Inoculating a new compost pile with aerobic compost tea?

In regards to a previous post and response by V.
Hmmm...this triggered a thought! I wonder what would be the results and would there be benefits, to inoculating a new compost pile with aerobic compost tea? Compost tea is on my list to use this year, after learning of it last year, thanks to cat daddy.
Would this hasten the process? Would it significantly boost the level of bacterial and fungal microbes? Would the addition of dried molasses to the pile be beneficial? Seems to me that regardless of anticipated benefits, it couldn't be a "bad thing". That is often one of my criteria for gardening experiments....as long as it does no harm, what is the harm. ;-)
Charlie
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On Apr 18, 9:00 pm, Charlie wrote:

You have sufficient microbes already present. Amplify their numbers by feeding them. A shot of molasses mixed into a watering can and poured over an aerated compost pile will have the same effect as pouring in tea, with less work.
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<Charlie> wrote in message > In regards to a previous post and response by V.

Neither would do harm. Go for it if it floats your boat. As to how much it would help; maybe a little. When I started compost piles in 'virgin territory' I'd give it a good shovelful from and an established pile. When I first started composting about mumble50mumble years ago I had a pile that sat for months and did nothing. I had mixed, added, watered, did all the books said and it was just not working. The neighbor man who had been watching all my fruitless efforts came over with a bucket of compost from the bottom his pile, dumped it on, gave it a few tosses and I was off and running as a full fledged composter. After that I always kept building in the same place or if starting a new pile I just added a shovelful of established compost as a matter of course. I just didn't get all intensely scientific about cooking compost. Didn't have time... I was too busy gardening ;)
Val
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Val wrote:

When I start a new compost pile, I pee on it for a few days. They seem to like that.
Bob
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On Fri, 18 Apr 2008 20:00:45 -0500, Charlie wrote:

There are compost manufacturers who do spray innoculant if the ratio nitrogen to carbon is off and they layer the piles into wind rows. On a small scale it is not necessary. The thing which hastens compost is air, so turning your pile once or twice a week, making sure it's kept moist (not wet) will give you faster results.
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Just seen a magazine test report on compost makers. They tested various methods including the basic nothing added. Guess which was best? That's right, the basic nothing added at all; just turned regularly. It made better compost, faster than any of the fancy additives.
PDM
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On Fri, 18 Apr 2008 20:00:45 -0500, Charlie wrote:
Thanks all for the thoughts. Seems as if you can't really improve simple after all. Just stay out of the way and let natural process do their thing.
Charlie
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