANYTHING GMO. and they were right.
There is plenty of food in the world. people starve because there are wars, transportation problems and greed. Ingrid
On Thu, 07 Jun 2007 23:29:13 -0500, Charlie wrote:

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On Fri, 08 Jun 2007 10:49:54 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@wi.rr.com wrote:

Article on "greenwashing" and corporate and enviro "cooperation"
Full article: http://www.commondreams.org/archive/2007/06/07/1709 /
Excerpt:
Every day seems to bring another announcement from a large corporation that it is taking steps to protect the planet. IBM, informally known as Big Blue, launched its Project Big Green to help customers slash their data center energy usage. Newmont Mining Co., the worlds largest gold digger, endorsed a shareholder resolution calling for a review of its environmental impact. Home Depot introduced an Eco Options label for thousands of green products. General Motors and oil major ConocoPhillips joined the list of corporate giants that have come out in support of a mandatory ceiling on greenhouse gas emissions. Bank of America said it would invest $20 billion in sustainable projects over the next decade.
Many of the new initiatives are being pursued in direct collaboration with environmental groups. Wal-Mart is working closely with Conservation International on its efforts to cut energy usage and switch to renewable sources of power. McDonalds has teamed up with Greenpeace to discourage deforestation caused by the growth of soybean farming in Brazil. When buyout firms Texas Pacific Group and KKR were negotiating the takeover of utility company TXU earlier this year, they asked Environmental Defense to join the talks so that the deal, which ended up including a rollback of plans for 11 new coal-fired plants, could be assured a green seal of approval.
Observing this trend, Business Week detects a remarkable evolution in the dynamic between corporate executives and activists. Once fractious and antagonistic, it has moved toward accommodation and even mutual dependence.
The question is: who is accommodating whom? Are these developments a sign that environmental campaigns have prevailed and are setting the corporate agenda? Or have enviros been duped into endorsing what my be little more than a new wave of corporate greenwash?
Charlie
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snipped-for-privacy@wi.rr.com wrote:

Indeed greed is a big one. Either The World Bank buys off a local dictator, leaving the masses to pick up the tab (re: no money to grow or buy food) or it is Mobile, Exxon, or BP paying off the Nigerian leaders while the oil companies suck billion$ out from underneath impoverished villages, while fouling their fields and streams in the process (re: no food, no money). Hell, I'd be taking rich, white, westerners hostage myself. Nobody listens when you say "please".
- Bill Coloribus gustibus non disputatum (mostly)
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snipped-for-privacy@wi.rr.com says...

Well, the other version of the Irish potato famine was the starvation was really due to excesses taxation and rents. Which were paid with food.
I think the point of that is that, when the blight disease reduced yields, the people could have been saved if they had had a commensurate reduction in the tax/rent debts for those years.
I wasn't around then, and haven't researched enough to form a firm view on the actual influences, either way.
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On Sun, 10 Jun 2007 00:27:10 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@THE-DOMAIN-IN.SIG

I am fairly well read/viewed on that tragedy. There WAs food produced, but the Irish could not eat it; they had to let their English masters take it and sell it to make money.

It's a very complex question. Hope people don't get too mad when I point out that very "traditional" people like the poore, unsophisticated, priest-ridden Irish, and the Highland Scots* tend to cling to their old ways.
True, the poor Irish diet of potatoes and milk did make a reasonably nutritious diet, but these poor people were not prepared when disaster struck, and their heartless (*&^^%#$%^ English masters couldn't have cared less that peasants dropped dead in the roads with grass in their mouths...
This is no way disagrees with OP about the confiscatory taxes and rents levied by their English masters, about whom you may have guessed that I entertain certain opinions!
*(who were evicted en masse by the heartless English Clearances in conspiracy with the venal Lowland Scots, and the Highland Clan leaders who betrayed their followers -- followers whose blind loyalty to their "fathers" led to their downfall..
So, out with the shaggy, clannish, reivers (cattle stealing was their funnest occupation!) in their mountain retreats, living in smoky huts, but doing it THEIR WAY. In with the sheep, a much more productive indu$try...
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snipped-for-privacy@adelphia.net wrote:

A more productive indu$try in deed when you had all that cheap labor because the Commons were closed, and there was nowhere to raise food any longer. The "colonists" played the tribes off against each other. ( A tribe usually takes care of it's own, and to the colonists, all the indigenous were "other".) It's still a very popular game, here and now, we call them pro and anti-immigrants, pro-life or pro-choice, gay marriage and straight marriage, blacks, whites, Jews, Catholics, tree-huggers, and us and them. The masters have us fighting over the same friggin' bone. Today in America, if you work your butt off to make a living, your tax is about 33%. If you invest and go play golf, you pay 15%. In the Sunday fishwrap, it was reported that the increase in families that earn half of a poverty wage, increased by 30% since 2000.
Don't blame the others for our problems unless they happen to live in the mansion on top of the hill. This is not going to change until there is public funding of elections, so that our representatives aren't bought and sold like so much beef.
- Bill Coloribus gustibus non disputatum (mostly)
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wrote:
[...]

[...]
From your keyboard to Her ear!
But don't hold your breath for the much-desired public financing of elections. Too much money in the present system for purchase of TV ads, where the contending cattle seek to attract the fickle, deeply ignorant, blindly complacent voters.
Apres nous, le deluge!
Persephone.
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On Jun 11, 12:59 am, snipped-for-privacy@adelphia.net wrote:

You might also want to look into the history of the Enclosure Acts - which robbed the English peasantry of their ancestral lands and forced them into the factories - the reason why England no longer has a peasant class as most other European countries do (and why farmers are so generally derided and disliked by the English working class). Also the corn laws, which did as good a job at starving the English as the potato famine did in Ireland.
Very few of the 'masters' were, in fact, English, but Irish and/or Scots; descendents of the same Norman invaders who made up the ruling class in England and lowland Scotland. The English *people* were as cruelly oppressed as their neighbours to the north and west.
Gill
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wrote:

I do know a little about the Enclosure Acts -- not as much as the Clearances, but enough to mourn the demise of the small farmer, Jeffersonian though I may appear. (Actually, more Hamiltonian..)

last paragraph; I do want to read up on the ancestry of the "masters".
As a card-carrying language freak, however, I have to acknowledge that those Normans did bring an infusion of French words to what had been, IIRC, a mixture of Anglo-Saxon and Frisian. Such that we have for so many words, both an "English" and a "French" alternative. The French one being the language of the conquerors and the English of the conquered locals.
Persephone
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wrote:

Persephone, Persephone, Angles and Saxons both spoke Fresian (Platt Deutsch). Circa 700 AD they were invited to Britain to fight the Norsemen (Vikings), where upon they chased the Celts into Wales and what would become northern France (Brittany) or as the French call it Petit Britain .
1066 and the Battle of Hastings. William (Guillaum de Normandie) the Conqueror became William I, King of England.
The fortunes of the inhabitants is reflected in the names for their dwellings. The Celts lived in a ham. Many hams together were called a hamlet. The Angles and Saxons lived in ein echte Haus (house). Whereas the new French conquerors lived in maisons (mansions).
Today, English is probably about a third Celtic, a third Platt Deutsch, and a third French with a smattering of imported words.
If you go back to 1600 England, English (Chaucer) is nearly unreadable. Germany wasn't unified until 1871 and each region still has their own dialect. When the bar becomes full and a local wants in, the foreign accent is tossed out. French you can read back to the 1200's.
And that's the way it is.
- Billy Coloribus gustibus non disputatum (mostly)
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On Jun 10, 12:27?am, snipped-for-privacy@THE-DOMAIN-IN.SIG <Usenet2...@THE- DOMAIN-IN.SIG> wrote:

This is a garden forum. Keep the nut stuff on nut sites. In Africa, yes protein is great but going to bed with NO FOOD makes the starch look a lot better. Regards - Jim
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Uh, let me say it slow so you will understand jimnginger.
There is a reason that we garden and that is to have healthy food. To that end we sometimes ramble about the ways Monsanto, Archer Daniels Midland, and ConAgra try to shove their big profit margin crops down our collective throats (4 cents of corn in a $4 box of corn flakes). If Franken Foods Inc. can get main stream people in one continent to accept their products their prospects of selling it to rich, stoopid Americans are vastly improved. So sometimes we chat about how other countries are getting screwed by the aforementioned and how much sand is being put into the vaseline.
Our gardens are our first line of defense against these blood suckers. When we forget what a real tomato, or cucumber, or parsnip, or corn tastes like, we are doomed.
Sorry the nuts here are such a bother but you'll get used to them. Wait and see.
- Billy Coloribus gustibus non disputatum (mostly)
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And a big Pagan "Amen" from the wilds of upstate New York!
Gary Woods AKA K2AHC- PGP key on request, or at home.earthlink.net/~garygarlic Zone 5/6 in upstate New York, 1420' elevation. NY WO G
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I hear you folks. But does a root cellar or Ball jars mean anything to most folks ? Does it matter that it is lost art? Self sufficiency as healthy issue may matter in time but how sick is really sick enough to garden a wake up call. Garden has another meaning similar to foster but I can't garden it now.
heirloom noun a valuable object that has belonged to a family for several generations. ORIGIN late Middle English : from heir + loom 1 (which formerly had the senses 'tool, heirloom' ).
Our family lost much of our tools in about 1930 when the concept of modern was being promoted. Some guys went about our (Fathers birthplace) and purchased tools like shoe horns fancy ones to do your own repairs and tools for household chores. This in USA Philadelphia area.
Seems a lot of our issues are driven by economic interest. I can recommend reading but hands on weeding and sweat and less media may indicate a way along with the word Frugal. To this add simplicity.
Bill
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In article < snipped-for-privacy@sn-indi.vsrv-sjc.supernews .net>,

Your right about Ball jars and root cellars but we are getting pushed that way. Trouble is there is little time for canning. Little time for protest. Coincidence?
- Billy Coloribus gustibus non disputatum (mostly)
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In article

Time time time drum beat not Floyd........
Meanwhile I do what I do and if anyone asks I think of eternal return however I fight it as my nature requires.
Bill
http://www.lyricsfreak.com/p/pink+floyd/time_20108616.html
Ticking away the moments that make up a dull day You fritter and waste the hours in an off hand way Kicking around on a piece of ground in your home town Waiting for someone or something to show you the way
Tired of lying in the sunshine staying home to watch the rain You are young and life is long and there is time to kill today And then one day you find ten years have got behind you No one told you when to run, you missed the starting gun
And you run and you run to catch up with the sun, but its sinking And racing around to come up behind you again The sun is the same in the relative way, but youre older Shorter of breath and one day closer to death
Every year is getting shorter, never seem to find the time Plans that either come to naught or half a page of scribbled lines Hanging on in quiet desperation is the english way The time is gone, the song is over, thought Id something more to say
Home, home again I like to be here when I can And when I come home cold and tired Its good to warm my bones beside the fire Far away across the field The tolling of the iron bell Calls the faithful to their knees To hear the softly spoken magic spells.
--

S Jersey USA Zone 5 Shade
http://www.ocutech.com/ High tech Vison aid
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